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NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oscar Solomon Bortner, 94, a former Bucks County prosecutor and Common Pleas Court judge, died of natural causes Wednesday, June 24, in his Langhorne home. Mr. Bortner grew up in Philadelphia, where he completed his undergraduate studies at Temple University. After enlisting in the Army in 1943 as a weaponry technician, he completed a law degree at University of Pennsylvania Law School in 1949. His daughter Amy Gialuco remembers her father's time as an amateur actor when she was young.
NEWS
November 23, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man was pronounced dead by New Jersey State Police on Thanksgiving Day shortly after he jumped off the New Hope Toll Bridge along Rte. 202 in Bucks County, police said. Police received the report of a person lying face down in the Delaware River at 1:32 p.m. Rescue units and a dive team were dispatched to the scene, according to Breaking News Network, a firm which monitors police radio traffic. Rescue units lost sight of the floating form until 1:52 p.m., when the man was recovered in full cardiac arrest, the news network reported.
NEWS
February 15, 2016
A fire broke out early Saturday morning at a Bucks County apartment complex, sending two people to a hospital for minor injuries, authorities said. The fire erupted at about 5:20 a.m. at the Foxwood Manor apartments, 2180 Veterans Highway, in Levittown. It was extinguished shortly after 6 a.m., Deputy Chief Robert Johnson of the William Penn Fire Company in Hulmeville said. A man and a woman who lived in one apartment went to a hospital to be treated for smoke inhalation, he said.
NEWS
October 13, 2015 | By Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
St. Joseph the Worker Church in Fallsington, Bucks County, will close permanently on Nov. 1, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced Sunday. St. Joseph the Worker parish merged with St. Frances Cabrini parish in Fairless Hills in July 2014. St. Frances became the primary parish, while St. Joseph remained a worship site for the occasional celebration of Mass as well as funerals and weddings. Now the church will close for good, due to high costs for necessary repairs and underutilization.
NEWS
September 11, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joseph Mannello, 57, of Lower Makefield Township, a well-known Bucks County restaurateur, died Sunday at Delaware Valley Medical Center in Falls Township of an apparent heart attack. Since January, he had owned and operated Mannello's Italian Garden Restaurant on Bustleton Pike in Feasterville. Before that, he owned and operated the Anchor Inn, a historic restaurant in Wrightstown, and the Red Lion Inn in Bensalem. Mr. Mannello was born in the Italian province of Calabria and came to the United States at 15 with his family.
NEWS
October 29, 2012
The drivers in each of two vehicles were killed Sunday in a head-on crash along Route 663, officials said. State Police identified those killed as Nicholas Umberger, 23, who was at the wheel of a Subaru Impreza, and Terry L. Carrozzino, 52, also of Quakertown, the operator of a Ford Explorer. Both were reported wearing seatblets in the accident at 7:04 a.m. in the 1700 block of John Fries Highway (Route 663). Each was pronounced dead at the scene. Investigators said that Umberger's car, traveling south on the highway, crossed into the opposite lane and struck the Explorer.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
  In a state that has the most police departments in the country, Pennsylvania's number will shrink by one next month when two Bucks County boroughs combine forces. New Britain and Doylestown don't share a border, but they sit within a couple miles of each other in central Bucks County. The regionalization will save the boroughs $130,000 the first year, officials said. "Over the years we anticipate the savings to increase to the point where it would have made no economic sense not to regionalize," said New Britain Mayor David Holewinski.
NEWS
March 22, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Anthony Orazi, 78, a retired stonemason, former Bucks County employee, and church leader, died Tuesday at his Morrisville home. He served as deputy recorder of deeds for the county in the 1970s and as supervisor of roads and bridges in the 1980s. Mr. Orazi was born in Bristol Borough and graduated from Bristol High School. During World War II, he served with the Army in Europe and the Pacific and took part in the invasion of Normandy Beach. He moved to Morrisville from Yardley 46 years ago. He had been active in Republican Party politics for many years and served as a committeeman during three decades.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Vacationing families from outside southeastern Pennsylvania typically flock to see the sights within a two-mile radius of Independence Hall in Philadelphia, then perhaps take a jaunt to Bucks County. The Bucks County Tourist Commission is working to reverse their itinerary. "We're now selling the idea of 'Come to Bucks County.' It's a reasonable place to stay and take a side trip into Philadelphia," says the commission's president, Albert Giagnacova. The nonprofit agency over the weekend conducted a complimentary tour for a dozen travel writers from outside Bucks and their families emphasizing "family fun" at several of the county's attractions.
NEWS
November 14, 1988 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like rain running off an open umbrella, the people of the Philadelphia region for decades have moved out toward its edges. Now, regional planners say, the pattern has been reversed. The rural northern edge of Bucks County is being invaded, not from inside the region, but from outside. Homeowners in central New Jersey have been crossing the Delaware River into Bucks, fleeing from towns where corporate office headquarters have been growing - depending on one's prejudice - like wild roses or like weeds in an untended graveyard.
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