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Buckingham Township

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NEWS
May 29, 2000 | By Evan Halper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For years, the Pennsylvania courts have looked at farms in rapidly growing suburbs as vacant land ripe for development. In case after case, community leaders who tried to save that open space had to allow intense development elsewhere. Now a Bucks County court judge has thrilled preservationists by turning precedent on its head, ruling that farmland is not vacant at all - it is developed land. Common Pleas Judge John J. Rufe ruled last month that Buckingham Township - with a third of its land still farms and would-be home buyers clamoring to get in - is fully developed, even congested.
NEWS
February 7, 2000 | By Evan Halper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Bucks County judge has ruled the township made illegal and dubious moves to block development of an elderly couple's farm acreage - in a scolding, 60-page opinion that questions the credibility of testimony given by the Bucks County planning chief and other experts contracted by Buckingham. At issue is Buckingham's rejection of a development proposal for the 250-acre Lindquist farm on York Road. Common Pleas Court Senior Judge Ward F. Clark overturned that rejection, saying the township acted in bad faith.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Continuing their effort to stop construction of the Route 202 bypass in Bucks County, Buckingham Township officials filed a lawsuit against the federal government in U.S. District Court late Friday. The lawsuit, which names the Federal Highway Administration and the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission as defendants, is a bid to stop the proposed $250 million, nine-mile highway that would run from Montgomery Township to Doylestown. "The Federal Highway Administration knows of Buckingham Township's opposition to the [Route]
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | By Evan Halper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Highway planners now admit that they manipulated computer traffic counts that showed the proposed Route 202 Expressway would not overwhelm Buckingham with thousands of cars. The planners had insisted in court that the projections were only the computer's, as they sought to disprove Buckingham's claims that they "cooked the books" to win approval for the controversial road. Planners had said there was no way that they could "fix" or tamper with those projections for the $210 million, nine-mile project.
NEWS
January 2, 1997 | By Erin Einhorn, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jeff Lukens had his video camera trained on Austin Dutton, he told police, the evening his pet turkey was mauled and killed by Dutton's pet dogs. Since Dutton moved to this central Bucks township three years ago with his family and several attack-trained rottweilers, Lukens and Dutton have growled at each other across the top of a wire fence. Lukens has called police about Dutton, or the dogs, seven times. Dutton called about Lukens on four occasions. The township has a lawsuit against Dutton, who has a lawsuit against the township.
NEWS
May 12, 1997 | For The Inquirer / BARBARA JOHNSTON
The Royal Lipizzan Stallions showed off Saturday at Stepping Stone Farm in Buckingham Township. Head rider and trainer Gabriella Hermann and her mount perform the Spanish "high school. "
NEWS
January 3, 1996 | By Pam Louwagie, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In response to the development explosion in the northern part of this township, the Midway Volunteer Fire Company plans to build a new station near Route 413 and Cold Spring Creamery Road. Fire company officials expect the new station to speed the response time to some areas of the township by as much as 10 minutes during heavy traffic hours. Traffic has been slowing the company's volunteer firefighters, who have to travel from their homes or offices to the current station near Peddler's Village in Lahaska, then go on to a fire, said George Stover, president of the company.
NEWS
August 29, 2011 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They had been married for 14 years. They lived in a two-story, $300,000 home in a Virginia suburb. They were the parents of a little girl not quite grade-school age. And Leonard and Carrie Egland were part of a culture - the Army - where research shows a relatively low rate of reported domestic violence. Particularly among officers, which Capt. Leonard Egland was. But that idyll disintegrated as the couple separated and neared a final divorce decree. They bickered over custody of their little girl, police said, and Carrie Egland confided to friends that she had grown fearful of her estranged husband.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | By John P. Martin, Special to The Inquirer
She felt like a hostage, the mother of three said, trapped by an abusive boyfriend, by a troubled past and by the belief that she needed psychiatric help but could not get it. Two state hospitals denied her treatment, she said, because she was not homicidal or suicidal, but they unknowingly gave her the solution she sought. "It planted a really stupid idea in my head: that I'd commit a crime in Bucks County, get busted and get help," Sonya Lee Jones told a Bucks County judge yesterday.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Stephen Buchany, 80, formerly of Doylestown Township, a retired supervisor, died Thursday after a long battle with cancer. He died at his daughter's home in Buckingham Township, Bucks County, where he had lived for a year. He worked for General Coating Co. of Woodbridge, N.J., for many years and retired in 1985 after 15 years as a supervisor with Arbonite Co. in Buckingham Township. Born in Hopelawn, N.J., Mr. Buchany lived in Woodbridge, N.J., most of his life. He moved to Doylestown in 1971.
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NEWS
September 4, 2011 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard Egland came home from Iraq in 2009 a changed man, his slain wife's attorney says. And not for the better. Within a year of his return to Fort Lee, Va., the Army captain and his wife were seeking a divorce. He was seeing a psychiatrist, court records show, and was prescribed medication for unspecified mental problems. Above all, he was obsessed by a belief that Carrie Egland, his wife of 14 years, had been unfaithful, according to her lawyer, Rick Friedman. "We really don't know where that came from," Friedman said, adding that he knew of no infidelity in the marriage.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
They had been married for 14 years. They lived in a two-story, $300,000 home in a Virginia suburb. They were the parents of a little girl, not quite grade-school age. And Leonard and Carrie Egland were part of a culture - the Army - where research shows a relatively low rate of reported domestic violence. Particularly among officers, which Capt. Leonard Egland was. But that idyll disintegrated as the couple separated and neared a final divorce decree. They bickered over custody of their daughter, police said, and Carrie Egland confided to friends that she had grown fearful of her estranged husband.
NEWS
August 29, 2011 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They had been married for 14 years. They lived in a two-story, $300,000 home in a Virginia suburb. They were the parents of a little girl not quite grade-school age. And Leonard and Carrie Egland were part of a culture - the Army - where research shows a relatively low rate of reported domestic violence. Particularly among officers, which Capt. Leonard Egland was. But that idyll disintegrated as the couple separated and neared a final divorce decree. They bickered over custody of their little girl, police said, and Carrie Egland confided to friends that she had grown fearful of her estranged husband.
NEWS
August 29, 2011 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Having killed four people in two states, wounded two police officers, and prompted a daylong manhunt amid the havoc of a hurricane, an Army captain from Virginia was found dead in a patch of Bucks County woods Sunday afternoon, apparently from shooting himself. Authorities said they did not know what caused Leonard Egland, 37, of Fort Lee, Va., to kill his wife, mother-in-law, and two others before turning a handgun on himself. His body was found at 3:40 p.m. in a wooded area near Almshouse and York Roads in Warwick Township.
NEWS
August 29, 2011 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They had been married for 14 years. They lived in a two-story, $300,000 home in a Virginia suburb. They were the parents of a little girl not quite grade-school age. And Leonard and Carrie Egland were part of a culture - the Army - where research shows a relatively low rate of reported domestic violence. Particularly among officers, which Capt. Leonard Egland was. But that idyll disintegrated as the couple separated and neared a final divorce decree. They bickered over custody of their little girl, police said, and Carrie Egland confided to friends that she had grown fearful of her estranged husband.
NEWS
August 28, 2011 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After an all-day search, police in Bucks County this afternoon found the body of a U.S. Army captain suspected of murdering four people - three in Virginia, one in Buckingham Township - and wounding two police officers during a late-night shootout in Doylestown. Leonard John Egland, 37, of Fort Lee, Va., was found dead in the brush of a vacant lot near York and Almshouse Roads in Warwick Township at around 3:40 p.m., District Attorney David W. Heckler said. Authorities believe he died from a self-inflicted gunshot.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A veteran circulation manager for the Inquirer and Daily News was killed early Friday in a two-vehicle crash in Bucks County. Gary Shoap, 58, of Richboro, was pronounced dead at the scene after his 2001 Honda CRV was struck broadside by a box truck on Route 202 in Buckingham Township, police said. Shoap, who had worked for the newspapers since 1977, was circulation district manager for upper Bucks County. He was on duty at the time of the crash, said Ed Delfin, home delivery sales director for the newspapers.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A veteran circulation manager for the Inquirer and Daily News was killed early Friday in a two-vehicle accident in Bucks County. Gary Shoap, 58, of Richboro, was pronounced dead at the scene after his 2001 Honda CRV was struck broadside by a box truck on Route 202 in Buckingham Township, police said. Shoap, who had worked for the newspapers since 1977, was circulation district manager for upper Bucks County. He was on duty at the time of the crash, said Ed Delfin, home delivery sales director for the newspapers.
NEWS
April 13, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jill Pistory delivered the grim news on April Fool's Day, and it was no prank. Save for uniformed personnel, the annual April 1 raises were off indefinitely for all Buckingham Township employees. The overall economic climate had been unpleasant enough, but in the new year, a slumping real estate market had approached moribundity in the prosperous Bucks County township, threatening to put further stress on the budget. The 2 to 5 percent raises would have to wait. It is impossible to gauge yet how a weakening market might affect tax revenue over the long haul, but a short-term effect already is showing up in Buckingham and elsewhere.
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