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Bruce Lee

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NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Paula Fuchsberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a wall in Norman Constantine's room hangs a poster of Bruce Lee, that powerful character from the old martial arts movies. It seems only fitting. After all, Norm Constantine was always a pretty powerful character himself. For two years a decade ago, the handsome, 6-foot karate black belt reigned as the colorful Nittany Lion mascot at Pennsylvania State University. Off the field, his tireless array of activities instructing, coaching and bringing cheer to disabled people would make the President's schedule look leisurely.
SPORTS
October 4, 2011 | By Michael Vitez, Human-interest writer
Nobody else could sell pistachios. Others tried. Just Pistachio Girl. She parted the seas, the standing-room-only crowds at Citizens Bank Park on Sunday night, and bounced down the aisles, a cult figure. Art Ehlo, 58, a season-ticket holder down the third-base line, gave her a fist bump. "I've got pictures of her in my phone with me," he said. Debbie Brown, an usher in Section 136, took a photo. "She's fascinating," Brown said. "She's part of this ballpark. There's a whole page for her on Facebook, 'Fans of The CBP Pistachio Girl.' " More than 500 people "like" it. Pistachio Girl has no idea who started it. In Section 116, a desperate voice rang out, "I love you, Pistachio Girl!"
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
By creepy coincidence, the Bruce Lee biopic "Dragon" arrives just weeks after the bizarre death of his son Brandon, an event that had eerie parallels to Lee's mysterious demise in 1973. The timing becomes even more chilling as "Dragon" unspools. A conventional biography in most respects, the movie does make a spooky digression into mysticism and seems to anticipate the tragic link between father and son. "Dragon" maintains that throughout his life, Lee was haunted by terrifying dreams, reflecting anxiety over a shadowy fear he could not name.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | by Jaclyn D'Auria, For the Daily News
Lou Gaul's eyes light up whenever he talks about his favorite action-movie actor - Kung Fu Master Bruce Lee. He chuckles when he recalls all the times his family and friends scolded him for getting carried away with his fascination with the martial-arts expert. Gaul, the film critic for the Burlington County Times, Calkins Newspapers and Philadelphia radio talk station WWDB-FM, has turned his passion into his first book, "The Fist That Shook The World: The Cinema of Bruce Lee," published in April.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | Inquirer photos by Michael Mally
It's easy to get the impression that martial arts - judo, karate, tae kwan do - come entirely from the Far East. There are, however, exceptions. A demonstration of one, Krav Maga, an Israeli self-defense system, was held recently at the Franklin Mills mall in Northeast Philadelphia. A geographer might point out that Israel technically is in Asia. That's true, but it's still a long way from Bruce Lee's one-time hangouts. Of course, so is Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Actor Jim Kelly, 67, who played a glib American martial artist in Enter the Dragon , with Bruce Lee, died of cancer Saturday at his home in San Diego, his ex-wife Marilyn Dishman said. Sporting an Afro hairstyle and sideburns, Mr. Kelly made a splash with his one-liners and fight scenes in the 1973 martial-arts classic. His later films included Three the Hard Way, Black Belt Jones , and Black Samurai. During a 2010 interview with Salon.com, Mr. Kelly said he started studying martial arts in 1964 in Kentucky and later moved to California where he earned a black belt in karate.
LIVING
October 12, 1986 | By Richard Zacks, Special to The Inquirer
Forget about young Republicans; this country is loaded with karate kids. We're talking about a wave of interest in martial-arts films the likes of which hasn't been seen since karate expert Bruce Lee died in 1973. After garnering $90 million at the box office in 1984, The Karate Kid (1985, RCA/Columbia, $79.95) sold an impressive 180,000 videocassettes last year. And this summer's sequel, The Karate Kid Part II, ranks as a genuine smash hit in theaters. Success certainly isn't limited to family-oriented films a la Karate Kid. More violent, "chop-socky" films are grabbing general audiences as well as their cult fans - especially the "ninja" films.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Martial arts demonstrations and exhibits on health care will be featured in an Aug. 17 program in Almonesson. The program, which will begin at 7 p.m. in Auletto's Ballroom, on Cooper Street, will be highlighted by an appearance by Gin Foon Mark, a teacher of the late martial arts expert and movie star Bruce Lee. Although health care and martial arts may seem unrelated, they are often intertwined, said Martin Eisen, a martial arts instructor who...
NEWS
November 29, 1993 | Daily News wire services
ROYAL OAK, MICH. KEVORKIAN FORCED OUT OF HIS HOME Police ejected Dr. Jack Kevorkian and a guest from his apartment last night and barred him from it for more than 90 minutes as they searched it, the suicide doctor said. "Is this going to happen every time someone visits me who (the police) don't know?" Kevorkian asked as he sat with his lawyer at a restaurant near his apartment. Kevorkian said that nearly two hours after the search began, police were refusing to let him back into the apartment or give him any information about the search.
NEWS
August 21, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Since the death of Bruce Lee, the martial arts genre has been without a king. The closest thing to a successor is Steven Seagal, a hulking brute whose trademark limb-breaking and massive body blows made him the leading chock- socky icon during the power-obsessed '80s. Seagal, however, has lately talked of doing more meaningful pictures (yawn) and has clearly lost his taste for action. That leaves a void, one that martial-arts lovers would like to see filled by someone with the exuberant charisma and frenetic martial arts style of Lee. That is clearly the genesis of "Rapid Fire," a movie starring Lee's son, Brandon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2014 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
ON OCT. 22, 1996, Kathy Chang doused herself in gasoline and set herself on fire in front of the peace-sign sculpture on the University of Pennsylvania college green. The 46-year-old social activist protested in that same spot on campus for 15 years, waving flags and wearing brightly colored, diaphanous costumes, to call for change - something she wanted so deeply, she added an "e" to her surname and often called herself "Kathy Change. " Soomi Kim is exploring the life of Chang in her upcoming show, "Chang(e)
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE AD CAMPAIGN for "The Grandmaster" features a blurb from Martin Scorsese praising the movie for being "arranged with elegance. " Did he get the CliffsNotes? I had a much harder time with the arrangement of Wong Kar Wai's new kung fu, World War II (former) epic. The movie I saw looked like it had been made from a script dropped into a blender, made into a puree for quick consumption. Of course, the version I saw ran 109 minutes - 20 minutes shorter than the version available in China, and reportedly three hours shorter than the director's original cut. The subtitled U.S. version has the telltale fingerprints of Harvey Weinstein (massive voice-over explainers)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
W. KAMAU Bell was never one of those kids who walked around with a pretend microphone, improvising banter with some imaginary bandleader. "I wanted to have a comedy show," the host of FX's "Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell" said in a recent phone interview. In September, "Totally Biased" moves to FX's spin-off network, FXX, and expands from one to five nights a week - four originals with a best-of show on Sundays - a development that has the comic a little nervous. "Pretty much all of it worries me. I was just getting used to one day a week" on FX, said Bell, who's bringing his "Totally Biased Standup Tour" to Philadelphia's Prince Music Theater on Friday.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Actor Jim Kelly, 67, who played a glib American martial artist in Enter the Dragon , with Bruce Lee, died of cancer Saturday at his home in San Diego, his ex-wife Marilyn Dishman said. Sporting an Afro hairstyle and sideburns, Mr. Kelly made a splash with his one-liners and fight scenes in the 1973 martial-arts classic. His later films included Three the Hard Way, Black Belt Jones , and Black Samurai. During a 2010 interview with Salon.com, Mr. Kelly said he started studying martial arts in 1964 in Kentucky and later moved to California where he earned a black belt in karate.
SPORTS
October 4, 2011 | By Michael Vitez, Human-interest writer
Nobody else could sell pistachios. Others tried. Just Pistachio Girl. She parted the seas, the standing-room-only crowds at Citizens Bank Park on Sunday night, and bounced down the aisles, a cult figure. Art Ehlo, 58, a season-ticket holder down the third-base line, gave her a fist bump. "I've got pictures of her in my phone with me," he said. Debbie Brown, an usher in Section 136, took a photo. "She's fascinating," Brown said. "She's part of this ballpark. There's a whole page for her on Facebook, 'Fans of The CBP Pistachio Girl.' " More than 500 people "like" it. Pistachio Girl has no idea who started it. In Section 116, a desperate voice rang out, "I love you, Pistachio Girl!"
SPORTS
September 7, 2010 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
He may be small at 5-foot-9, 200 pounds, but middle linebacker Brucelee Sterile throws big hits. The Lincoln University junior, known to fans as the "Mighty Miniature One," routinely overpowers linemen 100 pounds heavier and is called "the pulse of our team" by his coach. "Since he's been here, he's probably been one of the most intense student-athletes I've ever been around, from class work to on the field," Lions coach O.J. Abanishe said. "What I mean by intense is, whenever he is doing something, it's 100 percent.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2008 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
TATTLE HAS heard a lot of bizarre questions asked at movie press events, but someone asking 77-year-old Clint Eastwood if had any plans to return as "Dirty Harry" is right up there. Eastwood said at a Cannes press conference for his new missing-child movie, "The Changeling," starring Angelina Jolie, that Harry Callahan was probably retired by now and he was not interested in bringing him back to the big screen. Then Jolie chimed in: "I am. " "Dirty Harriet and the 'Tomb Raider' will play it," Eastwood joked.
NEWS
May 13, 2008 | By Kita S. Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ask BET's Reginald Hudlin why mixed martial arts is the newest muse among BET's reality television offerings, and he will take you back to tales of rooting for the greatest fighters to ever step into a ring. "You know when we were kids, the question of whether Muhummad Ali or Bruce Lee would win in a fight? Well, mixed martial arts can answer that today," said Hudlin, 46, president of entertainment for BET. "I have followed the Ultimate Fighting Championship since my brother [Warrington]
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2007 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
"Jungle Girl" is one of the more pleasant surprises of 2007. When this book was announced, many felt it would be simply another T&A book that would distinguish itself with some Frank Cho covers. However, the results so far have been impressive. While Jana, the star of "Jungle Girl," does not quite match her fellow Dynamite hellion, Red Sonja, in the toughness or nastiness department, and while her stories have not been quite as epic as those starring the She-Devil With a Sword, she comes darn close.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2006 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IF PAMELA Anderson and Kid Rock can't make it work, what hope is there for the rest of us? The pneumatic pinup and the stringy-haired rocker each filed divorce papers yesterday seeking to end their marriage of less than four months. It seems that once the three-month honeymoon ended, all that was left were the "irreconcilable differences. " Pam's rep had no comment on the matter, but Pam wrote on her Web site, "Yes, it's true," adding the cryptic: "Unfortunately impossible.
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