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NEWS
July 11, 1992 | By Ryan Murphy, FOR THE INQUIRER
It was a moment neither Jean-Claude Van Damme nor the international paparazzi corps are likely to forget. There he was, The Muscles from Brussels, walking up a set of theater steps in Cannes side by side with his Universal Soldier co-star Dolph Lundgren, the Sulking Swede. From the point of view of 500 or so shutterbugs, the photo opportunity was no big deal. But then, the unthinkable happened. The Sulking Swede pushed - pushed! - the Muscles from Brussels. Not to be outdone, the Muscles from Brussels tried to flatten the Sulking Swede with a trademark 180-degree drop kick.
NEWS
December 18, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
American arms shipments to Iran far exceeded the amount acknowledged by President Reagan, whose administration was also holding secret contacts with Libya at the very time it was vehemently denouncing the regime of Moammar Gadhafi for its support of terrorism, according to reports published in two European newspapers yesterday. At least 12 planeloads of U.S. weapons to Iran were secretly loaded in Belgium, the Brussels newspaper Le Soir reported, contradicting President Reagan's assertion that the total American arms deliveries to Iran did not exceed one plane's capacity.
NEWS
March 24, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin
MOLENBEEK, Belgium - Four days before Tuesday's grisly bomb attacks in Brussels, the police raided a shabby three-story brick row house in this heavily Moroccan working-class district of Brussels. There they captured Salah Abdeslam, the last surviving member of the terror group that killed 130 people in Paris in November.Abdeslam had eluded police for four months and no one in Moleenbeek betrayed him. Nor did anyone warn police about Tuesday's plans to bomb Brussels' airport and metro.
NEWS
April 30, 1991 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like folks all over Europe, the people of Britain have long been unsure precisely what the coming of the single, 12-nation European market at the end of next year may mean to them. Now they know. No more "prawn cocktail"-flavored potato chips. This most unnatural of food items, the third-most-popular snack in Britain, is targeted for elimination throughout the European market in a directive issued from Brussels by the European Community's department for industry. The directive in question, designed to limit the use of artificial sweeteners, prohibits their use after January 1993 except in a list of specified foods.
NEWS
October 12, 1987 | By TONI LOCY, Daily News Staff Writer
Six Philadelphia defense lawyers, a federal prosecutor and two Drug Enforcement Administration agents will be spending at least a week in Belgium next month, all courtesy of Uncle Sam. The entourage is going to the U.S. Embassy in Brussels to take depositions from 10 European witnesses. Federal prosecutors say they need the depositions to make an important part of the case against reputed mob boss Nicodemo "Little Nicky" Scarfo and 27 others charged with conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine and conspiring to possess and distribute phenyl-2-propanone, or P2P, which is used to manufacture meth.
NEWS
April 18, 1993 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joab Thomas, president of Pennsylvania State University, and James McCormick, Pennsylvania's chancellor of higher education, will discuss the need for a qualified workforce at the Eye-opener Breakfast of the Chester County Chamber of Business and Industry on April 28 at 7:44 a.m. at J&J Caterers in Exton. Madeleine Wing Adler, president of West Chester University, will moderate. The cost of the breakfast is $10 for members and $15 for nonmembers. For information, call 436-7696.
FOOD
February 23, 2012
BRUSSELS, Belgium - The biggest drawback in traveling with a pack of beer fanatics on a pilgrimage to Belgium is that they take the term liquid bread too seriously. True, this is the land where the phrase was coined by brewing monks who drank their yeasty treasures as sustenance while fasting. But this Philly Beer Week crew is following that holy example to an unexpectedly impressive degree, as visits from one fantastic brewery to the next blend with one must-see, back-alley, Renaissance-era tavern after the other with nary a mention of lunch.
NEWS
December 24, 1999 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eva H. Gelernter, 61, a survivor of the horrors of Nazi occupation who went on to become a social worker after reaching the United States, died Wednesday of colon cancer at Keystone Hospice House in Wyndmoor. Before requiring hospice care a few weeks ago, Ms. Gelernter had been a longtime resident of Center City. Born in Brussels in 1938, Ms. Gelernter escaped the Nazi police state in Belgium with her family, crossing into France in 1942 before reaching America in 1951. They first settled in Chicago, but within a short time moved to Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
In the wake of the ISIS atrocity in Brussels, it's time to reflect on the meaning of John Kerry's recent statement that the group has committed a genocide against Yazidis. It is certainly true that ISIS has done its best to wipe out members of the ancient monotheistic religion, killing thousands of men, enslaving women and children, and creating roughly 400,000 refugees. But what good does a State Department declaration do for women and girls who escaped ISIS captivity after months of being raped daily, or the thousands who remain enslaved?
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
Does the West still exist? And do we need it? Those are questions many British citizens are asking as their country prepares for a June 23 referendum on whether Britain should remain in the European Union. Or to put it another way, are the European institutions that America and Britain worked together to create after World War II, and that brought the continent decades of peace, still relevant? And would Britain be better off on its own? For anyone with a historic memory dating back two decades, the question is shocking.
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