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Bruce Graham

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2010
In his native Philadelphia, Bruce Graham is best known as the prolific and acclaimed author of numerous plays, including "Burkie," "Early One Evening at the Rainbow Bar & Grille," "Moon Over the Brewery," "Belmont Avenue Social Club" and "Coyote on a Fence," which won the Rosenthal Prize and two Drama Desk nominations (and whose staging in London's West End starred Ben Cross, of "Chariots of Fire" fame). His efforts have been recognized with two Barrymore Awards (the local equivalent of the Tonys)
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
People always want to talk about the political themes in his play Minor Demons, Bruce Graham said, but he wishes they would pay more attention to the relationships between characters. The play is really about friendship, he said. "The procedural stuff is just to drive the plot. " Minor Demons, a drama that explores what happens to the bond between a defense lawyer and a police chief when a murder case pits them against each other, is one of two plays by Graham that are running on local stages this month.
NEWS
May 5, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The opening question to the playwright was pro forma: "What is your new play about?" Bruce Graham knew the question would be asked, and he launched eagerly into his reply. "I'll tell you what it's about. It's in your paper," said Graham, a tone of amazement tinging his voice as he reached for a newspaper in his briefcase. " . . . This is so bizarre. It's about a murder case of a 15-year-old kid murdering a 13-year-old kid. " Graham opened the paper and pointed to the story of the arrest of 14-year- old Kenneth Houseknecht in the death of 12-year-old Kim Marie Anderson in Deptford Township.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Theater Critic
"Early One Evening at the Rainbow Bar & Grille," a new comedy by Bruce Graham. Directed by Gloria Muzio, set by Eric Schaeffer, lighting by Curt Senie, costumes by Vickie Esposito, sound by Jeff Chestek. Presented by the Philadelphia Festival Theatre for New Plays and the Annenberg Center at the Harold Prince Theatre, 3680 Walnut St., through Dec. 21. Sooner or later every young playwright of comedic bent is tempted to write an end-of-the-world script. Bruce Graham, the author of a fine play called "Burkie" that premiered a couple of seasons ago under the auspices of the Philadelphia Festival Theatre, bit on the notion, and the finished product was laid on the world last night in the first co-production ever between the PFT and the Annenberg Center.
NEWS
February 12, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before noting what Bruce Graham's new comedy Devious Means is all about, let's make clear that it is a highly amusing, witty comedy that a high-energy production at Villanova University accords its full due. Graham's theme is America's fascination with personalities and heroes, especially as manifested through television. The play is set in a suburban Philadelphia diner near a mall where a mass shooting occurs. One of the characters worries that her mother may have been a victim.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
I loved Bruce Graham's hard-hitting comedy Any Given Monday when Theatre Exile gave it its 2010 world premiere. Delaware Theatre Company's furious production confirmed my original assessment: I still love it. It's my kind of play. But that alone wouldn't persuade my family to hike to Wilmington to catch this riveting rendition. So below, three reasons why any theater lover should see this play. It deals with real life. Too many couples these days cheat or divorce. More than two-thirds of the time, men don't initiate the latter process.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2001 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Produced by the defunct Philadelphia Festival for New Plays in 1984, Burkie was Bruce Graham's first play. Well-received then, it was hailed as a harbinger of the talent that was to turn Graham into the area's best-known playwright. Revisited 17 years later in its first professional local revival by Theatre Exile at the Walnut Street Theatre's Studio 3, Burkie can be appreciated as more than just an impressive first effort; it's a good play, period. Burkie is an emotionally intense family drama that - with the help of this strong production - taps deeply into the humanity of its characters and touches the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
That ker-CHUNK! you're hearing after the storm isn't confined to the clots of snow falling from trees and rooftops. You can sense the sound inside Plays & Players Theatre, too, where Bruce Graham's terrific new Any Given Monday, a funny and mesmerizingly dark adventure set in a family room somewhere in Philadelphia, is in its world premiere. At the theater, what's falling onto the stage and crashing to pieces is more fragile even than snow. It's a moral code. And maybe it's making a more shattering sound - like the crashing of those tablets Moses is said to have dropped.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2004 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In his book Adventures in the Screen Trade, Oscar-winning screenwriter William Goldman observed that "nobody knows anything," widely regarded as the most knowledgeable assessment of the way things do and don't work in Hollywood. Bruce Graham, the playwright who has forged a successful second career in Tinseltown despite defiantly staying home near Media, learned the wisdom of Goldman's celebrated observation a few years ago. Disney flew Graham to Los Angeles for a script meeting at its headquarters and put him up at a suitably baronial hotel.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Most screenwriters get their inspiration in the Hollywood Hills, but Bruce Graham prefers his own little hill in Rose Valley. In fact, the Ridley Senior High School graduate won't budge from Delaware County. "They'll bury me here," he said. "Hopefully, I'll be dead. " Graham's plays have been produced in Philadelphia and on stages around the country. His TV pilots have aired on CBS. He has an agent in California who lands him movie script deals. He has worked with big-time movie stars.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
I loved Bruce Graham's hard-hitting comedy Any Given Monday when Theatre Exile gave it its 2010 world premiere. Delaware Theatre Company's furious production confirmed my original assessment: I still love it. It's my kind of play. But that alone wouldn't persuade my family to hike to Wilmington to catch this riveting rendition. So below, three reasons why any theater lover should see this play. It deals with real life. Too many couples these days cheat or divorce. More than two-thirds of the time, men don't initiate the latter process.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | Michael Harrington
Sunday What is to be lost In Bruce Graham's textured drama The Outgoing Tide, a flinty patriarch comes up with a plan to deal with his diminishing capacities, laid out to his reluctant wife and beleaguered son at the family's cabin on the Chesapeake. The Philadelphia Theatre Company production goes on at 3 p.m. Sunday at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre, Broad and Lombard Streets, and continues with shows at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, 1 and 7 p.m. Wednesday, 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. next Sunday.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For the Inquirer
Bruce Graham's fine new play, The Outgoing Tide, at the Philadelphia Theatre Company, is deeply moving and surprisingly funny, a straight-talking, unpretentious meditation on Alzheimer's and end-of-life suffering: "Quality of life. Kiss my ass. " Directed with invisible finesse and strength by James J. Christy, the excellent cast provides bedrock realism, refusing any of the topic's maudlin possibilities. The fact is, Gunner (Richard Poe), a tough guy who ran a trucking company and dealt with the Teamsters, is losing his memory and his mind; he still has enough left to plan his exit, refusing to settle for years of humiliating deterioration in a "home.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Nuance - the shadows and creases that provide depth and richness - is what makes the Off-Broadway production of Any Given Monday so different from its world-premiere version last year in Philadelphia. Philadelphia playwright Bruce Graham has reworked a bit of his striking, funny play, which overturns commonly held values in order to celebrate the very notion of values. But that's only partly why Any Given Monday differs in overall effect from its first productions at Theatre Exile in Center City, then Act II Playhouse in Ambler, joint producers of its premiere.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2010
In his native Philadelphia, Bruce Graham is best known as the prolific and acclaimed author of numerous plays, including "Burkie," "Early One Evening at the Rainbow Bar & Grille," "Moon Over the Brewery," "Belmont Avenue Social Club" and "Coyote on a Fence," which won the Rosenthal Prize and two Drama Desk nominations (and whose staging in London's West End starred Ben Cross, of "Chariots of Fire" fame). His efforts have been recognized with two Barrymore Awards (the local equivalent of the Tonys)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
That ker-CHUNK! you're hearing after the storm isn't confined to the clots of snow falling from trees and rooftops. You can sense the sound inside Plays & Players Theatre, too, where Bruce Graham's terrific new Any Given Monday, a funny and mesmerizingly dark adventure set in a family room somewhere in Philadelphia, is in its world premiere. At the theater, what's falling onto the stage and crashing to pieces is more fragile even than snow. It's a moral code. And maybe it's making a more shattering sound - like the crashing of those tablets Moses is said to have dropped.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When playwright Michael Whistler arrived for a session with Wyndmoor family therapist Abby Ruder earlier this year, it was hardly your typical hour - more like four. And Whistler didn't even have personal issues that needed a going-over. What he had was the script for Little Lamb, now in previews and opening Wednesday in its InterAct Theatre Company world premiere. It tackles, in a blend of issues of the sort that has become an InterAct hallmark, multiple themes: adoption, in this case gay adoption; building transracial families; and bigotry based on stereotypes in Latino, African American, gay, and religious communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2004 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In his book Adventures in the Screen Trade, Oscar-winning screenwriter William Goldman observed that "nobody knows anything," widely regarded as the most knowledgeable assessment of the way things do and don't work in Hollywood. Bruce Graham, the playwright who has forged a successful second career in Tinseltown despite defiantly staying home near Media, learned the wisdom of Goldman's celebrated observation a few years ago. Disney flew Graham to Los Angeles for a script meeting at its headquarters and put him up at a suitably baronial hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2001 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Produced by the defunct Philadelphia Festival for New Plays in 1984, Burkie was Bruce Graham's first play. Well-received then, it was hailed as a harbinger of the talent that was to turn Graham into the area's best-known playwright. Revisited 17 years later in its first professional local revival by Theatre Exile at the Walnut Street Theatre's Studio 3, Burkie can be appreciated as more than just an impressive first effort; it's a good play, period. Burkie is an emotionally intense family drama that - with the help of this strong production - taps deeply into the humanity of its characters and touches the audience.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
People always want to talk about the political themes in his play Minor Demons, Bruce Graham said, but he wishes they would pay more attention to the relationships between characters. The play is really about friendship, he said. "The procedural stuff is just to drive the plot. " Minor Demons, a drama that explores what happens to the bond between a defense lawyer and a police chief when a murder case pits them against each other, is one of two plays by Graham that are running on local stages this month.
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