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Brutality

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
John Frankenheimer's new version of The Island of Dr. Moreau arrives in the centennial year of the H.G. Wells story's publication. With the designing of genes now a real-world controversy instead of a prescient 19th-century fantasy, it might seem time for an update. For the first half of The Island of Dr. Moreau, Frankenheimer makes his case, but as soon as the demented genius passes from the scene, sense and coherence quickly follow. Dr. Moreau (Marlon Brando) is the first to admit his work on the South Pacific island is in its experimental stages.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2000 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Martin Sherman's play Bent is a story of love that develops within the brutally murderous atmosphere of a Nazi concentration camp. This makes it a tricky piece to stage. The problem is that brutality is easy to depict. Evoking a feeling of connection and love between two characters is more difficult, and the Hunger Theatre production doesn't manage this very well. The love story leaves the theatergoer emotionally cold, and because the cruelty of the SS has a stronger impact, we are denied the pleasure of feeling a moral victory over the play's collection of particularly awful Nazis.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | By Robert J. Terry and Michael B. Coakley, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two Philadelphia police officers, one of them the rookie brother of a former officer awaiting trial for murder, were suspended from the force yesterday and face dismissal on brutality charges, officials said. Paul Hunt, 20, and Marcellus Robinson, 26, both assigned to the 22d District, were awaiting arraignment at the Police Administration Building last night on a variety of charges that investigators said stemmed from the beatings of two suspects the pair took into custody on separate occasions.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Call her madam? You wouldn't dare. Call her mad. And Dora's not the only gal at Amsterdam's Happy House brothel who's steamed. The male proprietor thinks he can boost revenues by introducing sadomasochism to the menu of attractions. Dora thinks this is redundant in a house where every day the johns get more callous. Doubly redundant in a society where men don't have to pay for the privilege of abusing women. For example, take the serial killer who abducts and tortures staid matrons, then stuffs their corpses into garbage bags and dumps them into the sludge of an abandoned canal.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Local NAACP officials said yesterday that they will probe about 40 cases of alleged brutality by city police officers during the last 18 months. Nearly all the cases involve white police officers injuring black suspects during arrests, said Ellis Carr, an NAACP board member who heads an East Wilmington citizens' group called Eastlawn Area Human Services. Carr said the NAACP will form a committee of 15 people, from NAACP members and Wilmington community leaders, to interview the alleged brutality victims.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By David Lee Preston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three sons of Brooklyn, N.Y., each held court separately yesterday in a stately old hotel in this depressed city that once was a resort mecca for New Yorkers. The Rev. Al Sharpton, a leader of this summer's massive black protests in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, advised an NAACP public hearing that the state should create an office to investigate police brutality. Gov. Florio, assured a much larger luncheon audience in a chandelier-lit ballroom at the NAACP's annual state conference that his administration would "devise and enforce guidelines" on police brutality.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Law enforcement agencies in the South were a major target of complaints to the federal government about police misconduct from 1984 to 1990, according to a Justice Department study made public yesterday. However, the study analyzed fragmentary data and has limited importance, department officials said. Still, a House Judiciary Committee analyst said it did reveal "a real Southern cast. . . . A lot of the police brutality problems appear to be in Southern and border states.
NEWS
August 25, 1991 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Two Elkins Park brothers are claiming Cheltenham police brutalized them during their arrest July 17, 1990, for disorderly conduct. In a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Montgomery County Court, Christopher B. Vahey, 22, contends that while he was handcuffed, Officer John P. Slavin repeatedly beat him with a nightstick on his arms, legs and back. His brother, Harold M. Vahey, 27, claims in the lawsuit that Officer Robert Dougherty struck him with a flashlight, ordered the police dog to attack and bite his face and right leg, and then kicked him. After Harold Vahey was handcuffed and bleeding, the suit charges, Dougherty pushed and shoved him, injuring him further.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
It's been called the video that shocked America. But for some Americans, particularly those of African and Hispanic descent, the tape of Los Angeles police officers beating a black man was not surprising. This was a graphic, brutal picture of the Other America, the one most whites never experience. It was a blurry video, shot in the dark, with some illumination from the patrol cars' lights. But the picture remained all too clear. Rodney G. King, a 25-year-old black man, lay on the ground handcuffed while above him stood more than a dozen white police officers.
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NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
A 59-year-old North Philadelphia man who died Sunday was the city's third heat-related fatality this weekend and the seventh of the summer, according to the city's Department of Public Health. The man, whose identity and address were not released, died from the heat and from complications related to congestive heart failure and diabetes, said Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the city's Department of Public Health. Two other people, an 82-year-old Port Richmond woman and a 67-year-old woman from Brewerytown, died on Saturday of heat-related complications and cardiovascular disease, the Department of Public Health said.
NEWS
August 1, 2016
Marcus Allen is the CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters Independence Region In Pedagogy of the Oppressed , Brazilian author and scholar Paulo Freire states, "No one can be authentically human while he prevents others from being so. " I've been thinking a lot lately about this idea of humanity, and who is afforded the privilege of being perceived as fully human. In recent months we too often watched as black men and women had their lives taken at the hands of police, and we also witnessed the murder of police officers.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Joseph Jaafari, Staff Writer
As temperatures surged into the upper 90s on Saturday and the swelter meter hit unbearable, Philadelphians - families, couples, and friends - took to Center City's fountains for relief. It's a scene likely to be repeated for days to come, with the intense heat expected to last through the week. "It's a great way to watch the kids playing," said Kareema Hall, 43, of Center City, who was sitting at the Fountains at Logan Square with another Center City resident, Vernon Battle, 50. About a dozen children splashed in the geysers shooting from the ground.
NEWS
July 22, 2016
It was the start of the 2016 ESPY Awards and there were four superstars onstage - LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane Wade and Chris Paul - standing extra tall as they spoke out against police brutality and called on their fellow athletes to do the same. It was a powerful moment. All those multi-millionaire athletes. Each his own mega-brand. Standing up for something besides just getting richer and winning NBA championships. My favorite part was when James, dressed in a classic black tuxedo, gazed into a camera and said, "It's time to look in the mirror and ask ourselves, 'what are we doing to bring about change?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2016
Beyoncé's naughty politics Have a wardrobe malfunction at the Super Bowl and you'll live to see another day. But woe unto the artist who comes onto the field with a political message. Woe to Beyoncé , whose Super Bowl 50 performance apparently was saturated with a pro-black power and anti-cop political subtext that has angered many a football fan and quite a few politicos, including former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani . Giuliani told Fox & Friends on Monday that Bey's performance of her new song "Formation," which was released Saturday, was anti-police.
NEWS
February 3, 2016
Police are searching for three men who were caught on video brutally assaulting a 29-year-old man inside a Chinese restaurant in the city's Logan section late Saturday night. In the video, released by authorities Monday, the men can be seen pushing the victim inside Lucky Garden Chinese Food at 4901 N. Broad St. around 11:40 p.m., then pummeling him with punches to the face, chest, and back. One of the attackers stabbed the victim multiple times with a knife, police said. Before leaving, police said, the assailants took the victim's watch and belt.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's official snowpack from the weekend megastorm is better than 60 percent gone. So far, the record snowfall has been followed by what has to be one of the gentler melts on record, with dry days of temperatures well into the 40s and a benign outlook the rest of the week. "It's exactly the way you want to melt snow," said Jared Klein, a lead forecaster at the National Weather Service Office in Mount Holly. For those living on sun-deprived streets or on hills to the north and west of the city, expect to keep bonding with winter wonderland.
SPORTS
November 6, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam Bradford watched the footage of the Eagles' Week 2 loss to the Dallas Cowboys this week. It caused the type of cringe-worthy reaction reserved for a woebegone high school yearbook photo. "Hasn't gotten any prettier," Bradford said. He could say that about more than just the Cowboys game. Bradford spent the early portion of the bye week scrutinizing film from the season. Then he returned to his native Oklahoma to clear his head. He's back in Philadelphia to prepare for a nine-game stretch that will not only determine whether the Eagles make the postseason, but also whether he will last with the Eagles beyond this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Ayad Akhtar's smart, brutal drama Disgraced will be the most-produced play in the country this season. Philadelphia Theatre Company gets the first local crack at it, with a visually satisfying but stiff production. But then again, this is a play all about how nothing is quite what it seems. Amir (Pej Vahdat), a handsome, successful mergers-and-acquisitions lawyer, is a secular Muslim version of Don Draper. Running from what he considers a shameful past, he has taken a new name, new nationality, and a blond, white, painter wife, Emily (Monette Magrath)
NEWS
October 17, 2015
ISSUE | CRIME AND RACE Stop the violence and police brutality Less-than-thoughtful conversations about crime and policing that lack a racial-justice lens only serve to perpetuate stereotypes of black criminality and enable acts of police criminality ("Race, crime, and police: A closer look," Sunday). When opponents of justice reform and the Black Lives Matter movement raise the specter of "black-on-black" crime, they hope to end discussions of police brutality. They would justify heavy-handed policing and deadly use of force against unarmed black people by claiming that their race is a criminal element.
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