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NEWS
September 10, 1989 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like a young kid anxious to impress, John Simpson showed up for his new job a half-hour early Wednesday. "I started early 'cause there's a lot to do," Simpson said, peering up from his push broom and glancing south down the 6100 block of Torresdale Avenue. "I probably won't get this block done today, there's so much to do. " Ambitious he may be, but Simpson is no kid. Wissinoming's new street sweeper is a retiree, an erstwhile truck driver who first pushed a broom professionally for the WPA during the Great Depression.
NEWS
April 7, 1990
It shouldn't be up to you and us to join in cleaning up, painting up and fixing up the Zoo. That's the sort of thing the city should be responsible for, right? Right. But the city is in such desperate financial straits it has drastically cut the Class 500 program, under which the Zoo would have received almost three-quarters of a million municipal dollars. Even raising the admission fee isn't enough to meet that shortfall. So unless volunteers do what has to be done at the Zoo, there's a good chance it won't get done.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
One neighbor called her "the broom lady. " For good reason. Hardly a day went by - "winter, summer, you name it" - that Olga B. Carlile, 80, wasn't outside sweeping the sidewalk in front of her Kensington rowhouse on Allegheny Avenue near Kensington. Not only did the 80-year-old women sweep her sidewalk, she cleaned the pavements of neighbors. And when it snowed, a shovel replaced the broom. Ironically, it was Olga Carlile's penchant for sweeping - and shoveling - that led to the discovery of her body by police yesterday in an unheated second-floor bedroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By ROGER MOORE, The Orlando Sentinel
"Jumping the Broom" is like a Tyler Perry movie with polish. An ensemble comedy about a wedding that joins a wealthy, Martha's Vineyard family of African-American professionals with the groom's more down-to-earth, working-class Brooklynites, it is well-cast, well-played, passably written and filmed in the warm glow only the top-drawer cinematographers can achieve. And if this T.D. Jakes project (he produced it) lacks the scruffy, hit-or-miss outrageousness of Perry's down-home Atlanta farces, it compensates with heart, smarts and a confident air that Perry's pictures lack.
NEWS
July 8, 1989
The top brass of the Philadelphia Police Department are hitting the streets on night patrols to counteract the shortage of cops. It's not a perfect solution, and it doesn't make up for the fact that there are not enough officers, especially in summer, when so many are on vacation. But it seems like an honest effort to augment the force at a time when money and personnel are strained to the limit. Maybe Police Commissioner Willie Williams has come up with an idea others ought to try. It wouldn't hurt to see the streets commissioner out pushing a broom or the head of Licenses and Inspections doing a little licensing and inspecting.
NEWS
December 27, 1995 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
When international figure-skating champ Axel Mederic whooshes past the stands during his performance in "Walt Disney's World on Ice," his body may be executing spins, but his brain is thinking broom. This is not as easy as it looks. "In the beginning it was, like, 'Oh my God. How can I do that? Be a broom?' " said the 25-year-old French national, who plays Mickey's overzealous sweeper in the show's "Fantasia" scene. He laughs. "For me, it was very difficult at first, and I could tell from my skating that I didn't like it. " Enter Disney coaches and directors, men and women for whom there is, after all, no such thing as an inanimate object.
NEWS
August 25, 1989
Get a job. Inevitably, it's offered as a solution whenever the man-in-the-street grapples with what to do about the people actually living on the street - and particularly those panhandling. The suggestion is made: Give 'em a broom and put 'em to work cleaning up Philadelphia. Certainly, people down on their luck would be that much closer to moving off the streets or out of public shelters if they could earn a wage - and the sense of self-worth that usually goes with even humble labor.
NEWS
September 17, 2010 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A couple of home invaders in Chester got a lesson early Thursday they won't soon forget: A 43-year-old woman chased them off with a broom. The two men, described as being in their late teens or early 20s, encountered the woman's 49-year-old husband when they entered the home in the 2300 block of Madison Street. He was tied up, kicked, and beaten, and his ankle was broken, Chester Police Capt. Stephen Fox said. When the man's 80-year-old father came downstairs, one of the men pointed a handgun at him and demanded valuables.
NEWS
September 17, 2010 | By STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
Two armed home invaders were swept away yesterday by a Chester homeowner who chased them off with a broom, according to police. Shortly after midnight, the two young, unidentified men broke into a house on Madison Street near 22nd owned by an Asian family that runs a convenience store in the city, Chester Police Capt. Stephen Fox said. After the men broke in through a rear window, a 49-year-old male resident of the house went downstairs to investigate and wound up with his hands and feet tied with a belt and an extension cord, police said.
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NEWS
January 21, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
WHEN HIS SON was caught allegedly shoplifting at the Burlington Coat Factory in Upper Darby on Friday, Marvin Francis didn't just sweep it under the rug. Instead, police say, he grabbed a broom from a sales display as he walked to the security office. Once there, he beat his son repeatedly with the broom before dragging him to the sidewalk and knocking him unconscious. Now it's Francis who's being punished, as he sits in the Delaware County Prison on $100,000 bail, charged with aggravated assault and related offenses.
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
TERRELLE GREENE isn't ashamed to tell about his run-in with a raccoon that gave him a stare-down one day in his North Philadelphia neighborhood: "I ran!" Greene, 19, said the raccoons are so bold and unafraid, they practically stand up on their rear legs, hold their front paws up, at the ready, and "look at you as if to say, 'Bring it on!' "If you go up to 19th and York around 11 p.m., I guarantee you a raccoon is going to grab your leg," he said. Greene was one of several residents on 18th Street near Susquehanna who said roving packs of raccoons have taken over.
SPORTS
June 14, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Read the U.S. Open's players guide closely and you can learn a lot. Very often more than you really wanted to know. Brandt Jobe, for example, lost parts of two fingers in a garage accident. Not just any garage accident. He was sweeping its floor with a broom. Jobe apparently is a very vigorous sweeper, because the broom shattered and he lost the tips of his left index finger and thumb, and much of his desire to help out around the house. Fortunately, employing the "lift, clean, and play" rule with which he is so familiar, he scooped up the digital bits, put them in a baggie, and proceeded to the hospital.
SPORTS
June 12, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
If the U.S. Golf Association truly wanted to make this a throwback Open, they should have had the golfers dress the way their predecessors at Merion did. People would pay good money, after all, to see Angel Cabrera in plus-fours. If inspiration was required, the golfers need only to have looked at the huge photos of previous champions festooning this tournament's commercial areas. Bobby Jones wore knickers, a long-sleeved white shirt, and a tie for many of his Merion moments, which may explain why he also needed several corn-whiskey highballs after each of his Prohibition-era rounds.
SPORTS
September 7, 2012 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
IT'S A BIG DEAL, this retiring as an Eagle. Brian Dawkins, worn out and regal, did it. Brian Westbrook, bless his heart, took his knees out of the game in green, too. In fact, at the ceremony to officially mark the end of Tra Thomas' career, the running joke was: "When is Donovan's retirement as an Eagle going to come?" Sooner than later, it appears. The NFL Network announced Wednesday that McNabb will join the network this season. As an analyst. Not as a quarterback.
SPORTS
July 20, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
The new pseudo-sports keep flying at us, as fast as Phillies injury updates, major winners from Northern Ireland, and altered Flyers philosophies. Rugby sevens, twenty20 cricket, mega-ramp skateboarding, netball, disc golf, stunt-pogoing, BMX, UFL, UFC, MLL . . . S-T-O-P! It's time we whittled them to a more manageable number. Here are some simple tips for doing just that: We can do without any sport . . . that has "synchronized" in its name. This stuff should be confined to dinner theaters.
SPORTS
June 24, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Just when the Washington Nationals were showing signs of success and stability, and just as the players were starting to talk about the growing respect for the franchise around the league, along came the surprise announcement that manager Jim Riggleman was quitting because he wasn't happy with his contract. The Nationals completed a sweep of the Seattle Mariners yesterday afternoon, winning, 1-0, in the bottom of the ninth on Laynce Nix's sacrifice fly. They have won 11 of 12 and have moved above .500 this late in the season for the first time since 2005.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
My husband and I jumped the broom on Juneteenth 1983. Translated, that means my husband and I wed on June 19, 28 years ago. It also means both of us are old, but that's probably fodder for an AARP column. The point is, both Juneteenth and the broom hold important cultural and historical significance among American Americans. The centuries-old tradition of jumping the broom stems back to slavery, when enslaved African Americans, whose masters often prohibited them from marrying, ceremoniously jumped over broom, symbolizing settling into a new life together.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By GREG BRAXTON, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The makers of "Jumping the Broom" are looking for a leap of faith. One of those other films opening this weekend against the powerhouse "Thor," the African-American comedy about two socioeconomically opposite families who clash when they meet at a lavish wedding appears at first glance to be a lightweight contender. The low-budget Tristar Pictures release has no A-list stars, is not in 3-D and lacks any characters with the superhero strength of the hammer-wielding Norse god. But the creative forces behind "Jumping the Broom" have their own hammer to throw down, determined to prove that black films with educated and ambitious characters belong in the mainstream Hollywood arena, even though most studios have dialed down development of films with predominantly African-American casts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2011 | By ROGER MOORE, The Orlando Sentinel
"Jumping the Broom" is like a Tyler Perry movie with polish. An ensemble comedy about a wedding that joins a wealthy, Martha's Vineyard family of African-American professionals with the groom's more down-to-earth, working-class Brooklynites, it is well-cast, well-played, passably written and filmed in the warm glow only the top-drawer cinematographers can achieve. And if this T.D. Jakes project (he produced it) lacks the scruffy, hit-or-miss outrageousness of Perry's down-home Atlanta farces, it compensates with heart, smarts and a confident air that Perry's pictures lack.
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