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Buffalo Soldiers

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
'Be All That You Can Be" reads the Army poster affixed to a wall on a U.S. military base in West Germany, in the days before the Berlin Wall came tumbling down. And in the pitch-dark comedy Buffalo Soldiers, Pvt. Ray Elwood (Joaquin Phoenix) is doing his darnedest to follow those orders: He's driving a Mercedes, sleeping with the colonel's wife, running a thriving heroin operation, and selling truckloads of weapons on the black market. A sharp satire that presents a stinging portrait of a military teeming with crooks and incompetents, Buffalo Soldiers - adapted from Robert O'Connor's novel - boasts a noirish script and a top-drawer cast.
NEWS
November 23, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry D. Palmer Sr., 99, of Trevose, who taught horseback riding at the U.S. Military Academy as a member of an Army unit known as the Buffalo Soldiers, died Wednesday, Nov. 17, at the home of a daughter, Georgann Beverly, in Germantown. At 17, he joined the Army and was assigned to the 10th U.S. Calvary Regiment at West Point, N.Y. Mr. Palmer, whose two older brothers were also in the unit, spent 14 years at West Point, where he taught horseback riding, mounted drill and tactics, and polo to cadets.
NEWS
February 9, 1998 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
You could call them the few, the proud and the almost-forgotten. They are the Buffalo Soldiers, the surviving members of the 9th and 10th Cavalry regiments and the 24th and 25th Infantry regiments, which comprised African-American men from the post-Civil War era up until 1952, when President Harry S Truman ordered the desegregation of the American military. The group fought racism, substandard equipment and poor living conditions for a chance to charge up San Juan Hill with Teddy Roosevelt and capture Geronimo.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | By Acel Moore
The riders aboard prancing steeds were unmistakably attired in authentic U.S. Cavalry uniforms from the days of the Old West - dark-blue jackets with yellow chevrons, trim, sky-blue pants, billed caps and square-toed, knee-high boots with spurs. They carried sabers sheathed in silver scabbards. They had a look of intense pride, these soldiers, all but one of whom was black. "Who are those men on horses, Daddy?" my mesmerized 5 1/2-year-old daughter asked as the troop, five dozen strong, thundered past during last year's Thanksgiving Day parade.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2003 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
"Buffalo Soldiers" opens with a shot of U.S. Army grunts walking on what looks like an American flag. Director Gregor Jordan gradually reveals that what we're seeing trampled is a mural, not the real deal, but the message is clear: This isn't a military movie for Bushies. Sure, there are lots of guns and tanks and huge explosions - the sort of violence that seems to quicken the pulse of most moral conservatives - but the movie's mayhem is being inflicted by American soldiers upon American soldiers, and that just doesn't happen, does it?
NEWS
March 7, 1986 | By JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writer
If there was ever a time for a modern-day battle cry of "Cavalry to the Rescue!" it was the night Bob Ferguson charged down 58th Street in Southwest Philadelphia to save a blind man from a burning home. That's because Ferguson is a contemporary cavalryman, a member of a group of men who fashion themselves - complete with uniforms and horses - after the only all-black U.S. Cavalry units (the 9th and 10th) that rode through the Wild West from 1866 to 1875. The name of Ferguson's group is the Buffalo Soldiers, which is what the two units were called.
NEWS
August 21, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / VICKI VALERIO
At the Belmont stables in Fairmount Park, Henry Washington (left) and George Howe wait for the start of graduation ceremonies for Temple University's Community Outreach Program. The men were dressed as Buffalo Soldiers for yesterday's event.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | By Christopher Merrill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Restless and fidgety, about 100 elementary pupils nudged each other and chattered in their school auditorium until their visitor made them look into the past. "I'd like for you to imagine wagons burning, children crying and women praying. Then, out of nowhere, a bugle blows and the U.S. Cavalry comes to the rescue," he said, letting the familiar story sink in. "But what is missing? The cavalry that came to the rescue was black. " Houston Wedlock, a former paratrooper in Vietnam, was back in uniform yesterday as he paced in front of the Devon Elementary School students, this time wearing the gold-trimmed blue of the cavalry.
NEWS
May 2, 2001 | By Mark Stroh INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The front-porch package thief has been caught, police said yesterday, but the historic flags he stole went up in smoke. The flags - a one-of-a-kind swallowtail guidon carried by the Buffalo Soldiers, a famous African American Army regiment, and a 13-star Civil War-era banner - were stolen April 9 from collector Jeffrey Kohn's home. They had been delivered by separate mail carriers and left at his front door. On Saturday, Cheltenham police arrested Rodney Hines of the 800 block of Township Line Road, Elkins Park, for what they said was the theft of another package.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
If Spike Lee's Miracle at St. Anna were a symphony, you'd think, three sublime movements, a fourth that's turgid, and what's with the wacky coda? Adapted by James McBride from his best-seller, Miracle is, by turns, a dazzling, dim, lucid, confounding, absorbing, tedious, silly, profound, bloody and - 160 minutes and almost as many subplots later - bracing account of four African American infantrymen separated from their Buffalo Soldiers unit in Tuscany during World War II. The film opens in 1983 as one of the soldiers, Hector (Laz Alonso)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In the months before his death, the Rev. James A. Benson kept working on exhibits for his museum in Lawnside. "He was sick in the hospital, cutting things out of the newspaper and using the nurses' tape," Benson's widow, Ellen, recalls. "He was always asking, 'What's going on at the museum?' " A retired Lawnside postmaster, she's grateful that her husband - who was 81 when he died of leukemia Dec. 8 - doesn't have to hear the answer to his frequent question. The Benson History Museum he founded, owned, and operated (at no charge to visitors)
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spencer C. Moore II, 91, of Magnolia, a decorated member of the Buffalo Soldiers Army unit during World War II, died Saturday, June 1, at Virtua Berlin, the medical center there. In 2008, Mr. Moore spoke at the 60th anniversary celebration of the desegregation of the military, in the rotunda of the Capitol, son Michael Sr. said. Among the other speakers was former Secretary of State Colin Powell. Mr. Moore was a vice president and life member of the Lawnside Historical Society and a vice president and charter member of the Magnolia Historical Society.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
After suffering a series of setbacks in the early days of the Korean War, U.S. officials were anxious for a victory. They got it on July 21, 1950, when the Buffalo Soldiers of the Army's 24th Infantry Regiment, which had just arrived in Korea, retook Yechon in a counterattack. Though the victory was short-lived, U.S. Rep. Thomas Lane of Massachusetts stood before the House and praised the black troops "who believed not only in the United States as it is, but in the nation that it will become when intolerance is also defeated.
NEWS
November 23, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harry D. Palmer Sr., 99, of Trevose, who taught horseback riding at the U.S. Military Academy as a member of an Army unit known as the Buffalo Soldiers, died Wednesday, Nov. 17, at the home of a daughter, Georgann Beverly, in Germantown. At 17, he joined the Army and was assigned to the 10th U.S. Calvary Regiment at West Point, N.Y. Mr. Palmer, whose two older brothers were also in the unit, spent 14 years at West Point, where he taught horseback riding, mounted drill and tactics, and polo to cadets.
NEWS
August 30, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
ELLIS W. DEAN, a wounded and decorated Army veteran of the Korean War who in civilian life became a strong advocate for veterans, died Thursday. He was 82 and lived in Ambler. Ellis was a member of the historic 24th Infantry Regiment, an all-black "Buffalo Soldier" unit founded in 1869. The 24th fought throughout the Korean peninsula, from the Pusan perimeter and well into North Korea before the Chinese intervention that drove the Allied forces back. Ellis was wounded and received the Purple Heart Medal, among other decorations.
NEWS
July 28, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
HENRY TYLER Washington made it his life's work to tell people about the "Buffalo Soldiers. " A proud member of that legendary band of African-Americans who fought in every war from the Indian campaigns of the 19th century through World War II, Vietnam and Iraq, Henry donned his military regalia with all his ribbons and insignia and traveled the country to talk about those soldiers and his own experiences. He talked with young people and military personnel. He visited bases, spoke at universities, military academies, churches, conventions - wherever he could get a receptive audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2010 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Everett Staten of Elkins Park, an events planner by trade, believes there is a continued need to remind the public about the positive aspects of African American culture from a grassroots level. His Black History Showcase gives "an opportunity for those who have wonderful private collections to show them off. " The special theme of this year's showcase, to be held at the Convention Center next weekend, Feb. 13 and 14, will be the history of blacks in sports, Staten said. There will be some Philadelphia-specific exhibits - one about basketball great Wilt Chamberlain, for instance, and another spotlighting the Philadelphia Stars baseball team, with visits from three of the original Stars: Mahlon Duckett, Harold Gould and Bill "Ready" Cash.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
If Spike Lee's Miracle at St. Anna were a symphony, you'd think, three sublime movements, a fourth that's turgid, and what's with the wacky coda? Adapted by James McBride from his best-seller, Miracle is, by turns, a dazzling, dim, lucid, confounding, absorbing, tedious, silly, profound, bloody and - 160 minutes and almost as many subplots later - bracing account of four African American infantrymen separated from their Buffalo Soldiers unit in Tuscany during World War II. The film opens in 1983 as one of the soldiers, Hector (Laz Alonso)
NEWS
February 23, 2007 | By JILLIAN BAUER For the Daily News
BEFORE PHILADELPHIA native Everett Staten went off to college, American history was his least favorite class. "History was my worst subject in school," Staten said. "American history was basically politics and military, and the only thing it included about African-Americans was being slaves. " Years later, determined to publicize the untold accounts of African-American history, Staten founded the Black History Showcase, a free event featuring a variety of privately owned exhibits and activities composed of real people, objects and stories, with the intention to boost African-American pride and encourage tolerance between races.
NEWS
June 20, 2004 | By Leslie A. Pappas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Freedom came in a parade on horseback, with black cowboys, Buffalo Soldiers, and the United States Colored Troops. Starting yesterday's Juneteenth celebration in Fairmount Park, the uniformed men hoped they would remind people of the day's meaning. "People who do not know are asking questions about what it is," said Sgt. Maj. Joseph Lee, 65, of South Philadelphia, cofounder of the Third Regiment Infantry of the United States Colored Troops, a reenactment group. Lee rode through the neighborhood with about 50 others before making camp on Lemon Hill near Poplar Street.
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