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Bruschetta

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2012
Company line: Grilled chicken breast seasoned with bruschetta, parsley and Italian cheeses on crispy onion and peppers with fried potatoes. Topped with scampi and Bolognese sauces. Chain: Applebee's. Calories: The Bruschetta Chicken had a reasonable (for Applebee's) 850 calories, but 43 grams of fat and 2,760 mgs of salt. The Crunchy Onion Ring Appetizer started off the meal with 1,290 calories, 56 grams of fat, 3,620 mg of salt and an incredible 181 grams of carbohydrates.
FOOD
March 1, 2012
Makes 4 appetizer servings 1/2 cup roasted tomatoes    (loosely packed), chopped 2 tablespoons minced red    onion 1 tablespoon chopped    tarragon or basil leaves 1/2 teaspoon red wine    vinegar 1/8 teaspoon red pepper    flakes (optional) 1 tablespoon extra-virgin    olive oil, plus more for    drizzling over bread Salt and freshly ground    black pepper to taste 8 slices toasted Italian bread    or baguette 1 garlic clove, peeled 1. In a mixing bowl, combine the tomatoes, onion, tarragon or basil, vinegar, red pepper flakes and 1 tablespoon of the oil and toss to blend.
FOOD
April 15, 1992 | By Bev Bennett, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Spring is a perfect time to enjoy fresh spinach. It goes well with many things, but is really special in dishes with cream, milk and cheese. We've taken the idea of cream of spinach soup and blended it with the concept of Oysters Rockefeller (which uses spinach), substituting scallops, a more delicate mollusk that's suited to cream dishes. The result is Scallop and Spinach Soup, an easy-to-make dish given color with fresh red bell pepper. A perfect accompaniment for this soup is bruschetta, the bread snack that's the rage in Italian restaurants.
FOOD
January 1, 1995 | By Mary Carroll, FOR THE INQUIRER
After the hubbub of New Year's Eve, New Year's Day is refreshingly quiet. Friends and family drop by, everyone's a little tired, but the atmosphere is still holiday. Several years ago I hit upon a party menu that was a real success - both for the cook and the company. A warm, spicy, nonalcoholic drink to serve by the fire, crunchy bruschetta - little toasts - with ricotta and roasted red peppers, and a platter of vegetarian fajitas with two salsas. I could purchase dessert, and if I felt extra energetic, add a salad platter.
FOOD
September 25, 1996 | by Merilyn Jackson, For the Daily News
The weather's cooling down, the economy is holding steady and the function season is heating up. At weddings, bar mitzvahs, corporate events, Christmas parties and other events, we'll be dressing to the nines and having luscious little bites of food offered to us by caterers. Some of those foods we'll recognize: shrimp, rumaki (the official name for liver and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon), mini-hot-dog "pigs" in fattening pastry "blankets," baby quiches, stuffed cherry tomatoes.
NEWS
June 18, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to food, few restaurants can match the scrumptious dishes at Fellini Cafe Trattoria in Newtown Square. But service at the tiny, overcrowded strip-shopping-center restaurant can be more hilarious than an Abbott and Costello movie, proving that there's more to a restaurant than just food. Fellini opened in late November as a larger but otherwise almost exact duplication of the restaurant with the same name and menu in Ardmore. The new place is always crowded, I was told, and I believe it. The night I visited, dozens of people waited on the sidewalk for up to an hour for a table.
FOOD
July 26, 1998 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Some of the best-written menus can spark in me a fierce wanderlust. Often, it is the mere mention of an ingredient - a jerk spice rub, a musky sauce of pumpkin seed, a piquant olive salad meant for muffuletta - that will set me to daydreaming of my next vacation. Name a few destinations, as they do at Chestnut Hill's Solaris Grille, where images of French Champagne country, the Jamaican coast and Hong Kong are invoked alongside beurre blancs, plantains and dumplings, and forgive me for hoping that somewhere in this worldly kitchen a hearth of culinary knowledge will bring to my table - if not a plane ticket, at least a hint of those distant flavors.
NEWS
January 23, 2005 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cutillo's Restaurant & Lounge in Sanatoga has a name that typifies many old landmarks. The massive Victorian structure is family owned, it's multipurpose in its dining scene (complete with takeout), and it sits hard by the road, its rooftop sign easily seen from nearby Route 422. This might be the era of "small" plates and fashionable comfort food, but there's still room for the Cutillos of the world. I must concede that I chose to dine at Cutillo's partly because it has been open since 1948.
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
It has been months since the Miss America competition, but losing still stings a bit for the reigning Miss New Jersey. In part, because of the controversy that surrounded the winner, Kate Shindle, whose father served on the Miss America board. "It is very strange which is maybe why I don't really have closure with it yet," Kathy Nejat said earlier this week. Not that she's sitting around crying over spilled milk. Since the pageant, Nejat, 21, has been busy fulfilling her duties as Miss New Jersey, visiting schools and making speeches promoting arts education for youngsters.
FOOD
July 10, 2008 | By Caroline Berson, Inquirer Staff Writer
When I was growing up, my family would take weekend camping trips in West Virginia a couple of times a year. My mom, who was a great cook at home, somehow managed to maintain her gourmet standards on the road. But I never paid attention to what she was doing. Her wonderful meals seemed to appear magically out of thin air, even without resources such as refrigeration and running water. Now, when I go camping with friends, I can pitch a tent, recognize constellations, and build a decent fire.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Alison Ladman and Associated Press
It's easy to love basic bruschetta — thick slabs of toasted bread topped with a heap of chopped tomatoes and shredded basil, then drizzled with olive oil. But that heap of tomatoes and dribbling oil don't exactly make for great picnic packing. So for a more portable take with the same great flavors, we transformed our favorite bruschetta into a cool couscous salad. Perfect for a picnic, Israeli-style couscous actually is small pasta balls. If you can't find it, feel free to substitute another small pasta.
FOOD
March 1, 2012
Makes 4 appetizer servings 1/2 cup roasted tomatoes    (loosely packed), chopped 2 tablespoons minced red    onion 1 tablespoon chopped    tarragon or basil leaves 1/2 teaspoon red wine    vinegar 1/8 teaspoon red pepper    flakes (optional) 1 tablespoon extra-virgin    olive oil, plus more for    drizzling over bread Salt and freshly ground    black pepper to taste 8 slices toasted Italian bread    or baguette 1 garlic clove, peeled 1. In a mixing bowl, combine the tomatoes, onion, tarragon or basil, vinegar, red pepper flakes and 1 tablespoon of the oil and toss to blend.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2012
Company line: Grilled chicken breast seasoned with bruschetta, parsley and Italian cheeses on crispy onion and peppers with fried potatoes. Topped with scampi and Bolognese sauces. Chain: Applebee's. Calories: The Bruschetta Chicken had a reasonable (for Applebee's) 850 calories, but 43 grams of fat and 2,760 mgs of salt. The Crunchy Onion Ring Appetizer started off the meal with 1,290 calories, 56 grams of fat, 3,620 mg of salt and an incredible 181 grams of carbohydrates.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Casino restaurants have supplied much of the fresh energy in years past to fuel the northern end of the Philly-centric Jersey Shore. But given the late and expensive openings in Atlantic City this season - including a pair with entrées prices hovering in the $40s - it seems Casino Land has turned back inward to its high rollers rather than courting summer beachgoers with dining mass appeal. Consider it a lingering sign of the sluggish economy - one that's reflected in quieter-than-usual new-restaurant action from Long Beach Island to just south of Ocean City, where I spent many of my meals revisiting the region's classic tastes and spaces.
FOOD
July 10, 2008 | By Caroline Berson, Inquirer Staff Writer
When I was growing up, my family would take weekend camping trips in West Virginia a couple of times a year. My mom, who was a great cook at home, somehow managed to maintain her gourmet standards on the road. But I never paid attention to what she was doing. Her wonderful meals seemed to appear magically out of thin air, even without resources such as refrigeration and running water. Now, when I go camping with friends, I can pitch a tent, recognize constellations, and build a decent fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2007
CHAIN RESTAURANTS are famous for portions that create the contestants on "Fat March," but there's a trio of eateries that make the main courses at the Cheesecake Factory seem like small plates at a tapas restaurant. The Chain Gang, which usually appears every other Friday in the Daily News , bursts into the Yo! Food section this week because we've burst out of our clothes after a week of eating pasta by the pound. Maggiano's, Vinny T's and Buca di Beppo offer portions that would make a giant blush, so the Chain Gang did its own Fat March - except we drove - to see how these "Big Italian" restaurants stacked up against each other.
NEWS
January 23, 2005 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cutillo's Restaurant & Lounge in Sanatoga has a name that typifies many old landmarks. The massive Victorian structure is family owned, it's multipurpose in its dining scene (complete with takeout), and it sits hard by the road, its rooftop sign easily seen from nearby Route 422. This might be the era of "small" plates and fashionable comfort food, but there's still room for the Cutillos of the world. I must concede that I chose to dine at Cutillo's partly because it has been open since 1948.
NEWS
June 18, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to food, few restaurants can match the scrumptious dishes at Fellini Cafe Trattoria in Newtown Square. But service at the tiny, overcrowded strip-shopping-center restaurant can be more hilarious than an Abbott and Costello movie, proving that there's more to a restaurant than just food. Fellini opened in late November as a larger but otherwise almost exact duplication of the restaurant with the same name and menu in Ardmore. The new place is always crowded, I was told, and I believe it. The night I visited, dozens of people waited on the sidewalk for up to an hour for a table.
NEWS
February 13, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You could easily be fooled by its mundane name, but the food, atmosphere and service at Philly Crab & Steak House in Warminster are so superb that it doesn't matter what name they give to this sparkling new restaurant. Building on the success of his first Philly Crab that opened four years ago at Grant Avenue and Academy Road in Northeast Philadelphia, Steve Clark took over a former Hardshell Cafe (it was a LuLu Wellington's before that) on York Road and opened a duplicate of his original restaurant in December.
FOOD
July 26, 1998 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Some of the best-written menus can spark in me a fierce wanderlust. Often, it is the mere mention of an ingredient - a jerk spice rub, a musky sauce of pumpkin seed, a piquant olive salad meant for muffuletta - that will set me to daydreaming of my next vacation. Name a few destinations, as they do at Chestnut Hill's Solaris Grille, where images of French Champagne country, the Jamaican coast and Hong Kong are invoked alongside beurre blancs, plantains and dumplings, and forgive me for hoping that somewhere in this worldly kitchen a hearth of culinary knowledge will bring to my table - if not a plane ticket, at least a hint of those distant flavors.
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