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BUSINESS
June 2, 2000 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Whassup? "I'm not happy, Frank," says cranky Louie the Lizard in a new TV spot for Budweiser. "They stole my tongue thing. " Can you believe it? Now that wretched reptile is picking on our guys. In a series of ads to air on NBC during the upcoming National Basketball Association finals, Louie actually claims that the four friends from Philadelphia featured in the popular "Whassup" commercials stole their routine from him. In one of the new spots, Louie appears on one side of a split screen with his tongue out. On the other side is Charles Stone III saying "whazzzzahhh" into a telephone with his tongue out. An on-screen question asks: "Coincidence?"
NEWS
May 21, 2016
Because advertising is a barometer that often accurately measures America's psychological atmosphere, attention must be paid to this: From Monday through the presidential election, Budweiser beer will bear a different name. Eager to do its bit to make America great again, the brewer will replace the name Budweiser with America on its 12-ounce bottles and cans. The Financial Times says this is "a bid to capitalize on U.S. election fever. " (Before the Chicago Cubs bestrode the world like a colossus, T-shirts proclaimed "Cubs Fever: Catch it - and die. ")
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | Los Angeles Daily News
A 42-year-old man was arrested after authorities said he used a gun to commandeer a Budweiser beer truck and drive it home, later telling police: "I was just getting some beer. " David Vaiz of Mission Hills, was arrested yesterday outside his home when an officer saw him with two beer cases in hand and the beer truck parked nearby.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rural Lancaster County used to be solid Budweiser country, where the "King of Beers" was the brew of choice for working men and women who patronize the roadside bars around New Holland and Ephrata. But as summer becomes fall this year, die-hard Bud drinkers are turning to Rolling Rock and Coors. Barkeeps are refusing to stock Budweiser, and are selling baseball caps and T-shirts urging their customers to join the "great Bud boycott" of 1989. "This is a matter of principle and of business," said Ken Bondarchuk, owner of the Blue Ball Hotel, one of 25 taverns where beer is now steeped in political overtones as Budweiser has become Goliath, with the bar owners cast as David.
NEWS
September 25, 1995 | BY MIKE ROYKO
It's not news that sex is a major theme of modern advertising. It's used in everything from peddling jeans, as in the kiddie porn of Calvin Klein, to gorgeous women flashing long limbs as they get out of sleek cars. But recently, the Budweiser beer people came up with one of the most peculiar sexually suggestive ads I've ever seen. As most TV viewers know, the current Budweiser ads feature frogs. In one commercial, three frogs make croaking sounds. And eventually, the three sounds come together to form "Budweiser.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
BY NOW it's obvious that the highly publicized, $5 million class-action lawsuit charging Budweiser with overstating its alcohol content is pure B.S. The plaintiffs, including two Montgomery County brothers, say that Anheuser-Busch deliberately waters down its beer, and that its alcohol content is "significantly" overstated on its labels. But the lawsuit provides no evidence to back up that claim. It cites no scientific-based data, or even how much Bud drinkers are being shortchanged.
NEWS
June 9, 2004 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since March, partisans of President Bush and Sen. John Kerry have poured about $151 million into TV ads that have aired approximately 140,000 times. Madison Avenue has deemed the commercials dull. Where's the buzz? What's the word at the watercooler? Try traveshamockery - a fake word sputtered by a mock candidate during a faux presidential debate in an ad for beer. "This whole thing is a travesty and a sham and a mockery! It's a traveshamockery!" yells comedian Bob Odenkirk, of the '90s HBO cult hit The Show.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1990 | By Barbara Beck and Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writers
If the Super Bowl were a cartoon, the San Francisco 49ers would be riding a giant steam roller, methodically and mercilessly flattening the non-charging Denver Broncos. And the extravagantly expensive commercials would feature Pee-wee's Kinder, Gentler Nation, where everyone is happy, hugging, singing, laughing, dancing and shaving. For the paradox of Super Bowl XXIV (Sunday on Channel 10 at 5 p.m.) is that American business will be using nurturing men, liberated women and the hopes for world peace to sell products to millions of viewers who embrace the concept that violence can be fun. Never mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By ROGER MOORE, The Orlando Sentinel
JENNA FISCHER talks directly to the camera in early scenes in "A Little Help. " She lets us see the life that's overwhelming her, the bitterness that threatens to swallow her whole and the irritation she's trying her darnedest to hide. As Laura, a woman unhappy with work - she's a dental hygienist - unhappily married (Chris O'Donnell plays the husband always "in a meeting") and failing at keeping the upper hand with her rude 12-year-old son (Daniel Yelsky), Fischer has the perfect big-screen role to fit her TV-perfected ("The Office")
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
NICHOLAS Sparks, known for his weepy, florid stories of romance, is also preoccupied with class. His heroes are invariably young men from the wrong side of the tracks, muscular strivers who attract the attention of well-to-do young women. The most recent version in Sparks' "The Best of Me" is Dawson, a smart kid from a family of moonshiners, a clan run by an abusive redneck who looks like he's on leave from one of those old Joe Don Baker "Walking Tall" movies. Dawson (Luke Bracey, a name Sparks might have come up with)
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NEWS
May 21, 2016
Because advertising is a barometer that often accurately measures America's psychological atmosphere, attention must be paid to this: From Monday through the presidential election, Budweiser beer will bear a different name. Eager to do its bit to make America great again, the brewer will replace the name Budweiser with America on its 12-ounce bottles and cans. The Financial Times says this is "a bid to capitalize on U.S. election fever. " (Before the Chicago Cubs bestrode the world like a colossus, T-shirts proclaimed "Cubs Fever: Catch it - and die. ")
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
NICHOLAS Sparks, known for his weepy, florid stories of romance, is also preoccupied with class. His heroes are invariably young men from the wrong side of the tracks, muscular strivers who attract the attention of well-to-do young women. The most recent version in Sparks' "The Best of Me" is Dawson, a smart kid from a family of moonshiners, a clan run by an abusive redneck who looks like he's on leave from one of those old Joe Don Baker "Walking Tall" movies. Dawson (Luke Bracey, a name Sparks might have come up with)
NEWS
March 8, 2013
BY NOW it's obvious that the highly publicized, $5 million class-action lawsuit charging Budweiser with overstating its alcohol content is pure B.S. The plaintiffs, including two Montgomery County brothers, say that Anheuser-Busch deliberately waters down its beer, and that its alcohol content is "significantly" overstated on its labels. But the lawsuit provides no evidence to back up that claim. It cites no scientific-based data, or even how much Bud drinkers are being shortchanged.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2013 | By Pete Yost, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department filed a lawsuit Thursday to stop Anheuser-Busch InBev's proposed $20.1 billion purchase of the Mexican brewer Grupo Modelo, which would unite the ownership of popular beers like Budweiser and Corona. The government said the deal could lead to higher beer prices in this country because it would substantially reduce competition in the U.S. beer market, particularly in 26 metropolitan areas. It said the merged firm would control nearly half the beer sales in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By ROGER MOORE, The Orlando Sentinel
JENNA FISCHER talks directly to the camera in early scenes in "A Little Help. " She lets us see the life that's overwhelming her, the bitterness that threatens to swallow her whole and the irritation she's trying her darnedest to hide. As Laura, a woman unhappy with work - she's a dental hygienist - unhappily married (Chris O'Donnell plays the husband always "in a meeting") and failing at keeping the upper hand with her rude 12-year-old son (Daniel Yelsky), Fischer has the perfect big-screen role to fit her TV-perfected ("The Office")
BUSINESS
July 16, 2011 | By Drew Singer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphians are buying more craft beer than ever, but the region's brewmasters are bracing for the biggest name in beer to move into town. Anheuser-Busch InBev, maker of Budweiser products and the world's largest brewer, trademarked the name "215" this spring, along with the area codes for 14 other U.S. cities. The filing is the first public step toward creating a new beer by the same name. "We're being attacked," said Bill Covaleski, brewmaster and president of Victory Brewing Co., a craft brewery in Downingtown.
SPORTS
February 8, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
Kevin Harvick started Speedweeks in bed with the flu, started the Budweiser Shootout in a backup car and started the final few laps out of the lead. After all that, he ended up in Victory Lane - again. Harvick won the exhibition race at Daytona International Speedway for the second consecutive year by moving from fourth to first and passing leader Greg Biffle with two laps remaining in Saturday night's kickoff race to Speedweeks. Biffle's wreck moments later ended the race under caution, giving Harvick his first win since the Shootout victory a year ago. He hasn't won a points race since the 2007 season-opening Daytona 500, and was not ready to proclaim his win a precursor for a repeat in next week's 500. "I know we started last year the same way," he said of the 2009 Shootout win - the lone bright spot in an otherwise dismal season for Harvick.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2008
IT'S JUST a coincidence, but there was a striking convergence of ale developments in the city this week. The new Budweiser American Ale hit the streets, and Yards - the city's British-style ale maker - finally began brewing at its new facility in Northern Liberties. Ale, for those who need the remedial, is one of the two main types of beer, distinguished from more commonplace lager by its yeast strain and temperature of fermentation. Ale is fermented at warm temps, which produces a fruitier, fuller flavor than that of the typical crisp, cold-brewed lager.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2004 | By LAURA RANDALL -- For the Daily News
There's a scene in the new film "Mr. 3000" in which Bernie Mac, as pro baseball player Stan Ross, recalls the music of the Mr. Softee truck that was always parked near the field where he played ball as a kid. Other players chime in with their own memories of the tune. Director Charles Stone III based the scene on his own childhood memories of pitching and playing right field for the Wolf Baron Cardinals in Overbrook. Instead of focusing on the game itself, the 9-year-old Stone often found his attention drifting to his surroundings: the smell of grass underfoot, the arguments between parents and umpires and the distinctive jingle of the nearby Italian ice truck.
NEWS
June 9, 2004 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since March, partisans of President Bush and Sen. John Kerry have poured about $151 million into TV ads that have aired approximately 140,000 times. Madison Avenue has deemed the commercials dull. Where's the buzz? What's the word at the watercooler? Try traveshamockery - a fake word sputtered by a mock candidate during a faux presidential debate in an ad for beer. "This whole thing is a travesty and a sham and a mockery! It's a traveshamockery!" yells comedian Bob Odenkirk, of the '90s HBO cult hit The Show.
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