CollectionsBudget Bill
IN THE NEWS

Budget Bill

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | By Frederick Cusick and Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
When he was running for re-election in 1982, Gov. Thornburgh scarcely let a week go by that he did not appear in some town or city to stand, smiling, next to a large mockup of a government grant check that the community was to receive. If Altoona was getting $15 million for road work, or if Williamsport was receiving $2 million for an environmental-assessment study, the governor was there, even though his role in the awarding of the grant had been minimal. This year, Democrats who recall the political mileage Thornburgh got out of announcing what were in many cases routine state grants appear to be trying to limit the ability of his would-be successor, Lt. Gov. William W. Scranton 3d, to play the same game.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By Charles Green and R.A. Zaldivar, Inquirer Washington Bureau Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
The Senate early today approved a budget bill that would raise the gasoline tax to 18 cents a gallon as part of a broadly based collection of new taxes and spending reductions. With the Senate action on a vote of 54-46, the five-month-long budget battle moves into its most critical stage, in which the House and Senate must agree on a single bill that resolves their differences over the gasoline tax and tax rates for the wealthy. Lawmakers had been trying to reach a budget accord before 12:01 a.m. tomorrow, when the government's authority to operate expires.
NEWS
March 29, 2006
As most schoolchildren know, the Constitution requires the House and Senate to approve a bill before the president can sign it into law. But that didn't stop President Bush last month from signing a budget bill that, it turns out, was not approved by the House. A congressional clerk inserted a mistake in the House version of the $39 billion measure, changing a provision regarding Medicare reimbursements for medical equipment. Before the bill reached the President's desk, Republican leaders warned the White House that the Senate and House bills were not identical.
NEWS
June 9, 1986 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
With the fiscal-year deadline little more than three weeks away, the state House of Representatives is scheduled to begin debate this week on a record state spending plan of $9.71 billion. The budget bill was proposed by House Democratic leaders, and the annual House debate is expected to generate hundreds of proposed amendments, with attention focused on such key issues as the distribution of $2.2 billion in local school aid and establishment of a new statewide minimum salary for public school teachers.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By David Lightman, Margaret Talev, and William Douglas, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Congress voted Thursday to keep the federal government running through the end of September - but not before a struggle that saw both conservative and liberal opposition to the compromise spending plan painstakingly crafted by the White House and congressional negotiators. The vote in the GOP-led House was 260-167, with 59 Republicans breaking ranks with their party leadership to vote against the deal, which calls for $38 billion in spending cuts this year. The Republican defections, a result of opposition from conservatives who said the bill did not do enough to rein in spending, forced Speaker John A. Boehner to turn to Democrats to help pass the bill.
NEWS
July 4, 2004 | By Amy Worden and John Sullivan INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Pennsylvania's $22.7 billion state budget - which by law should have been approved on June 30 - remained caught in a bottleneck early this morning after the state House worked late to pass a gambling bill, 113-88. Legislative leaders said the budget bill would not be taken up until the slots bill and the property tax reform bill had cleared both chambers. Late yesterday afternoon, gambling opponents offered an amendment to prohibit lawmakers from holding any interest in gambling companies, and a contentious 1 1/2-hour debate ensued.
NEWS
November 18, 1995 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article includes information from Inquirer wire services
Congress yesterday approved the huge Republican budget bill that would scale back programs for the elderly and poor, cut taxes for middle-class families and investors, and put the government on track to a balanced budget. With GOP lawmakers cheering the vote, the House ratified the seven-year balanced budget, 237-189, almost exclusively along party lines. A few hours later, the Senate concurred, 52-47, but with a minor change that requires another vote in the House today. After that, it would go to the White House, where President Clinton is almost certain to veto it. As the Senate debated the bill last night, White House chief of staff Leon Panetta negotiated with congressional leaders.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
They told Gov. Ridge: Don't mess with our pet issues. They also voted to spend more on education than Ridge wanted, even dipping into their own internal reserves to pay for new textbooks for public school students. When House members passed a $17.06 billion fiscal 1997-98 budget last week, they delivered a message about their priorities, but crossed their fingers as they sent it to the Senate. Not all members were optimistic about its fate. "That budget coming back from the Senate won't look the same at all," said Rep. Mario J. Civera Jr. (R., Delaware)
NEWS
November 11, 2005 | By James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a stunning breakdown of Republican unity, House leaders failed yesterday to muster enough votes to pass $50 billion in budget savings, their ranks torn between moderate and conservative wings that rejected pleas for party discipline. The GOP leaders, who also faced unified Democratic opposition, were forced to pull the budget bill off the House floor rather than see it defeated. At the same time, rebellion by Sen. Olympia J. Snowe, a moderate Republican from Maine, blocked the Senate Finance Committee from approving a $70 billion tax-cut package, another Republican priority.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The House cleared another hurdle yesterday on its way toward passing a state budget by approving a resolution restricting the way the spending plan can be amended when it is voted on next week. Under the new rule, if legislators want to propose more money for schools, buses or health care, for instance, they will first have to find items to cut from the $16.2 billion budget that Gov. Ridge wants. Even with the rule, House leaders expect a tide of amendments to the budget. No matter what emerges from the House, many lawmakers say legislative leaders ultimately will end up drafting the final budget.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - In yet another turn of the political carousel that is the still-unapproved state budget, Gov. Wolf said Wednesday that he would veto the latest spending plan passed by the Republican-controlled legislature. "Republican leaders are once again insistent on passing another irresponsible and unbalanced budget that does not fund our schools or fix the deficit," the Democratic governor said in a statement. "This is further indication that the Republican leaders have no intention of working together with me to produce a final budget.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
By Mark Krikorian Sanctuary cities are a menace to public safety. A recent move in the House of Representatives to cut their funding is long overdue. There are more than 300 sanctuary jurisdictions nationwide, including cities like New York, counties like Chicago's Cook County, and even whole states like California. These jurisdictions refuse to cooperate with immigration authorities and release deportable criminals back onto the streets. In 2014, more than 9,000 criminals who entered the country illegally and whom the Department of Homeland Security wanted to deport were released instead because of local sanctuary policies, according to the department's records.
NEWS
December 31, 2015
TO BEGIN WITH, the budget the Republican Legislature passed last week and left on the governor's desk was as phony as a three-dollar bill. The $30.3 billion budget pretended to be balanced, but it was not. It exceeded available revenue by $300 million. It pretended to fund all vital state services, but it did not. The Legislature sort of forgot to include $550 million in state support for Temple, Pitt and Penn State. The budget pretended to increase state funding for education, but it did not. It added more money to the basic education subsidy, while taking away a $304 million item to help school district's pay construction and repair bills.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - In a dramatic twist, the Pennsylvania House reversed course Tuesday and positioned itself to vote on the $30.8 billion state spending plan backed by Gov. Wolf and Senate Republicans, setting up a possible sprint to end the months-long budget impasse by Christmas. The shift came a day after the Republican-controlled House proposed a temporary budget and Wolf vowed to veto that plan if it reached his desk. During a chaotic floor session Tuesday, House members suddenly abandoned their so-called stopgap proposal by a 100-99 vote, moving instead to consider the budget that the Senate has already passed.
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania Senate on Thursday passed nearly all the final pieces of a long-overdue budget plan, including a bill that would let consumers for the first time purchase wine in some supermarkets and restaurants, and legislation to distribute $350 million in new school funding. The liquor bill calls for enabling licensed supermarkets, restaurants, and bars to sell as many as four bottles of wine to customers. The education measure would spread more money to schools this year using a blend of approaches favored both by Gov. Wolf and the Republican-led Senate.
NEWS
December 9, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania House and Senate took radically different steps Monday toward resolving the state's five-month-old budget impasse, placing the chambers on seemingly separate tracks just days after they had been working together on a final agreement. During a brief and nearly debate-free session, the Senate overwhelmingly passed a $30.8 billion spending plan that reflects many aspects of the so-called framework agreement announced by Gov. Wolf and Republican leaders before Thanksgiving.
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | BY MADELEINE DEAN
AT THE CLOSE of every session, my colleagues and I hear a familiar patter, signaling the end of a legislative day, and we exit to the refrain that is now ringing in my mind: "The House will stand in recess until [some future date], unless sooner recalled by the speaker. " As Republican House leadership hollowly tries to blame Gov. Wolf for Pennsylvania's current budget failure, perhaps they should be pointing fingers closer to home. While it is true that Gov. Wolf vetoed the Republicans' budget bill - an anemic, retread of a budget that would have worsened the commonwealth's fiscal situation - there is one person who has the power to get House lawmakers back to work and craft a better budget for Pennsylvania: the speaker of the House.
NEWS
July 3, 2015
AS EXPECTED, Gov. Wolf this week vetoed the $30.2 billion budget passed by legislative Republicans, saying that it was filled with "gimmicks . . . smoke and mirrors and a lot of kick the can down the road. " That is a long string of clich├ęs, but the governor was right. The Republican budget balanced on paper, but did so by shortchanging public education and pillaging various state funds that were supposed to be dedicated to such things as school construction and child-welfare payments.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Angela Couloumbis, and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania budget deadline has come and gone, with critical pieces of legislation still in limbo - including the fiscal blueprint itself and the much-anticipated Philadelphia cigarette tax - and tension rising again in the Capitol. A week after its passage by the legislature, Gov. Corbett has yet to sign the $29.1 billion general appropriations bill for 2014-15. Nor has the General Assembly finalized a key budget-related bill - the fiscal code - that directs spending for schools and hundreds of other items.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A House panel on Tuesday advanced a $29.1 billion budget, setting the stage for final negotiations with the Senate and Gov. Corbett on the 2014-15 spending plan. The Appropriations Committee voted, 21-14, along party lines to move the proposal to the House floor, but it is likely to undergo significant changes before reaching Corbett's desk. The bill proposes to close a $1.5 billion budget gap by transferring funds from other sources, including the sale of state liquor stores - a plan that hasn't materialized.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|