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Bryant Park

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February 8, 2008 | By Christine Ma INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Although the audience at Project Runway's Fashion Week runway show will find out today which designers, and how many, made it to Bryant Park this season, the rest of us will just have to be in suspense a few more weeks. (The show, which will be telecast in the Bravo finale running Feb. 27 and March 5, starts today at 9 a.m. Inquirer fashion reporter Elizabeth Wellington will be writing live from the New York tents.) For four seasons, fashionistas everywhere have been glued to their TVs once a week to see aspiring designers send their creations down the runway to the criticism and praise of supermodel Heidi Klum, magazine editor Nina Garcia, and renowned designer Michael Kors.
NEWS
February 20, 2008 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the ultimate compliment. This month, Tom and Lorenzo, the celebrated bloggers of Project Rungay, were invited to Bryant Park in New York during Fashion Week, guests of Bravo TV, to watch the Project Runway collections from third-row seats. And while this did not enable them to meet Heidi Klum - "What are you going to do, push Harvey Weinstein out of the way?" - they did wind up feeling like "the Joan and Melissa of Project Runway. " And then they got back on the train to Philly to blog about it. Because, weirdly, this unofficial blog appendage of Bravo's Project Runway, arguably the most New York show on television and certainly one of the gayest, is actually the creation of two guys from Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 30, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
PIGEON-CONTROL PROGRAM TAKES WING IN NEW YORK The '60s are over and hallucinogens are out. So some intrepid New Yorkers are trying a new way to control Bryant Park's out-of-control pigeon population: Planned pigeonhood. "It's a totally voluntary program. Only pigeons who voluntarily eat pigeon birth-control food are participating. No one is force-feeding them," joked Bruce Cohen, a spokesman for the Bryant Park Restoration Corp. But seriously, the powers that be at Bryant Park did try other methods, including sprinkling hallucinogens in the flower beds, hoping freaked-out birdbrains would scare away their more laid-back feathered brethren.
NEWS
October 15, 2010
The American Planning Association (APA) has designated Rittenhouse Square, one of the original five squares in William Penn's "Greene Countrie Towne," as one of the nation's top 10 great public spaces for 2010. The APA said it singled out Rittenhouse Square because of the long-standing tradition of residents' maintaining the park. "We're very excited to name Rittenhouse Square as one of this year's great public spaces," APA chief executive officer Paul Farmer said in a statement. "For Philadelphians and tourists, Rittenhouse Square is a true landmark.
NEWS
September 10, 2010 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - For 17 years, New York Fashion Week in Bryant Park was just as much about previewing next season's styles as it was about balancing hot coffee through crowds, running in high heels on concrete, and crashing runway shows attended by celebrities. But insiders on the first full day of runway shows agreed its new Lincoln Center home - 30 percent larger than Bryant Park - was a sophisticated upgrade for the American Runway. Lincoln Center, on the Upper West Side, feels more like a residential neighborhood - where the streets are wider and taxis have more space to maneuver - than its midtown Manhattan predecessor.
NEWS
September 13, 1994 | by CHUCK ARNOLD, Daily News Staff Writer
We were in the house at the MTV Video Music Awards last Thursday night, but didn't really get to see the show. That's because you don't actually get to sit in the audience when you're covering the awards. Hence, we hung out in some dressed-up dungeon of Radio City Music Hall waiting for the stars to come talk to us (and a host of other international press people) while trying (in vain) to pay attention to the broadcast on a monitor. The conditions kept reminding us that we were not a part of the glamour throng surrounding us, merely there to observe and report.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Laurie Olin says he really meant to retire two years ago. He even had notices sent out to announce he was handing the reins of his Philadelphia-based landscape architecture firm to his partners. But projects kept coming up that he couldn't resist. The grounds of the Barnes Foundation. The Apple campus in Cupertino, Calif. Dilworth Plaza in front of City Hall. So, at 75, Olin is as peripatetic as ever, jetting off to Europe and the West Coast to see clients. On Wednesday, though, he'll take a break from long-haul travels to meet President Obama and receive the National Medal of Arts, in recognition of his lifelong crusade to create tranquil oases that make cities more livable.
NEWS
October 14, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
It's easy to like Rittenhouse Square and the American Planning Association agrees. The educational and professional organization has designated the square - one of the original five squares in William Penn's "Greene Countrie Towne" - as one of nation's top 10 great public spaces for 2010. The APA said it singled out Rittenhouse Square because of the long-standing tradition of residents maintaining the park. "We're very excited to name Rittenhouse Square as one of this year's great public spaces," APA Chief Executive Officer Paul Farmer said in a statement.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia spends less on parks than almost any big city in the nation, so it's not surprising that even Center City's jewel, Rittenhouse Square, is increasingly dependent on the kindness of friends. Without those $50 checks from park lovers, not a single impatiens would be planted in the square's borders, the grass would grow to our calves, and the benches would become heaps of broken slats. These days, however, the support group that keeps the park looking spiffy, the Friends of Rittenhouse Square, is itself in deep trouble.
NEWS
June 22, 1993 | by Lynn Sherr and Jurate Kazickas, From the New York Times
Back at the turn of the century, as Susan B. Anthony entered her 80th year, a colleague in the suffrage wars broached the delicate subject of a memorial after her death. She proposed placing a statue of the distinguished women's rights leader in a park near the Anthony home in Rochester, N.Y. Miss Anthony, as she was known, demurred. "I never can bear to see the statue of a woman exposed to the cold and rain and snow," she explained. "And I don't like to think of one of myself out of doors.
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NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Leanne Italie, ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - The City of New York and Lincoln Center are evicting the invitation-only, twice-yearly Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in a court spat over destroyed trees and displaced park benches. A judge Friday approved a pretrial settlement in a complaint brought by community groups. They objected to the onslaught of the fashion industry at Damrosch Park, a 2.4-acre stretch on the Upper West Side that is adjacent to and managed by Lincoln Center. The groups argued the insular nature of the fashion shows that draw top designers and hundreds of buyers, editors, and journalists violate laws governing public use of the land.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The plan for Dilworth Plaza - to be renamed Dilworth Park - is really two projects rolled into one. At street level, the goal is to create a welcoming civic space where office workers, tourists, and residents can relax in the shadow of City Hall. Down below will be a big, new waiting room for subway riders. Some notable features: To enhance views of City Hall's lavish Beaux-Arts facade, the park was kept uncluttered and largely flat in the center. Like a good neoclassical building, it is symmetrical, with a grass lawn at the north end and a flat water feature at the south.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Laurie Olin says he really meant to retire two years ago. He even had notices sent out to announce he was handing the reins of his Philadelphia-based landscape architecture firm to his partners. But projects kept coming up that he couldn't resist. The grounds of the Barnes Foundation. The Apple campus in Cupertino, Calif. Dilworth Plaza in front of City Hall. So, at 75, Olin is as peripatetic as ever, jetting off to Europe and the West Coast to see clients. On Wednesday, though, he'll take a break from long-haul travels to meet President Obama and receive the National Medal of Arts, in recognition of his lifelong crusade to create tranquil oases that make cities more livable.
NEWS
January 8, 2012
Craig Spencer is CEO of the Arden Group Great cities are often defined by their green spaces. New York's Central Park is perhaps the most famous outdoor space. Millennium Park is one of Chicago's leading tourist destinations. Vancouver's Stanley Park attracts eight million visitors a year. But rarely does an established industrial city get a chance to add what is destined to become a signature green space smack in the center of town. Get ready, Philadelphia: The city is remaking the drab and sterile concrete jungle known as Dilworth Plaza.
NEWS
October 15, 2010
The American Planning Association (APA) has designated Rittenhouse Square, one of the original five squares in William Penn's "Greene Countrie Towne," as one of the nation's top 10 great public spaces for 2010. The APA said it singled out Rittenhouse Square because of the long-standing tradition of residents' maintaining the park. "We're very excited to name Rittenhouse Square as one of this year's great public spaces," APA chief executive officer Paul Farmer said in a statement. "For Philadelphians and tourists, Rittenhouse Square is a true landmark.
NEWS
October 14, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
It's easy to like Rittenhouse Square and the American Planning Association agrees. The educational and professional organization has designated the square - one of the original five squares in William Penn's "Greene Countrie Towne" - as one of nation's top 10 great public spaces for 2010. The APA said it singled out Rittenhouse Square because of the long-standing tradition of residents maintaining the park. "We're very excited to name Rittenhouse Square as one of this year's great public spaces," APA Chief Executive Officer Paul Farmer said in a statement.
NEWS
September 10, 2010 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - For 17 years, New York Fashion Week in Bryant Park was just as much about previewing next season's styles as it was about balancing hot coffee through crowds, running in high heels on concrete, and crashing runway shows attended by celebrities. But insiders on the first full day of runway shows agreed its new Lincoln Center home - 30 percent larger than Bryant Park - was a sophisticated upgrade for the American Runway. Lincoln Center, on the Upper West Side, feels more like a residential neighborhood - where the streets are wider and taxis have more space to maneuver - than its midtown Manhattan predecessor.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia spends less on parks than almost any big city in the nation, so it's not surprising that even Center City's jewel, Rittenhouse Square, is increasingly dependent on the kindness of friends. Without those $50 checks from park lovers, not a single impatiens would be planted in the square's borders, the grass would grow to our calves, and the benches would become heaps of broken slats. These days, however, the support group that keeps the park looking spiffy, the Friends of Rittenhouse Square, is itself in deep trouble.
NEWS
May 12, 2010 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The first anonymous letter arrived in mid-March, postmarked from South Jersey. Titled "DID YOU KNOW??" it sent out an alarm to residents of Rittenhouse Square warning that their lovely historic park was under siege by commercial interests. Facing cutbacks in city funding, the letter stated, the Friends of Rittenhouse Square, a volunteer group that helps pays for the park's upkeep, was considering drastic measures including corporate sponsorships and advertising in the square. While the claims were misleading, the letter aroused real fears and exposed a rift in the storied neighborhood.
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