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Budget Bill

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NEWS
July 3, 1986 | By Frederick Cusick and Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
When he was running for re-election in 1982, Gov. Thornburgh scarcely let a week go by that he did not appear in some town or city to stand, smiling, next to a large mockup of a government grant check that the community was to receive. If Altoona was getting $15 million for road work, or if Williamsport was receiving $2 million for an environmental-assessment study, the governor was there, even though his role in the awarding of the grant had been minimal. This year, Democrats who recall the political mileage Thornburgh got out of announcing what were in many cases routine state grants appear to be trying to limit the ability of his would-be successor, Lt. Gov. William W. Scranton 3d, to play the same game.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By Charles Green and R.A. Zaldivar, Inquirer Washington Bureau Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
The Senate early today approved a budget bill that would raise the gasoline tax to 18 cents a gallon as part of a broadly based collection of new taxes and spending reductions. With the Senate action on a vote of 54-46, the five-month-long budget battle moves into its most critical stage, in which the House and Senate must agree on a single bill that resolves their differences over the gasoline tax and tax rates for the wealthy. Lawmakers had been trying to reach a budget accord before 12:01 a.m. tomorrow, when the government's authority to operate expires.
NEWS
March 29, 2006
As most schoolchildren know, the Constitution requires the House and Senate to approve a bill before the president can sign it into law. But that didn't stop President Bush last month from signing a budget bill that, it turns out, was not approved by the House. A congressional clerk inserted a mistake in the House version of the $39 billion measure, changing a provision regarding Medicare reimbursements for medical equipment. Before the bill reached the President's desk, Republican leaders warned the White House that the Senate and House bills were not identical.
NEWS
June 9, 1986 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
With the fiscal-year deadline little more than three weeks away, the state House of Representatives is scheduled to begin debate this week on a record state spending plan of $9.71 billion. The budget bill was proposed by House Democratic leaders, and the annual House debate is expected to generate hundreds of proposed amendments, with attention focused on such key issues as the distribution of $2.2 billion in local school aid and establishment of a new statewide minimum salary for public school teachers.
NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By David Lightman, Margaret Talev, and William Douglas, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - Congress voted Thursday to keep the federal government running through the end of September - but not before a struggle that saw both conservative and liberal opposition to the compromise spending plan painstakingly crafted by the White House and congressional negotiators. The vote in the GOP-led House was 260-167, with 59 Republicans breaking ranks with their party leadership to vote against the deal, which calls for $38 billion in spending cuts this year. The Republican defections, a result of opposition from conservatives who said the bill did not do enough to rein in spending, forced Speaker John A. Boehner to turn to Democrats to help pass the bill.
NEWS
July 4, 2004 | By Amy Worden and John Sullivan INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Pennsylvania's $22.7 billion state budget - which by law should have been approved on June 30 - remained caught in a bottleneck early this morning after the state House worked late to pass a gambling bill, 113-88. Legislative leaders said the budget bill would not be taken up until the slots bill and the property tax reform bill had cleared both chambers. Late yesterday afternoon, gambling opponents offered an amendment to prohibit lawmakers from holding any interest in gambling companies, and a contentious 1 1/2-hour debate ensued.
NEWS
November 18, 1995 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article includes information from Inquirer wire services
Congress yesterday approved the huge Republican budget bill that would scale back programs for the elderly and poor, cut taxes for middle-class families and investors, and put the government on track to a balanced budget. With GOP lawmakers cheering the vote, the House ratified the seven-year balanced budget, 237-189, almost exclusively along party lines. A few hours later, the Senate concurred, 52-47, but with a minor change that requires another vote in the House today. After that, it would go to the White House, where President Clinton is almost certain to veto it. As the Senate debated the bill last night, White House chief of staff Leon Panetta negotiated with congressional leaders.
NEWS
April 6, 1997 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
They told Gov. Ridge: Don't mess with our pet issues. They also voted to spend more on education than Ridge wanted, even dipping into their own internal reserves to pay for new textbooks for public school students. When House members passed a $17.06 billion fiscal 1997-98 budget last week, they delivered a message about their priorities, but crossed their fingers as they sent it to the Senate. Not all members were optimistic about its fate. "That budget coming back from the Senate won't look the same at all," said Rep. Mario J. Civera Jr. (R., Delaware)
NEWS
November 11, 2005 | By James Kuhnhenn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a stunning breakdown of Republican unity, House leaders failed yesterday to muster enough votes to pass $50 billion in budget savings, their ranks torn between moderate and conservative wings that rejected pleas for party discipline. The GOP leaders, who also faced unified Democratic opposition, were forced to pull the budget bill off the House floor rather than see it defeated. At the same time, rebellion by Sen. Olympia J. Snowe, a moderate Republican from Maine, blocked the Senate Finance Committee from approving a $70 billion tax-cut package, another Republican priority.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The House cleared another hurdle yesterday on its way toward passing a state budget by approving a resolution restricting the way the spending plan can be amended when it is voted on next week. Under the new rule, if legislators want to propose more money for schools, buses or health care, for instance, they will first have to find items to cut from the $16.2 billion budget that Gov. Ridge wants. Even with the rule, House leaders expect a tide of amendments to the budget. No matter what emerges from the House, many lawmakers say legislative leaders ultimately will end up drafting the final budget.
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NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Angela Couloumbis, and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania budget deadline has come and gone, with critical pieces of legislation still in limbo - including the fiscal blueprint itself and the much-anticipated Philadelphia cigarette tax - and tension rising again in the Capitol. A week after its passage by the legislature, Gov. Corbett has yet to sign the $29.1 billion general appropriations bill for 2014-15. Nor has the General Assembly finalized a key budget-related bill - the fiscal code - that directs spending for schools and hundreds of other items.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A House panel on Tuesday advanced a $29.1 billion budget, setting the stage for final negotiations with the Senate and Gov. Corbett on the 2014-15 spending plan. The Appropriations Committee voted, 21-14, along party lines to move the proposal to the House floor, but it is likely to undergo significant changes before reaching Corbett's desk. The bill proposes to close a $1.5 billion budget gap by transferring funds from other sources, including the sale of state liquor stores - a plan that hasn't materialized.
NEWS
June 30, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A Senate panel late Friday approved a bill that would authorize Medicaid expansion in the state as part of the annual budget. By a vote of 9-2, the Senate Health and Welfare Committee voted out an amendment to the welfare code that would clear the way for as many as 600,000 uninsured Pennsylvanians to be covered under the Affordable Care Act, also known as "Obamacare. " The vote may signal a shift on the issue. Gov. Corbett has been reluctant to accept Medicaid expansion, warning of expenses for the state in future years as the federal share of the cost decreases.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - With only muted dissent, the New Jersey Legislature gave final approval to a $32.9 billion budget Monday that is slightly larger than last year's, contains no new taxes or layoffs, and tracks closely with the fiscal plan laid out by Gov. Christie in February. The Senate passed the budget bill by a 29-11 vote and was followed a short time later by the Assembly, which passed the measure, 52-25. The bill, for the budget year that begins Monday, was the result of talks between Democratic Assembly and Senate leaders and the governor's office.
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell and Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Gov. Christie signed a $31.7 billion budget bill Friday for the coming fiscal year, but not before he cut $361 million in Democratic-backed initiatives, including measures that would have provided more money for legal services to the poor, aid for low-income students aiming for college, and a tax credit for low-wage earners. The Republican governor instead diverted those funds to the state's surplus, doubling it to $648 million. He wants Democrats to cut taxes and said he would fight them on the issue all summer.
NEWS
June 30, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell and Matt Katz, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie signed a $31.7 billion budget bill Friday for the coming fiscal year, but not before he cut $361 million in Democratic-backed initiatives, including measures that would have provided more money for legal services to the poor, aid for low-income students aiming for college, and a tax credit for low-wage earners. The Republican governor instead diverted those funds to the state's surplus, doubling it to $648 million. He wants Democrats to cut taxes and said he would fight them on the issue all summer.
NEWS
June 27, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Democratic lawmakers sent a budget to Gov. Christie on Monday night that tests whether he will let the government shut down over a tax-cut dispute. The Democrats' tax-relief plan is starkly different from Christie's proposal, setting up a possible showdown in the five days before the new fiscal year begins Sunday. The Republican governor can veto the budget bill outright, forcing a last-ditch attempt for compromise before Sunday, when the government would be unable to pay its bills.
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - A $32 billion state budget that contains money for tax relief, but with a provision to hold the funds for at least six months, cleared its final committee hurdle Friday. Republican Gov. Christie threatened to make things uncomfortable for the Legislature's majority Democrats unless they make the tax cut immediate. The bill, approved by the budget panel, heads to the Assembly and Senate for showdowns next week, then to the governor for his signature. A balanced budget must be in place by July 1, the start of the new fiscal year.
NEWS
June 22, 2012
City Council could be set for another long day Thursday as members attempt to pass a package of budget bills that have wide-ranging implications for taxpayers and the School District. Thursday's meeting is the last on the schedule before the summer recess, but Council President Darrell L. Clarke said there was a "strong possibility" that a meeting would be added next week. Among the bills up for a final vote Thursday are proposals to raise $20 million in property taxes and $20 million in the Use and Occupancy tax on businesses.
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