CollectionsBryan Adams
IN THE NEWS

Bryan Adams

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 12, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
An 18-month stay in Jamaica and the French Riviera is enough to perk up any Canadian, but it made rock superstar Bryan Adams ready to take on the world. If the 36-year-old Adams is not sporting a deep tan, it's because he spent his days hard at work recording his ninth album, "18 Til I Die," released this month as part of his plan to take on the world. His first studio album in five years, "18 Til I Die" is vintage Adams, a battle between the balladeer and the fist-pumping rocker.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1994 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So, he makes John Mellencamp seem like a deep thinker, and late-model Rod Stewart sound like a vital soul man. And he's the mastermind behind some of the most comically cliche-ridden heartland rock songs ever written. But that Bryan Adams? Sure seems like a nice guy. An honest work ethic, amiable stage presence and crackerjack band only get you so far, however. "Yeah, I'm smaller in real life," Adams joked early on at the Spectrum on Friday night, and boy, did he get that right.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | By Faith Quintavell, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Only a handful of rock stars' live performances are best appreciated in an arena, and Bryan Adams proved Friday that he is still a member of that hard- working and earnest bunch. Despite a five-year interim between tours and the inclusion of some tepid new material, his performance before a near-capacity Spectrum crowd was as energetic and solid as those of the mid-'80s. Adams' pristine renditions of anthemic, radio-ready favorites such as "One Night Love Affair," "Run to You" and "Cuts Like a Knife" still sparkled.
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | By David Hiltbrand, Special to The Inquirer
Bryan Adams has given up the plaid lumberjack shirts he used to wear in concert. But he still gives admirably workmanlike performances. At the Spectrum Tuesday night, the Canadian rocker turned in a generous, well-paced set that offered a fine retrospective of his many hits. And with Philadelphia's own Tommy Conwell and the Young Rumblers as the opening band, the concert was a satisfying - albeit exhausting - exercise in basic rock. Along with four backing musicians, Adams played on a bare stage without props, an appropriate setting for his powerful but uncluttered style.
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bryan Adams, the raspy-voiced Canadian rocker who headlines tonight at the Spectrum, was fighting off a bad case of sequelitis. You know, the affliction that befalls recording artists, film producers and authors when they hit on a good thing and then just fashion a variation on that good thing (and maybe affix some Roman numerals to it) and release the rehash to an unsuspecting public that goes out and gobbles it up with glee. Last year, in the wake of Restless - Adams' 1984 album, which sold seven million copies and spawned six Top 20 singles, the singer-songwriter-guitarist headed back to his Vancouver home.
SPORTS
December 3, 2001 | By Kristian Pope INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It has been quite a ride - by bus, train and car - for senior St. Joseph football players Bryan Adams and James Hargrave. Yesterday, the two friends celebrated St. Joe's third straight NJSIAA state Parochial 1 championship after a 49-0 blowout victory over Immaculate Conception of Montclair. It's likely the duo will be celebrating even more since they played in their last high school game. That means their 26-mile commute every day from Pleasantville to Hammonton is almost over.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Music Critic
When British singer-songwriter Billy Bragg started to talk about pop star Bryan Adams at Chestnut Cabaret on Tuesday, his intentions were not immediately clear. But the capacity crowd, accustomed to Bragg's free associations and his rants about "dead guys' radio," went along. Bragg complained about Adams' 16-week run atop the British singles chart with "(Everything I Do) I Do It for You. " The crowd cheered. He spoke of setting up an underground force to stake out record stores and discourage the Bryan Adams-bound.
SPORTS
February 16, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Steve Maltais scored three goals and Rob Brown added three assists as the Chicago Wolves defeated the Phantoms, 5-1, last night at the First Union Spectrum. Bryan Adams and Darcy Hordichuk also scored for Chicago (27-20-5-3), which won its third straight and extended its unbeaten streak to seven games. Pavel Brendl had the only goal for the Phantoms (25-14- 13-4), who are winless in their last three contests. "[Chicago] had us on our heels from the get-go," said Phantoms head coach John Stevens.
SPORTS
February 16, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Steve Maltais scored three goals and Rob Brown added three assists as the Chicago Wolves defeated the Phantoms, 5-1, last night in an AHL game at the First Union Spectrum. Bryan Adams and Darcy Hordichuk also scored for Chicago (27-20-5-3), which won its third straight and extended its unbeaten streak to seven games. Pavel Brendl scored the only goal for Philadelphia (25-14- 13-4), which is winless in its last three games. Maltais recorded a natural hat trick by scoring three straight goals to snap a 1-1 tie. Maltais' first goal came on the power play with 36.5 seconds left in the first period, when he chipped a pass from Brown over Phantoms goalie Maxime Ouellet.
LIVING
August 23, 1997 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
"I Wanna Be Your Underwear" sounds like a silly joke told in bed, or something said by Prince Charles to Camilla Parker-Bowles on his car phone. It is, in fact, a song on Bryan Adams' most recent CD, 18 'Til I Die (A&M), released in 1996. It was on the set list, unfortunately, for Adams' concert at the Waterfront Entertainment Centre in Camden on Wednesday night. And certainly it didn't deserve illustration on stage. But there it was anyway: a pair of three-story-high, inflatable female torsos, clad only in glowing, blinking underwear, and jointed at the waist to allow for undulation in time to the music.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2013
In Concert 3680 Walnut St.; 215-898-6701. www.annenbergcenter.org . Red Baraat. $20-$45. 1/26. 8 pm.   2301 Boardwalk, Atlantic City; 609-348-7000. www.boardwalkhall.com . Miranda Lambert. $35-$85. 1/26. 7:30 pm.   227 Bridge St., Phoenixville; 610-917-1228. www.thecolonialtheatre.com . Live at the Fillmore. $20-$25. 1/25. 8 pm. Johnny Winter. $25-$38.50. 1/26. 8 pm.   1853 Wrightstown Rd., Washington Crossing; 215-493-6500. www.crossingvineyards.com . Hot Tunes.
SPORTS
May 19, 2002 | By Josh Egerman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
By watching opponents closely, Bryan Adams is looking more like an elite shot-putter. Except for the shoes. Adams, a St. Joseph senior, wears his Nike high-tops instead of shot-putters' shoes during competition. "I think they look funny," he said. "That's the only reason I don't wear them. " It has not affected him. Neither has his relative inexperience. Adams, who started competing last season, has watched other competitors and added their techniques to his strength to become one of the best in South Jersey.
SPORTS
February 16, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Steve Maltais scored three goals and Rob Brown added three assists as the Chicago Wolves defeated the Phantoms, 5-1, last night at the First Union Spectrum. Bryan Adams and Darcy Hordichuk also scored for Chicago (27-20-5-3), which won its third straight and extended its unbeaten streak to seven games. Pavel Brendl had the only goal for the Phantoms (25-14- 13-4), who are winless in their last three contests. "[Chicago] had us on our heels from the get-go," said Phantoms head coach John Stevens.
SPORTS
February 16, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Steve Maltais scored three goals and Rob Brown added three assists as the Chicago Wolves defeated the Phantoms, 5-1, last night in an AHL game at the First Union Spectrum. Bryan Adams and Darcy Hordichuk also scored for Chicago (27-20-5-3), which won its third straight and extended its unbeaten streak to seven games. Pavel Brendl scored the only goal for Philadelphia (25-14- 13-4), which is winless in its last three games. Maltais recorded a natural hat trick by scoring three straight goals to snap a 1-1 tie. Maltais' first goal came on the power play with 36.5 seconds left in the first period, when he chipped a pass from Brown over Phantoms goalie Maxime Ouellet.
SPORTS
December 3, 2001 | By Kristian Pope INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It has been quite a ride - by bus, train and car - for senior St. Joseph football players Bryan Adams and James Hargrave. Yesterday, the two friends celebrated St. Joe's third straight NJSIAA state Parochial 1 championship after a 49-0 blowout victory over Immaculate Conception of Montclair. It's likely the duo will be celebrating even more since they played in their last high school game. That means their 26-mile commute every day from Pleasantville to Hammonton is almost over.
LIVING
August 23, 1997 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
"I Wanna Be Your Underwear" sounds like a silly joke told in bed, or something said by Prince Charles to Camilla Parker-Bowles on his car phone. It is, in fact, a song on Bryan Adams' most recent CD, 18 'Til I Die (A&M), released in 1996. It was on the set list, unfortunately, for Adams' concert at the Waterfront Entertainment Centre in Camden on Wednesday night. And certainly it didn't deserve illustration on stage. But there it was anyway: a pair of three-story-high, inflatable female torsos, clad only in glowing, blinking underwear, and jointed at the waist to allow for undulation in time to the music.
NEWS
June 12, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
An 18-month stay in Jamaica and the French Riviera is enough to perk up any Canadian, but it made rock superstar Bryan Adams ready to take on the world. If the 36-year-old Adams is not sporting a deep tan, it's because he spent his days hard at work recording his ninth album, "18 Til I Die," released this month as part of his plan to take on the world. His first studio album in five years, "18 Til I Die" is vintage Adams, a battle between the balladeer and the fist-pumping rocker.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1994 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So, he makes John Mellencamp seem like a deep thinker, and late-model Rod Stewart sound like a vital soul man. And he's the mastermind behind some of the most comically cliche-ridden heartland rock songs ever written. But that Bryan Adams? Sure seems like a nice guy. An honest work ethic, amiable stage presence and crackerjack band only get you so far, however. "Yeah, I'm smaller in real life," Adams joked early on at the Spectrum on Friday night, and boy, did he get that right.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | By Faith Quintavell, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Only a handful of rock stars' live performances are best appreciated in an arena, and Bryan Adams proved Friday that he is still a member of that hard- working and earnest bunch. Despite a five-year interim between tours and the inclusion of some tepid new material, his performance before a near-capacity Spectrum crowd was as energetic and solid as those of the mid-'80s. Adams' pristine renditions of anthemic, radio-ready favorites such as "One Night Love Affair," "Run to You" and "Cuts Like a Knife" still sparkled.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Music Critic
When British singer-songwriter Billy Bragg started to talk about pop star Bryan Adams at Chestnut Cabaret on Tuesday, his intentions were not immediately clear. But the capacity crowd, accustomed to Bragg's free associations and his rants about "dead guys' radio," went along. Bragg complained about Adams' 16-week run atop the British singles chart with "(Everything I Do) I Do It for You. " The crowd cheered. He spoke of setting up an underground force to stake out record stores and discourage the Bryan Adams-bound.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|