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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1989 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
What do you call a movie that combines the human-rights fervor of The Official Story with the human-wrongs fever of Psycho, photographed with the louvered lighting and erotic suggestion of a high-fashion spread? Apartment Zero. Give it zero for conduct, zero for concept and 100 for chutzpah. Directed by Argentine filmmaker Martin Donovan, who co-wrote the screenplay with David Koepp, Apartment Zero is an exalted student movie, though more handsomely shot and professionally acted than that might suggest.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In her memory play The Magic Fire, Lillian Groag paints an expressive, warm and colorful portrait of her family. Rich in personalities and detail, it is a highly theatrical piece, and the Wilma Theater's production is wonderfully evocative. Yet one leaves the theater with a nagging sense of incompleteness. The author of a memory play has to decide how faithful to be to recollections and images of the past, and how much to sacrifice in the interest of drama. Groag opts to be true to the situation as she sees it (mixed, perhaps, with what she would have hoped for)
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writers
Three Argentines have been arrested in Buenos Aires in connection with the seizure of 2,474 pounds of cocaine aboard a ship in Philadelphia, Drug Enforcement Administration officials said yesterday. DEA spokeswoman Mary Vaira said Argentine federal police, working with DEA and U.S. Customs Service agents, yesterday arrested Carlos Alberto Diaz, Daniel Fernando Pena and Carmelo Alberto Capone. All are described as being in their early 30s and were arrested at their homes or businesses, Vaira said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
In Buenos Aires, there are two restaurants named El Quebracho - "the old cedar tree. " Because the cedar is a popular and plentiful tree in Argentina, it has become a symbol of home and stability. Giving a restaurant that name implies a nurturing atmosphere. At either restaurant, you can enjoy such specialties as chorizo, tortillas, grilled beef items and creamy corn soup. Delicious, I am told. Fortunately, you don't have to go to Argentina to find out. The owners have conveniently brought a branch of the old cedar tree to Philadelphia and planted it on Chestnut Street, near 19th Street.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By Kathleen Wheaton, Special to The Inquirer
Around the corner from the supermarket where I shop here is a turn-of-the- century mansion that fills a city block. The house is now occupied by the Argentine Foreign Ministry, but peering through the wrought-iron gates into a patio full of dusty palms and weather-beaten cupids, it's easy to imagine a young woman in a flapper dress sitting at one of the casements, watching her beau saunter toward her across the Plaza San Martin. Sixty years ago, the young woman's father was one of the wealthiest cattle ranchers in a city full of wealthy ranchers.
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | By Jack Severson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The broad boulevards and the French Renaissance touches on the opera house say Paris. The Italianate equestrian statuary bespeaks Rome. The throngs of impeccably stylish residents strolling the streets at midnight, en route to dinner, are reminiscent of Madrid or Barcelona. But this is none of those European capitals. This city, so European in style, sophistication, atmosphere - everything but location - is the surprising capital of the second-largest country in South America. Park yourself at a sidewalk-cafe table on the edge of a leafy plaza, sip a strong, dark espresso or an ice cold chopp (mug)
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Streams of carnations dropped from the top tier of the Teatro Colon last night, capping the Philadelphia Orchestra's immensely moving performance of Brahms' Second Symphony in its first of four scheduled concerts here, the second leg of its South American tour. The flowers are a local custom, perpetuated by Buenos Aires music students. And since music director Riccardo Muti has a genuine love for flowers, the tribute won't soon be forgotten. But an even more moving moment occurred when, after three curtain calls and before his first encore, Muti turned to the audience and said triumphantly, "Teatro Colon, Verdi.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | Daily News wire services
BUENOS AIRES IRANIANS LINKED TO CENTER BOMBING A federal judge issued an order yesterday for the capture of four Iranian citizens in connection with last month's deadly car-bombing of a Jewish community center. Ahmad Allameh Falsafi, Mahvash Monsef Gholamreza, Akbar Parvaresch and Abbas Zarrabi Krorasani were identified in local news reports as employees of the Iranian Embassy in Buenos Aires. Their whereabouts are unknown. The July 18 bombing killed 95 people and injured more than 200.
TRAVEL
September 18, 2011
Trying to save a buck? Here is ShermansTravel.com's list of the cities with the best free attractions. 1. Berlin 2. Buenos Aires 3. Chicago 4. Hong Kong 5. Istanbul 6. London 7. New York City 8. Rome 9. Seattle 10. Washington, D.C. - Houston Chronicle
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
March 11, 2013 | By E. Graham Robb, For The Inquirer
Early on a chilly morning, my 25-year-old son and I could detect the odor of burning garbage as we walked down a dirt road in a poverty-stricken section of Santa Fe, Argentina, bordered by ditches full of stagnant water. Ahead of us lay a day of construction work with a group of volunteers and local families, most of whom we had met only a few days earlier. We could not have been happier. Such is the experience you can expect on a Habitat for Humanity Global Village trip. I was the team leader for our group of 14 during a week in which we worked hand-in-hand with three "partner" families to repair and expand their homes.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | BY JOLIE DARROW, For the Daily News
ONE CAN only imagine what the late Joey Vento of Geno's fame would have thought of a cheesesteak joint where it's expected that customers will order in Spanish. But we assume that even Vento, who notoriously asked that his customers order in English, would have no beef with Rocky's Philly Steaks. After all, it's in Buenos Aires, Argentina. So, how on earth did the cheesesteak migrate 5,266 miles south? "I thought the Argentines would like the cheesesteak," explained Matthew J. McCarthy.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
End of an era in Buenos Aires BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - The wooden subway cars on the Buenos Aires subway's A-line will soon be replaced by Chinese-made rolling stock, and that has people in the Argentine capital nostalgic. The 90 Belgian cars began rolling in 1913 on Latin America's first subway line. And they are the oldest subway cars still operating in the world, carrying 160,000 passengers on the line daily. The old cars still attract tourists, but they've become increasingly difficult to maintain.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | By Damian Pachter, Associated Press
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Thousands of people flooded the streets of Argentina's capital Thursday night in one of the country's biggest antigovernment protests in more than a decade. Angered by rising inflation, violent crime and high-profile corruption, and afraid President Cristina Fernandez will try to hold onto power indefinitely by ending constitutional term limits, the protesters marched on the iconic obelisk in Buenos Aires chanting: "We're not afraid. " Demonstrators reached the presidential residence in scorching summer heat banging on pots, whistling, and holding banners that read: "Stop the wave of Argentines killed by crime, enough with corruption and say no to the constitutional reform.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Michael Warren and Debora Rey, Associated Press
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Nelida Montoya is tormented by the image of a faraway tomb on a lonely hillside in the South Atlantic, where instead of the name of her son, a gravestone reads "Argentine soldier known only to God. " Horacio Echave was only 19 when he died in the Falkland Islands on the last day of fighting against British forces, a war that ended the Argentines' 74-day occupation of the archipelago they claim as their Islas Malvinas....
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | By Dara McBride and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Below a ceiling draped in blue and white twinkle lights, people of all ages danced the Argentine tango Sunday afternoon at the darkened Ruba Club in Northern Liberties. Some wore sneakers, others were in dress shoes. Meredith Klein, 37, codirector of the Philadelphia Argentine Tango School, looked to her six years in Buenos Aires to describe what she saw. "Tiene onda," she said in Spanish: there was a good vibe. The dance was one of many workshops at the club associated with the four-day Philadelphia Tango Festival, which ends Monday.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
Eduardo Luis Duhalde, Argentina's human-rights secretary and a prominent voice in denouncing abuses during the country's military dictatorship in the 1970s and 80s, died Tuesday in Buenos Aires. He had undergone surgery in February for an aortic aneurysm, and in recent days had suffered complications. Mr. Duhalde had been the country's human-rights secretary since 2003, when he was appointed by the late President Nestor Kirchner. At the start of the military dictatorship that lasted from 1976 to 1983, Argentina's authorities ordered Mr. Duhalde's capture and he went into exile in Spain.
SPORTS
February 26, 2012
Rory McIlroy and Lee Westwood set up a high-stakes showdown in the semifinals of the Match Play Championship in Marana, Ariz. Westwood erased an early deficit to beat Martin Laird, 3 and 2. McIlroy never trailed in beating Bae Sang-moon of South Korea by the same margin Saturday. They play each other in the semifinals Sunday morning, each with a shot at No. 1 in the world if they go on to win this World Golf Championship. ROWING: The Schuylkill Navy honored the following at the annual awards banquet: coach of the year, Mike Brown , Merion Mercy Academy; masters of the year, Theresa Savard , Philadelphia Girls' Rowing Club, and Ted Trocky , Malta Boat Club; and athletes of the year, Megan Walsh and Catherine Reddick , Vesper Boat Club, and Joe Spencer and Steve Kasprzyk , Penn Athletic Club, and Jason Read , Temple University and Penn Athletic Club.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Michael Warren, Associated Press
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Argentina's deadliest train accident in decades was foreseeable and preventable, the nation's auditor general complained Thursday, saying that years of failed safety tests and other problems had given the government more than enough reason to cancel the train operator's concession. Others pointed to high-level corruption: years-old allegations still awaiting trial that a former transportation secretary took free vacations and other gifts from executives of the Trains of Buenos Aires company in exchange for favorable treatment.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Michael Warren, Associated Press
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - The first two cars were packed as usual for the morning rush, so tightly that people stood pressed flesh to flesh, sandwiched between bicycles and the few seats, many without so much as a strap to hold on to. This train didn't lurch, though. It had trouble stopping at all, overshooting platform after platform and missing at least one station entirely as it rushed toward the end of the line. The train didn't come to a halt until it had slammed into a metal barrier at Buenos Aires' Once station.
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