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NEWS
June 25, 2010
A Vienna court backs American VIENNA - An Austrian judge sent a case involving allegations of police brutality by a black American to a higher court, saying the matter was too serious to be handled by her district court. After a day of testimony from both sides and an expert witness, Judge Margaretha Richter said the case needed to go to a provincial court. She said that based on the testimony, the undercover officer acted improperly in tackling 36-year-old Mike Brennan to the ground in a Vienna subway station on Feb. 11, 2009, severely injuring him. Police said they mistook Brennan for a drug dealer they were looking for. Brennan, a teacher at the Vienna International School, welcomed the judge's decision and remarks, saying they sent a message.
NEWS
November 26, 2008
Last week's Inquirer Food section offered suggestions on wines for Thanksgiving and recipes for citrus roasted turkey, stuffed turkey breast, glazed brussels sprouts and pan gravy. Plus, read Craig LaBan's recipe for "The Incredible Barbecued Bird. " Go to and click on the Restaurants & Food link.
NEWS
November 20, 2008
With a nod, a wink, and a flying foot jab, Jean-Claude Van Damme appears as Jean-Claude Van Damme in this meta-action pic, a smoothed-down satire in which the Muscles from Brussels finds himself back in his hometown - and in a hostage situation when he stumbles on a robbery in progress at a neighborhood post office. Van Damme's career in ruins (Steven Seagal, who has cut off his ponytail, is getting Van Damme's parts), and broke from fighting an ugly custody battle back in L.A., the moody Belgian is mistaken for the perpetrator of the heist.
FOOD
November 6, 2008
You can find sulfurous, ping-pong-ball-size brussels sprouts just about anytime. But it wasn't until a week or two ago that we started seeing our favorites from fall's new Lancaster County crop back in the markets - tight, heaping-teaspoon-size fellas that are reliably superior in flavor and texture. Slice them in half (lengthwise), brown them in butter, douse with sherry vinegar and a bit of olive oil and behold the brussels sprout at its finest - caramelized, sweet and nutty. - Rick Nichols A clever bird The tail of this sweet little songbird is a bottle opener, while its underbelly is ridged to handle twist-off tops.
NEWS
August 15, 2008 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kurt D. Volker, the new American ambassador to NATO, has many things big and small on his mind these days: the Russian invasion of Georgia, the war in Afghanistan, and the fate of a quilt that hangs in the borough hall of Hatboro, Pa., U.S.A. Volker, a career foreign service officer and a native of the Montgomery County borough, took over as America's representative to NATO last month, just in time for the North Atlantic alliance to become engulfed in an explosive crisis unfolding in the former Soviet state of Georgia.
NEWS
February 15, 2007 | By Lisa Pupo
She was black. I'm white. She lived in the city. I'm from the suburbs. I didn't know her, and she didn't know me. Yet when she offered to drive me back to where I had left my car, I barely hesitated. And I had my 6-year-old daughter with me. This might sound like a teaser for Cold Case Files or a spot on the nightly news, but it had a happy ending. Trust me. We had wandered many blocks from our car in search of a Korean market, and finally landed in front of a small grocery store whose produce was displayed on the sidewalk.
NEWS
May 22, 2005 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Global chemical giant Rohm & Haas has its headquarters in Philadelphia, but the political deliberations it is most concerned about these days aren't happening at City Hall, or in Harrisburg, or even in Washington. They are happening here, in the capital of the European Union. EU officials are preparing to impose sweeping new chemical rules requiring the industry to prove that certain substances are safe, rather than wait for conclusive evidence that they are not. And Rohm & Haas will have no choice but to comply, because the company earns a quarter of its $7 billion in annual revenue selling products in Europe.
NEWS
May 27, 2004 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The symptom of a good concert at Amsterdam's venerable Concertgebouw, which has been one of the world's greatest halls since it opened in 1888, is not a standing ovation. "They do that for everybody," explained one veteran Dutch concertgoer as the audience rose at the end of the Philadelphia Orchestra's performance of Mahler's Symphony No. 1 on Sunday. One theory claims the concert hall's seats were so uncomfortable until recently that standing ovations were prompted by the audience's simple desire to stand.
FOOD
November 13, 2003 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
So many small children pass through tiny Bacchus Market in Fitler Square that owner Tracey Wolfson has become something of an expert on feeding Brussels sprouts to kids. Her principal strategy is not to lie, per se, but simply to communicate another version of the truth: "Just tell them sprouts are 'baby cabbages.' " I know more than a few grown-ups who could benefit from rethinking their view of Brussels sprouts, too. But who can blame anyone who was traumatized early on by a bowl of those infamously odoriferous golf balls overcooked to a dull green and ripe with sulfur?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Sometimes it takes a thief to catch a thief. Sometimes it takes a victim to catch an assailant. So the stylish thriller Gender Bias, a French-Belgian coproduction, suggests. As a serial killer maims and murders transsexual prostitutes in Brussels, Bo (Robinson St?venin) - a fetching trannie in vintage Chanel - hunts down the perp. It's a tough job, thanks to the police lieutenant (Richard Bohringer) who fingers Bo herself as the self-hating killer. It's made tougher since apparently every man in Brussels thinks he's entitled to rough up transsexuals because of "false advertising.
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