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Brute Force

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The historic fable Adanggaman, an extraordinary film from the Ivory Coast, is set in an Arcadian, 17th-century fishing village. In this unspoiled setting an entire tribe is trapped by warrior women and coerced into slavery by their soulless leader, Adanggaman, an African Nero who would laugh and dance as his people burned. Fortified by greed and the rum that is currency for Dutch slave traders, this profiteer of people enjoys the clanging music of the tribesmen in chains as much as he does the rhythms of his drummers.
SPORTS
January 15, 1989 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Wings coach Dave Evans says it sometimes take brute force to get Paul French's attention. "You have to hit him over the head with a two-by-four to get him into a game," Evans said. "He was there tonight. " French, who spent most of last season on the bench for the Wings while scoring only seven goals, had five last night as the Wings defeated the expansion New England Blazers, 19-8, before 16,269 fans at the Spectrum - a Major Indoor Lacrosse League record for attendance.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2007 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
The Brooklyn, N.Y., garage-punk trio the Yeah Yeah Yeahs has never included a bass player, and Thursday's concert at the Electric Factory showed why: There's no room. With guitarist Nick Zinner off to one side and drummer Brian Chase in the back, the band's singer, Karen O, whirled, jumped and rolled around every remaining inch of stage. Woe to anyone who stands in her way. Dressed somewhere between Cabaret's Sally Bowles and Daryl Hannah in Blade Runner, Karen O pounded on her stomach like she was trying to exorcise demons, or maybe rouse them.
SPORTS
August 3, 2015 | By Jesse Dougherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - They stepped into the ring at 10:09 p.m. Saturday, Danny Garcia with a career ahead of him, and Paulie Malignaggi with a career to save. Their contrasting styles, personalities, and career arcs clashed at the Barclays Center, and Garcia won by technical knockout in the ninth round. Garcia, the undefeated 27-year-old, was looking to punch his way closer to superstardom. Malignaggi, 34, was looking to, if for just for one night, disprove the prevailing opinion that he should have retired 16 months ago. Garcia (31-0, 18 KOs)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | By David Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia has never been Glamour Central — its audiences don't need that sort of thing — but the orchestra's status certainly wasn't hurt by a triple dose of that commodity over the weekend. Opera star Jessye Norman unexpectedly delivered an unaccompanied spiritual at Saturday's Lifetime Achievement Award Gala, which also came with a performance by her superb protégé, Canadian mezzo-soprano Susan Platts. On Sunday at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater, the orchestra's concluding concert program of the season (repeated Monday at Perelman, and to be heard again Tuesday at the Temple Performing Arts Center)
SPORTS
July 16, 2005 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Day 2 of the British Open, Tiger Woods roared once more. While millions of golf fans were captivated by the sentimental conclusion here to Jack Nicklaus' grand career, the No. 1 player in the world was busy shooting a 5-under-par 67. That gave him a 36-hole total of 11 under and a 4-shot lead over favorite son Colin Montgomerie. Like his first-round 66 Thursday, Woods' trip around the Old Course yesterday was a thing of beauty and brute force. Brute force because he drove the green on three par 4s: the 352-yard ninth hole, the 380-yard 10th and the 348-yard 12th.
NEWS
February 1, 1986 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Guinan, 87, first president of the National Veteran Boxers Association and last survivor of the Police Department's "Little Mob," died yesterday at his daughter's home in Warminster. He lived in South Philadelphia. A prototype of sorts, he was raised in the city's Grays Ferry section. One of 17 children, he grew up fighting. He had his first official bout at age 13. He fought Young O'Brien at the Broadway area in an exhibition promoted by Herman Taylor. But there were objections at home.
NEWS
September 2, 2002 | By Fredric Hamber
It is fitting that the most productive nation on earth should have a holiday to honor its work. The high standard of living Americans enjoy is hard-earned and well-deserved. But the term "Labor Day" is a misnomer. What we should celebrate is not sweat and toil, but the power of the human mind to reason, invent and create. So, it is worth asking: Why do Americans have no holiday to celebrate the creators, inventors and entrepreneurs who have made all of this wealth possible - the masters of the mind?
SPORTS
February 7, 1986 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
Gaining a nickname is one thing. Being suffocated by it is quite another. Roman's Michael Jackson began to have that problem during the meteoric rise of an album called "Thriller" by the Michael Jackson. He could not possibly have counted how many people called him "Thriller" during the course of a day. Determining the number of times he was hit with the nickname in a 15-minute period was problematic enough. "I didn't mind always being called 'Thriller' too much, but sometimes it did get on my nerves," Jackson said, laughing.
SPORTS
June 12, 1986 | By JOE GREENDAY, Daily News Sports Writer
Andy North, the defending champion, picks Calvin Peete to win the 86th U.S. Open. Why Peete? Well, if you have been salmon fishing in Alaska for the last few years, you might not know that the self-taught Calvin Peete is clothesline straight off the tee. He has led the PGA Tour in driving accuracy and greens hit in regulation almost since he began chasing the likes of Jack Nicklaus and Tom Watson in 1975. Peete's style is well-suited for Shinnecock Hills, where the Open begins today.
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SPORTS
October 30, 2015 | Bob Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer
THE MAIN STORY that developed for the 76ers in their season-opening loss to the Boston Celtics was the play of rookie Jahlil Okafor, and rightfully so. The third overall pick has Sixers faithful salivating with his 26-point effort, which included the type of nimble footwork and brute force he showed during his national title run in his one season at Duke. Okafor torched Celtics starting center Tyler Zeller, making his first five shots against him. The rookie's offensive success forced Boston coach Brad Stevens to bring burly Jared Sullinger off the bench to try to slow down Okafor.
SPORTS
August 3, 2015 | By Jesse Dougherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - They stepped into the ring at 10:09 p.m. Saturday, Danny Garcia with a career ahead of him, and Paulie Malignaggi with a career to save. Their contrasting styles, personalities, and career arcs clashed at the Barclays Center, and Garcia won by technical knockout in the ninth round. Garcia, the undefeated 27-year-old, was looking to punch his way closer to superstardom. Malignaggi, 34, was looking to, if for just for one night, disprove the prevailing opinion that he should have retired 16 months ago. Garcia (31-0, 18 KOs)
SPORTS
October 2, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com
YOU WOULD BE hard-pressed to find a high school player in Philadelphia with a more physically imposing style of football than Shawn Henderson. Actually, gridder more aptly describes the George Washington High senior middle linebacker and fullback. A 5-10, 230-pound battering ram, Henderson couples keen instincts and brute force to disrupt on both sides of the ball. In fact, last week against Father Judge, Crusaders defenders were heard shouting, "No. 3's in the game, tighten up your gaps," when Henderson thundered onto the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | By David Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia has never been Glamour Central — its audiences don't need that sort of thing — but the orchestra's status certainly wasn't hurt by a triple dose of that commodity over the weekend. Opera star Jessye Norman unexpectedly delivered an unaccompanied spiritual at Saturday's Lifetime Achievement Award Gala, which also came with a performance by her superb protégé, Canadian mezzo-soprano Susan Platts. On Sunday at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater, the orchestra's concluding concert program of the season (repeated Monday at Perelman, and to be heard again Tuesday at the Temple Performing Arts Center)
SPORTS
September 25, 2007
IT SEEMED LIKE just the typical coach-player back and forth over a contract holdout. A year ago at training camp, when Eagles coach Andy Reid was asked about rookie defensive tackle Brodrick Bunkley catching up after missing 2 weeks of training camp he responded: "I'd want to think that [he could]. But, the track record of that position and holdouts is not good over the last 9 years. Or, let me say this, the last nine guys that have been drafted at that spot that have held out - it has not been a good thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2007 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
The Brooklyn, N.Y., garage-punk trio the Yeah Yeah Yeahs has never included a bass player, and Thursday's concert at the Electric Factory showed why: There's no room. With guitarist Nick Zinner off to one side and drummer Brian Chase in the back, the band's singer, Karen O, whirled, jumped and rolled around every remaining inch of stage. Woe to anyone who stands in her way. Dressed somewhere between Cabaret's Sally Bowles and Daryl Hannah in Blade Runner, Karen O pounded on her stomach like she was trying to exorcise demons, or maybe rouse them.
SPORTS
July 16, 2005 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Day 2 of the British Open, Tiger Woods roared once more. While millions of golf fans were captivated by the sentimental conclusion here to Jack Nicklaus' grand career, the No. 1 player in the world was busy shooting a 5-under-par 67. That gave him a 36-hole total of 11 under and a 4-shot lead over favorite son Colin Montgomerie. Like his first-round 66 Thursday, Woods' trip around the Old Course yesterday was a thing of beauty and brute force. Brute force because he drove the green on three par 4s: the 352-yard ninth hole, the 380-yard 10th and the 348-yard 12th.
NEWS
September 2, 2002 | By Fredric Hamber
It is fitting that the most productive nation on earth should have a holiday to honor its work. The high standard of living Americans enjoy is hard-earned and well-deserved. But the term "Labor Day" is a misnomer. What we should celebrate is not sweat and toil, but the power of the human mind to reason, invent and create. So, it is worth asking: Why do Americans have no holiday to celebrate the creators, inventors and entrepreneurs who have made all of this wealth possible - the masters of the mind?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The historic fable Adanggaman, an extraordinary film from the Ivory Coast, is set in an Arcadian, 17th-century fishing village. In this unspoiled setting an entire tribe is trapped by warrior women and coerced into slavery by their soulless leader, Adanggaman, an African Nero who would laugh and dance as his people burned. Fortified by greed and the rum that is currency for Dutch slave traders, this profiteer of people enjoys the clanging music of the tribesmen in chains as much as he does the rhythms of his drummers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1993 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
Her music isn't pretty. Julianna Hatfield, who led the Julianna Hatfield Three through a rocky set at the Trocadero on Thursday night, drapes her songs with ragged noise. Her lyrics are raw, emotional snapshots of suburban teen angst. And Hatfield's fragile voice rises to a forced shout when she's reaching to express anger, frustration or joy. It's only her stage presence - unaffectedly shy and tentative - that could be called endearing or even cute. Playing to a packed room, Hatfield relied on brute strength to make the connection with her songs and her audience.
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