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Budget Process

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NEWS
February 26, 1993 | BY LANCE HAVER
It's a sacrifice if you give something up. It's robbery if someone takes it from you. The city budget proposed by Mayor Rendell is 42 pages long. And while it recommends that the city collect and spend $2.379 billion, nowhere does it say what the taxpayers will buy for their money. For example, Page 15 authorizes the city to spend over $23 million for a "Convention Center subsidy," and over $5 million for the Philadelphia Civic Center. It doesn't say what the "subsidy" is for or how long the taxpayers are going to pay it. City Council has to hold hearings on the budget before anyone can understand what the mayor is really proposing.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
Gina Kozek is looking forward to next September when her youngest child will enter kindergarten and be at the same school as her first grader. When she heard a rumor that the Medford Township schools were facing a budget crunch that might change that scenario, she became concerned. So despite the cold, rainy weather last Thursday, Kozek, who has lived in Medford for nine years, went to the Allen School to the second of five town meetings sponsored by the school board. The purpose of the meetings is to include the public in the school budget process, said Assistant Superintendent Robert Elder, who hosted the meeting along with Assistant Superintendent Susan Mintz.
NEWS
October 5, 2015
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET Stymied by the GOP The Republican stopgap budget is yet another gimmick that shortchanges the people of Pennsylvania. Republicans in Harrisburg have become too comfortable with politics as usual, and the stopgap they passed embraces a failed status quo that is preventing Pennsylvania from moving forward. The Republican legislature has passed fiscally irresponsible budgets for four years. We are facing a multibillion-dollar deficit and are trying to recover from numerous credit downgrades.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
On Tuesday night, Warminster Township manager Andrew A. Mair took the first step in the 1991 budget process when he presented his bosses with a preliminary work sheet for the budget. And, just as the saying goes, the first step appears to be the hardest. Mair had just finished explaining to the Board of Supervisors that the numbers were estimates and not the "real budget numbers," when Supervisor Raymond Regan went on the offensive. "It's not worth the paper it's printed on. It's as worthless as the 1990 budget," said Regan, the board's lone Democrat and a staunch critic of his Republicans counterparts and Mair.
NEWS
July 30, 1987 | By Howard Gensler, Special to The Inquirer
Curt Weldon, freshman Republican representative, offered an insider's view of the federal budget process to about 50 area residents last weekend at an informal town meeting in Haverford. Advocating common sense in the budget process and an attitude summed up by "you can only spend what you take in," Weldon explained why he refused to support any of the four budget proposals, including the one that passed the House. Weldon called the President's budget "unrealistic," and he objected to the Gold Standard aspects of the right-wing budget and the defense cuts of the black caucus budget.
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | By Diane M. Fiske, Special to The Inquirer
Bridgeport's second council meeting of the new year, on Tuesday night, ended with an hourlong presentation of the history of borough budget problems by Dan Eberhardt, co-chairman of a citizens group that has opposed the council's attempt to permit a trash-baling station to help alleviate local monetary woes. Eberhardt, at the last minute, won the right to appear at what had been planned as a largely ceremonial meeting. Borough solicitor Pierce Anderson said Eberhardt's request, made at a work session Monday night, was in line with a new ordinance confining the right to speak during the public session of council meetings to those who submitted a written request 24 hours in advance.
NEWS
March 3, 2009
IF THE RECENTLY ENDED citizen budget workshops showed us anything, it was that ordinary city taxpayers care very much about where their money goes and will come out -by the thousands -to debate the best way to spend it. Maybe if more than a few Council members had bothered to show up at those meetings, they'd have a better clue about how they should conduct their own budget hearings. So far, it seems they have no clue. Last week, Council President Anna Verna barred reporters from a meeting where Council was discussing the idea of holding some budget hearings in places other than City Hall.
NEWS
May 30, 2008 | By State Rep. Mario J. Civera Jr
My colleagues and I know and respect that Pennsylvanians want to be represented in an atmosphere that is free of secrecy and back-room deals. While many lawmakers have continued to fight hard for openness and transparency in Harrisburg, there are still some trying to shut the door on this year's state budget process - the one place where openness and transparency should be most welcomed. For more than two months, the state budget bill has remained dormant in the Democrat-controlled House Appropriations Committee.
NEWS
April 7, 2011 | By BEN WAXMAN
THE PHILLIES' season might be just starting, but City Council is quickly approaching the all-star break: The budget process has almost reached its halfway point, with a little over a month left before Council is likely to vote on Mayor Nutter's spending plan. After three years, city tax revenues have finally stabilized. But looming cuts at the state level make the city's fiscal future far from certain. The decisions made during the budget process affect everyone who works and lives in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 28, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Concerned about the Philadelphia School District's financial problems, City Controller Alan Butkovitz said yesterday he would seek legislation to give his office greater authority to audit school finances. He also plans to call for legislation that would give the Pennsylvania Intergovernmental Cooperation Authority (PICA) or some other state agency the ability to oversee district finances, approving both its annual operating budget and a five-year financial plan. The agency currently monitors city finances.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The House gave preliminary approval Wednesday to a proposal to legalize online wagering and permit slot machines in airports and off-track betting sites, a plan supporters say could generate $250 million a year in revenue. The bill, which also would regulate and tax fantasy sports contests, still needs final approval by the House and in the Senate, where its fate is not assured. Proponents hailed it as a key step as the state inches toward a new fiscal year without a budget deal yet in place.
NEWS
February 17, 2016
By Jim Cawley, Maari Porter, and Pedro A. Ramos Amid last week's wintry blast, Gov. Wolf unveiled his 2016-17 budget proposal, a frigid reminder of the extraordinary circumstances in which we find ourselves as a commonwealth. With a new fiscal year just around the corner, Pennsylvania remains burdened by the inadequate 2015-16 budget signed on Dec. 29 by the governor, in which he vetoed $7 billion in spending after prolonged wrangling with the Republican-led legislature. Current funding levels are woefully insufficient for a properly functioning commonwealth and, barring further action in Harrisburg, could in fact threaten the education of our children and the well-being of many of our most at-risk populations.
NEWS
February 11, 2016
NOT TO UNDULY alarm anyone, but it appears that Pennsylvania never will have a budget again, at least not one from Democratic Gov. Wolf and the current Republican legislature. Wolf on Tuesday growled at lawmakers, gave them what-for, saying, "Get back to work. " Then, close to employing the royal we , said that if they sent him another budget like the ones they like, "I will not be amused. " Not so sure the tactic worked. Afterward, Senate GOP Leader Jake Corman said, "We're further apart than we ever were.
NEWS
October 10, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Kenney, the Democratic nominee for mayor, on Thursday repeated his push for "universal pre-K" for all 4-year-olds in Philadelphia by the end of his first term if he wins the Nov. 3 general election. Kenney, however, would not detail how he would fund that $60 million plan. While touring a pre-K classroom in the Spring Garden neighborhood with Gov. Wolf and City Council President Darrell L. Clarke, Kenney said the details would come in next year's budget process. "At this specific point in time, you're not going to get any specifics from me," Kenney said, "because we want to be sure we have every 'T' crossed and every 'I' dotted before we trot out a plan.
NEWS
October 5, 2015
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET Stymied by the GOP The Republican stopgap budget is yet another gimmick that shortchanges the people of Pennsylvania. Republicans in Harrisburg have become too comfortable with politics as usual, and the stopgap they passed embraces a failed status quo that is preventing Pennsylvania from moving forward. The Republican legislature has passed fiscally irresponsible budgets for four years. We are facing a multibillion-dollar deficit and are trying to recover from numerous credit downgrades.
NEWS
September 9, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
All the talk about not starting another school year amid financial uncertainty was apparently just that: talk. School doors will open on time today, but with the legislature and Gov. Wolf still dueling over the state budget, the fiscal cloud hanging over Philadelphia and other districts hasn't dissipated. City Council President Darrell Clarke's recent comments didn't help, throwing cold water on what was supposed to be a unified effort to convince legislators from other parts of Pennsylvania that the Philadelphia schools no longer deserve the spendthrift reputation that has served as a convenient cudgel to beat back requests for more education dollars.
NEWS
June 30, 2015
TODAY WE LOOK at Harrisburg's budget process. We do so because many wonder why the process causes such grief. It's simple really. Grief is what politics is about: politicians give each other grief; politicians cause taxpayers grief. It's just the way of the world. So, at a colleague's suggestion, here's how the budget is working through the well-known five stages of grief. Stage one? Denial: The new governor, the "different kind of governor," Democrat Tom Wolf, on March 3 proposes bold plans to make Pennsylvania better.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey Democrats on Monday unveiled the broad contours of the budget they will submit to Gov. Christie, saying they would make a full contribution to the underfunded pension system by raising taxes on businesses and the state's highest earners. Christie, a Republican who says he will announce whether he is running for president by the end of the month, has vowed not to raise taxes. The state constitution requires the Legislature to pass, and the governor to sign, a balanced budget by next Tuesday.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey lawmakers scrutinized Gov. Christie's proposed $33.8 billion budget Wednesday, hearing testimony in South Jersey on how the spending plan could affect hospitals, higher education, historic preservation, and services. Even as lawmakers welcomed comments on the merits of funding for those issues, they impressed upon the public the tight constraints of the budget. The Assembly Budget Committee convened at Collingswood's Scottish Rite Auditorium. The Senate Budget Committee is scheduled to meet March 25 at Rowan College of Gloucester County in Sewell.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Included in the $12.7 billion that Gov. Christie is proposing to spend on pre-K to grade-12 education is a measure bound to raise hopes as well as eyebrows - a pilot program that would pay for students in failing schools to attend private, religious, or out-of-district public schools. Christie's proposed fiscal 2016 budget calls for $2 million to fund a demonstration model based on the never-passed Opportunity Scholarship Act. Long a supporter of vouchers and other school-choice measures, Christie put a pilot program in his proposed budget two years ago, but it was removed by the Legislature's Democratic majority.
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