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Bryn Athyn

NEWS
June 17, 2001 | By Margie Fishman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The classic Speedo bikini briefs were likely not designed for pasty men who like to prance about the beach with their beer guts oozing out. Come to think of it, the only guys these Ziploc briefs look good on are swimmers. So, why then, are some of the boys on the Bryn Athyn swim team demanding a more modest uniform, even it means more drag in the pool? "Speedos really feel like underwear," team member Chase Elder, 11, said. That, as it turns out, is a common sentiment in the region.
NEWS
June 14, 2001 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A group of artists from Montgomery, Bucks and Philadelphia Counties has opened Orchard Artworks at the historic Powell House in Bryn Athyn. More than 35 painters, woodworkers, sculptors, jewelry makers, photographers, fiber artists and glass artisans show and sell their work at the new gallery, organizers said. The 200-year-old Powell House, at 520 Tomlinson Rd., was once the hub of a 68-acre farm and orchard. It is owned by the Bryn Athyn Church. Tracy Cass, gallery founder and director, said the gallery was opened to give the group of mostly local artists and artisans a place to display their creations.
NEWS
June 10, 2001 | By Margie Fishman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Whatever happened to this town's political conscience? That is what Emmy Lou Echols wanted to know in last month's community newsletter. "Did you realize that Tuesday, May 15, was Election Day?" Echols wrote, trying to pile guilt on the borough's 741 registered voters who apparently had other plans. Voter turnout in Bryn Athyn was a disappointing 17 percent in the not-so-compelling primary for the local offices of mayor, tax collector and auditor; for three open seats on Borough Council and four on the school board; and several countywide and statewide judicial primaries.
NEWS
May 10, 2001 | By Margie Fishman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the school board here announced in a local newsletter last month that it would have to enact an earned-income tax and nearly double property taxes next year, even some board members were baffled. The district does not operate any public schools and does not fund public kindergarten. The eight students attending public school do so in neighboring Lower Moreland. That is where the problem came about. According to the announcement, Lower Moreland was "threatening legal action" against Bryn Athyn as a result of $55,000 in back payments owed the district.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | By Margie Fishman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Elizabeth Grubb did not realize that failing to pay a tax worth about the price of a movie ticket would result in her being treated as an outlaw. In a town this small, however, where the weekly newsletter addresses people by their first names, telling the neighbors, it seems, is a good way to get everybody to pay their fair share. In bold, black letters on the door of borough hall are listed the names of last year's 90 tax delinquents. "I'm catching up with it," Grubb said, adding that she was more concerned about mailing her electric bill on time - and having heat - than she was about public humiliation.
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tracy Cass barely knew David Powell. But she knew the half-bushels of peaches and apples stacked next to his old red barn on Tomlinson Road. As a child, Cass recalled, she visited Powell's orchard with her family, and the fruit tasted natural and special. After Powell died in September 1999 at age 92, his stucco-covered stone farmhouse - which local restoration buffs date to the pre-Revolutionary War era - was destined for mothballs. The white paint was peeling, the pine floors were rotting, and the basement resembled a scene from a horror flick, Cass, now 40, recalled.
NEWS
October 16, 2000 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Academy of the New Church College changed its name in 1997 to Bryn Athyn College of the New Church, some members of this small community worried about the implications of moving the institution's religious affiliation to the end of the line. Many students welcomed the decision, said Charles Lindsay, the college dean, because it relieved them of the requisite dissertation on the Swedenborgian faith every time an out-of-towner asked, "Where do you go to school?" The place quickly was nicknamed Bryn Athyn College, which was more sweatshirt-friendly anyway, he said.
NEWS
October 15, 2000 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Shawn Rose talks about dandelion genocide - the eradication frenzy rooted in a nation obsessed with sleek lawns - you cannot help but pity this perennial plant, alternately labeled "puffball" and "swine snout. " After all, however aesthetically repulsive its leafless stalk with a blond afro is, a dandelion has a lot going for it: Reputed to purify the blood and flush toxins out of the body, it also is more nutritious than a carrot, Rose said. So why is Rose, a yard weed's best friend, crouching with about 30 other people on a crisp Friday evening, jabbing his trowel into the moist ground and emerging with a heaping fistful of dandelion guts?
NEWS
September 26, 2000 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In celebration of Cairnwood's christening as a corporate-friendly chateau, most of the guests were sucking on bite-size pastries and toasting the mansion as "absolutely fabulous. " But just past the Grand Hall, where John and Gertrude Pitcairn look-alikes warmly greeted the attendees on a recent Thursday, two event planners from Toll Bros. were skeptical about packing 50 executives into an odd-shaped space called the music room. "It's not sterile and corporate-looking. It's warm and fuzzy.
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | By Margie Fishman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It couldn't have been a sweeter deal for Janet Davis. An older woman contacted the real-estate agent about five years ago, saying she didn't want the hassle of selling her home here on her own, but she would hand Davis a list of four interested buyers. Davis sold the house in two days, but the self-satisfied aura about her quickly disappeared. Bryn Athyn clients, she knew, are rare. "I've got to make money. I'm not going to make it in Bryn Athyn," said Davis, who lives here but primarily sells homes elsewhere in eastern Montgomery County and in Lower Bucks.
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