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Buddhist Monks

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NEWS
June 21, 1987 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time, Buddhist monks yesterday joined in the 11-day-old protests, engaging in a short but violent fight with riot police outside the headquarters of the country's largest Buddhist sect. The clash began an afternoon of skirmishes that filled the downtown area for the second time in three days with clouds of tear gas as protesters and police waged battles up and down the main thoroughfares. Smaller numbers of demonstrators came out yesterday than previously during the 11-day-old protests, but the police appeared to respond more violently, often launching tear gas at groups of people without provocation.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | By Marc Kaufman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Chinese government has staged a new crackdown on Tibetan Buddhism, leaving ancient monasteries almost empty and again stifling the religion that is at the heart of Tibet's culture and its desire for independence. Two weeks ago, Chinese troops raided Buddhist sanctuaries around this Himalayan capital and arrested more than 70 monks known for their allegiance to the exiled Dalai Lama, Tibet's traditional spiritual and political leader. Since then, hundreds of monks have fled their monasteries.
NEWS
November 4, 1994 | By Meiyue Zhou, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Burning sandalwood incense in front of the statue of the Bodhisattva - Guan Shi Yin - sprinkling holy water around an altar and chanting scriptures of "Great Compassion," five Buddhist masters in red and yellow gowns gave the invocation yesterday in City Council. "This is the first time in the history of Philadelphia that Buddhist monks and nuns are invited to invocate the City Council, and probably the second time in this country," said Councilman Joseph C. Vignola, who invited them.
NEWS
September 29, 1989 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tibetan monks are not your usual roadies. They are hardly famous for whistle-stopping through small towns or mounting Tantric gigs in places like L.A. and Miami. Yet, since July, 19 monks from the Namgyal Monastery in northern India have been doing just that - hitting the road coast to coast in a three-month, 26-city tour that would do any metal band proud. At 7:30 p.m. Sunday they'll play Philadelphia, presenting their program of ancient ritual dances - Dances From the Diamond Realm - at Irvine Auditorium, 34th and Spruce Streets.
NEWS
April 28, 2011
Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu, 86, who served as South Vietnam's unofficial first lady early on in the Vietnam War and earned the nickname "Dragon Lady" for her criticism of protesting Buddhist monks and communist sympathizers, died Sunday at a Rome hospital. Madame Nhu, whose given name was Tran Le Xuan, lived in the former presidential palace in South Vietnam's capital, Saigon, with her husband, Ngo Dinh Nhu, the powerful head of the secret police, and his bachelor brother, President Ngo Dinh Diem, who served from 1955 to 1963.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
THOUSANDS WORSHIP BUDDHA'S TOOTH IN SRI LANKA Thousands of devotees lined up Monday to worship one of Buddhism's most sacred artifacts - a tooth believed to belong to Lord Buddha. Buddhist monks chanted hymns as worshipers, some from Japan, Thailand and Burma, viewed the tooth in the Sri Lankan city of Kandy. The tooth is believed to have been plucked from Lord Buddha's funeral pyre by a priest in 483 B.C. It is kept by two Buddhist monks who decide when it should be exhibited.
NEWS
April 28, 2011 | Associated Press
ROME - Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu, the outspoken beauty who served as South Vietnam's unofficial first lady early on in the Vietnam War and earned the nickname "Dragon Lady" for her harsh criticism of protesting Buddhist monks and communist sympathizers, has died at age 86, a Rome funeral home said yesterday. She died on Easter in a Rome hospital. The Gualandri funeral home said that she was registered as Tran Le Xuan, her original Vietnamese name, meaning "Beautiful Spring. " Madame Nhu lived in the former presidential palace in South Vietnam's capital, Saigon, with her husband, the powerful head of the secret police, and his bachelor brother, President Ngo Dinh Diem, who served from 1955 to 1963.
NEWS
September 28, 2007 | By Vclav Havel
In the coming days - perhaps even hours - the destiny of Burma (also known as Myanmar), and the fates of more than 50 million Burmese, will be decided. Today's crisis has been brewing for many years. But nobody knew with any precision just when open revolt against Burma's military dictatorship would erupt. I fear that, with only a few exceptions, most countries have been surprised and caught off guard - once again - by the rapid course that events have taken in Burma. So they seem to be completely unprepared for the crisis and thus at a loss as to what to do. How many times and in how many places has this happened?
NEWS
September 24, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Didn't stay well off LIMA, Peru - Former pesident Alberto K. Fujimori, who ruled Peru from 1990 to 2000 with a blend of authoritarianism and showmanship, was being held yesterday on human rights and corruption charges. He was done in by his quest for a second chance at power, which led him to leave comfortable exile in Japan, where his parents were born and where he received asylum in 2000 as his government was collapsing amid corruption scandals. Thousands of Buddhist monks protest in Myanmar BANGKOK, Thailand - The largest street protests in two decades against Myanmar's military rulers gained momentum yesterday as thousands of onlookers cheered barefoot Buddhist monks and shouted support for the detained pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Winding for a sixth day through rainy streets, the protest swelled to 10,000 monks in the main city of Yangon, according to accounts relayed out of the closed country.
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NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Sitting in a Florida jail after being charged with drunken driving, Andrew J. Assini had no one to call and no one to blame. He was 24. "I realized," he recalls, "that maybe I had some part in the never-ending calamity that was my life. I realized, 'Something has to change here.' It was the end of the road. " Since then, nine clean and sober years - and a continuing spiritual quest - have helped Assini replace calamities with accomplishments. The Deptford resident, 33, has earned undergraduate and graduate degrees at Rowan University, where he's an instructor in the psychology department.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral was darkened and the the Crossing choir was positioned in a circle, facing inward, with sound seeming to come from everywhere and nowhere. But even a healthy sense of trepidation had no place at Saturday's opening of the group's annual Month of Moderns festival, in which artistic director Donald Nally unveiled his latest stunning Baltic discovery, Chu dal by Latvian composer Santa Ratniece. Spiritually oriented texts, long disdained under communism, are often a route to blazing originality among Baltic composers; this piece meditates on bodies of water high (Mongolia's Namtso Lake)
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
A WEEK AFTER a beloved fruit-truck vendor was slain outside his South Philadelphia home, Don Ly's death still hung heavy over the quiet block of Vollmer Street where he lived - and violently died. Outside Ly's family's home, about 40 relatives and neighbors gathered last night for a candlelight vigil in memory of the 68-year-old man. In the early hours of April 18, someone viciously attacked Ly, plunging a knife into him seven times and leaving him to die on the street. During the vigil, Ly's son, Hoanh Ly, 38, thanked neighbors and investigators for their support since his father's slaying and begged for anyone who knows anything that may lead to his killer to come forward.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | Associated Press
MEIKHTILA, Myanmar - The nation's president declared a state of emergency Friday in a central city shaken by sectarian bloodshed that has killed at least 20 people, as thousands of minority Muslims fled and overwhelmed riot police crisscrossed the still-burning town seizing machetes and hammers from enraged Buddhist mobs. Black smoke and flames poured from destroyed buildings in Meikhtila, where the unrest between local Buddhist and Muslim residents erupted Wednesday - the latest challenge to Myanmar's ever-precarious transition to democratic rule.
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dun Mark is the kind of person who makes Chinatown a community, not merely a place to live. Cross Spring Street early weekday mornings, cut through the alley to the basketball court tucked behind the Chinese Christian Church, and you'll find Mark teaching tai chi to senior citizens, free of charge. Some of his students are 80 or older. "They're healthy as hell," Mark said. So is he. At 88, Mark is fit, strong, and expecting to be around for a while. His mother lived to 107. On Saturday, he and his graying-but-vibrant students will perform at the 17th annual Mid-Autumn Festival, expected to draw 5,000 to Chinatown from across the Philadelphia region for kung fu exhibitions, Peking opera, health screenings, and a moon cake-eating contest.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | By Thanyarat Doksone, Associated Press
BANGKOK - Buddhist monks led prayers as tens of thousands gathered Saturday in Bangkok to mark the second anniversary of deadly clashes between soldiers and "Red Shirt" protesters. The scene Saturday was a sharp contrast with two years earlier, when Thailand was at war with itself and troops moved in to crush a nine-week antigovernment protest that left more than 90 people dead and 2,000 injured. It was the country's worst political violence in decades. Many speakers addressed the crowd Saturday to demand justice.
TRAVEL
June 12, 2011 | By Phil Grecco, For The Inquirer
On a recent business trip to Thailand, I took advantage of an off day to do some sightseeing. One option listed in the travel brochure in my hotel room that caught my eye was "The Tiger Temple Tour," described as "one of the most extraordinary sights you will ever see. " It turned out to be even better than advertised. As our tour bus arrived at Kanchanaburi, a remote forest region in western Thailand, it was clear that this was neither a temple nor a zoo. The grounds were inhabited by Buddhist monks, who live among such animals as water buffalo, deer, wild boar, peacocks (all roaming about freely)
NEWS
April 28, 2011 | Associated Press
ROME - Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu, the outspoken beauty who served as South Vietnam's unofficial first lady early on in the Vietnam War and earned the nickname "Dragon Lady" for her harsh criticism of protesting Buddhist monks and communist sympathizers, has died at age 86, a Rome funeral home said yesterday. She died on Easter in a Rome hospital. The Gualandri funeral home said that she was registered as Tran Le Xuan, her original Vietnamese name, meaning "Beautiful Spring. " Madame Nhu lived in the former presidential palace in South Vietnam's capital, Saigon, with her husband, the powerful head of the secret police, and his bachelor brother, President Ngo Dinh Diem, who served from 1955 to 1963.
NEWS
April 28, 2011
Madame Ngo Dinh Nhu, 86, who served as South Vietnam's unofficial first lady early on in the Vietnam War and earned the nickname "Dragon Lady" for her criticism of protesting Buddhist monks and communist sympathizers, died Sunday at a Rome hospital. Madame Nhu, whose given name was Tran Le Xuan, lived in the former presidential palace in South Vietnam's capital, Saigon, with her husband, Ngo Dinh Nhu, the powerful head of the secret police, and his bachelor brother, President Ngo Dinh Diem, who served from 1955 to 1963.
NEWS
January 20, 2008 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the Buddhist realm of nonbeing, form and color have no names. But here on the earthly plane at 38th and Chestnut Streets, the particles flowing from Losang Samten's "pen" are forming luminous fields of cobalt, rose, celadon and more, where elephants, skeletons, demons and foolish humans play. It's all an illusion, of course. It's the Wheel of Life. And you are its subject. Samten, a Tibetan-born monk, glanced up Thursday afternoon from the mandala of colored sand he is creating in the sanctuary of the Philadelphia Cathedral, seat of the Episcopal Diocese.
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