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Bucks County

NEWS
July 14, 2002 | By Zlati Meyer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The 1860s white-clapboard farmhouse, set on 10 verdant acres with a pond, swans, fresh air, and the quiet tranquillity of countryside, does more to relax a harried executive than any massage. For Cosmopolitan editor in chief Kate White, her Kintnersville weekend home is an oasis - a break from Manhattan, Manolo Blahniks, air kisses and airbrushing - that she stumbled on 14 years ago while visiting a friend in Frenchtown, N.J. "It was a serendipitous discovery," White said.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Despite a controversy attached to them, Bucks County has already joined other areas in the region and ramped up its use of field drug tests. Police use the mobile test to confirm a drug's authenticity at the beginning of an investigation as they await official lab results. Recently, Bucks County started presenting the mobile results as evidence at preliminary hearings, at which judges decide whether to hold defendants for trial. Although the tests will not replace official lab results at the trial level, they still have drawn concern among defense attorneys over the potential for "false positive" results that have mistakenly landed people in jail.
NEWS
April 2, 1998 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
President Clinton's scandals are keeping more than just Kenneth Starr busy. Take Jeff Munchak of Bucks County. Munchak is the creator of Gummi Bills, chewy 1-inch replicas of the commander-in-chief's head that are becoming more common than subpoenas from the special prosecutor. Munchak, who first marketed the sticky candy last summer, said sales picked up dramatically in January after allegations surfaced that the preident had an affair with a White House intern. "It was pretty tough until this whole Monica Lewinsky story broke," said Munchak.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mention Abbie Hoffman's name in the Apple Jack Bar and Hotel in Point Pleasant and beer pitchers halt at half-pour. Some eyes squint hard, others open warm. Twenty years ago, Hoffman helped divide a nation. But it was only six years ago that his brand of Peck's bad boy radicalism raised hostilities and parted friends along the quiet banks of the Delaware River. Hoffman is dead. What he did in Bucks County is not. "You talking about that idiot ass Abbie Gabby?" asked Rocco, clad in blue jeans and denim jacket, his ponytailed hair tucked underneath a yellow construction hat. "Well, you don't want to talk to me. I'm a Vietnam vet. If Hoffman had heart and honor, I sure didn't see it. I just didn't love the cat. " Dale Stauffer, owner of Apple Jack, glared at Rocco from under his straw hat. "If you're of one viewpoint that's fine, but you gotta listen to the other side," said Stauffer, a big man whose beard and bright eyes make him seem younger than his 53 years.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | By Evan Halper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As television meteorologists tracked Hurricane Floyd with meticulous precision last week, Henry Liese grew just a bit nostalgic. It reminded him of a strange project his company embarked on 40 years ago at a small factory in Newtown. It was only after the work was completed that they realized what they had built: the world's first weather satellite. "Nobody knew what the hell it was," said Liese, 86. "All we heard was that it was going to fly. We said, 'How is this thing going to fly?
LIVING
September 12, 1995 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the sun dips below the trees and day fades into dusk, the Sciarrones pull their car into the parking space and unpack: snacks, card table, lawn chairs, mini-chairs for the children, radio, extra batteries, blankets, cooler, beach balls. They line up the kids in the chairs, divvy up the soda, chips and cookies and wait for the darkening sky to turn midnight blue, a sign from nature that the show is about to begin. Welcome to Friday night at the movies, outdoors-style. "I've been shopping and packing all afternoon," said Kathy Sciarrone, setting a bucket of fried chicken on the card table.
NEWS
June 25, 1999 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When writer Pearl S. Buck marched to the farm next door to her Bucks County home carrying a squirming baby in her arms, David Yoder became a first. Yoder, then 1 year old, was fresh from a Rochester orphanage. He was a biracial child, the son of an unmarried 17-year-old American girl who got pregnant while her family lived in India. In the 1940s, that meant ostracism and shame. No adoption agency could place him. Buck would have none of that. So, as she succinctly put it in an interview before her death, "I founded my own damned agency.
NEWS
August 22, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
HONESDALE, Pa. - As she addressed the defendant in the packed courtroom, Lisa Lesher choked back tears. "Your decision to be the 'cool dad' devastated our community," the Bucks County mother told Michael Ware. "How could a father allow this?" Ware had acknowledged sometimes letting his unlicensed teenage daughter drive. But when he gave the 15-year-old the keys to his SUV last Labor Day weekend, it set in motion a chain of events that ended with the vehicle overturned on a winding Poconos road, three Bucks County boys dead, and an indelible impact on multiple communities.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don Tollefson's sentencing Wednesday proved no less bizarre than his trial, with a psychologist claiming that the former sportscaster told him that his mother forced him to sleep in her bed throughout his childhood and well into college. But the proceeding mostly focused on the fallen icon's future and his potential for redemption. After fleecing 200 people in a sports ticket-selling scheme, Tollefson was sentenced by a Bucks County judge to two to four years in state prison and 15 years' probation for felony money laundering, fraud, and theft.
SPORTS
June 29, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Vesey, a 10-year-old who loves baseball, wants to share the "book" he's written about his dad. Handwritten, it fits on a sheet of lined notebook paper. "On Oct. 13, 2004, I was born," he reads aloud. His mother, Kelly, and three teenage sisters are seated around the granite kitchen counter of their spacious Bucks County home. "It was the best day of my life, and the first," he reads. His sisters giggle. Michael waits, unabashed. "As the years passed, my dad was always there with me," he goes on. "He taught me the sport I love with a tee-ball set. He taught humility and love and passion, all things important in my life.
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