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Building Projects

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NEWS
September 27, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
The Marple Newtown school board has reviewed the progress of capital improvement projects throughout the district. Board vice president Jonathan Freeze, who also sits on the board's building committee, Tuesday night distributed a report of projects completed or under way in the district. Among the projects expected to be completed next month are the roofing of district buildings, fuel tank replacements and the installation of playground equipment at Russell Elementary School and a sound system at the high school.
NEWS
January 22, 1986 | By Dan Meyers, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The state Senate voted 47-0 yesterday to issue bonds to pay for construction projects whose funding had been stalled by debate over the proposed Center City convention center. The General Services Department had been forced earlier this month to write letters to about 500 contractors working on state projects asking them to continue to work even though the state could not pay them. The delay had, or could have, affected projects for Graterford Prison in Montgomery County, SEPTA, and Temple University, among about 60 projects statewide.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
In an era of rising tax rates, West Chester school board member James Davison knows his proposal will not be popular. Davison is recommending that the school board create a special capital construction fund to be used to pay for building projects at the district's 15 schools after the current capital fund is used up. "I know this would be an unpopular idea," he said in an interview last week. Tax revenues would be shifted from normal school operations to finance the fund.
NEWS
May 1, 1996 | By Jennifer Van Doren, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Despite the ferocious wind, the torrents of rain and the peals of thunder, U.S. Rep. James Greenwood said God was looking favorably on the group that had crowded under the white tent yesterday. "He's bestowed his favor on this project by making the ground as soft as possible," exclaimed Greenwood to chuckles from the group of about 100 who gathered for a groundbreaking ceremony for the aerospace firm Lockheed Martin and Holy Family College. In October, after months of heavy lobbying, Lockheed Martin bought 52 acres from the college to build a Communications and Power Center.
NEWS
April 4, 2003 | By Ernest E. Jones
There are two pieces of information that are excellent starting points in any discussion on the use of minority workers in constructing the Eagles stadium and the Phillies ballpark: 1. According to the African American Chamber of Commerce, over the last several years, less than 1 percent of the construction dollars spent in Philadelphia have gone to minority-owned firms. 2. It has been reported that within the building trades unions, none, with the exception of the laborers, has a minority membership of more than 10 percent.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1992 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce totals up all the significant construction projects on the horizon for the area, as it has each of the last three years, one fact stands out. Most of the big jobs out there are being paid for from the public purse. "I think that the consensus across the three years is a disappointment with the lack of private-sector work," says Thomas Widing, the chamber vice president who compiles information for the chamber's annual construction seminar.
NEWS
April 13, 2003 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia, the area's leading social-service provider, is in the midst of a major wave of construction projects to upgrade its human-services operations. The work, costing $41 million, is being financed largely through an unprecedented bond package that the archdiocese negotiated with the Chester County Industrial Development Authority. The projects are under way as the archdiocese is considering cutting its administrative budget by about 20 percent. Msgr.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | By Jennifer Reid Holman, Inquirer Correspondent
The Maple Shade Township Council rolled up its sleeves and got down to business last week, nipping and tucking nearly $480,000 from the school budget that voters defeated in the April 7 election. Some school board members, however, fearing the cuts will affect the quality of the district's education, said they may file an appeal asking the State Commissioner of Education to reinstate some of the deleted items. They have until May 13 to file. Under the new 1992-93 school budget that council proposed, the owner of a home assessed at $89,700 would pay an additional $72 in property taxes this year instead of the additional $135 the defeated budget called for. The tax rate would increase from the current $1.25 per $100 of assessed property value to $1.33.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | By Gary H. Sternberg, Special to The Inquirer
Taxpayers will be the ultimate beneficiaries of recently announced plans by the state commissioner of education to speed up the approval process for school building projects, according to school officials in Camden County. "We are very happy to know that the commissioner is trying to make arrangements," said Howard Phifer, superintendent of the Pennsauken School District, where $17 million worth of building projects at five of its schools is pending. "Every month that goes by the cost goes up due to inflation," Phifer said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
During a 2013 preelection tour of colleges, Gov. Christie and other state officials, including top Democrats, took golden shovels in hand for "ceremonial groundbreakings" heralding state funding of a construction boom to increase capacity at New Jersey campuses. A year later, some South Jersey projects drawing on a voter-approved $750 million capital fund are underway, such as several buildings at the community college in Gloucester County. But on other "shovel-ready" projects the state approved last year, physical work has not progressed since Christie's tour, which, in one case, required bringing in a pile of dirt for the event.
REAL_ESTATE
September 1, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
West Deptford High School student Elizabeth Pass says she never realized how complicated it was to select the appropriate paint color for a room. "It is a lot harder than I thought," said Pass, an aspiring engineer who is interested in design, and who likes to "know how things work and how they're put together. " Pass and fellow student Aja Andrews, members of the Gloucester County school's Distributive Education Club of America chapter, helped design the interior of a model home at D.R. Horton's the Fields at West Deptford single-family community, at Parkville Station and West Jessup Road.
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HARRY M. PERKS was the guy who got things done. Whether it was supervising the building of the Pennsylvania Convention Center and monitoring its expansion, building new public schools, renovating the library, the zoo and the Academy of Music, building Veterans Stadium, the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts and myriad other construction projects. Oh, as the city streets commissioner in the 1980s, he coped with Philadelphia's periodically critical trash-disposal problem. When the convention center was completed on time and on budget in 1993, the late Willard G. Rouse III, then chairman of the center authority, gave full credit to Harry Perks, the executive director.
NEWS
July 14, 2012 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
She'll talk after all. After a six-month standoff, former state Supreme Court Justice Sandra Schultz Newman gave up the fight Thursday and said she would answer questions in a lawsuit over the controversial effort to build a new, $200 million Family Court building. Her reversal came one day after she appeared at a law office at the court-ordered time for a deposition and then refused to answer questions or turn over thousands of pages of documents. Newman has decided to waive her claim that she had immunity from the process, though she still believes that she has it, according to her lawyer, Gene D. Cohen.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Nancy Burd
‘Set in Stone," the University of Chicago Cultural Policy Center's recently released study about the misguided cultural building boom of the 1990s and 2000s, has generated commentary around the country, including in The Inquirer. The study portrays a climate of cultural organizations gone wild, betting their futures on their ability to build and manage glamorous new buildings. Sadly, the good advice of the study and the ensuing commentary is being offered with 20/20 hindsight to many organizations that are now in financial turmoil as a result of such projects.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The damaged stone veneer at the entrance of Camden's Lanning Square School at Fetters is enough of a hazard that repairing it is among 76 projects designated a high priority Monday by the state Schools Development Authority. But the seemingly welcome news was met with anger and suspicion by some city residents and activists, who wondered when Lanning Square children will get the new school they have awaited since 2002. The old Lanning Square Elementary was demolished in 2005, and its students were divided between Fetters and another century-old school - temporarily, residents were told - while a replacement was to be built.
TRAVEL
March 11, 2012 | By Si Liberman, For The Inquirer
SOCHI, Russia - If he were alive today, Joseph Stalin wouldn't recognize the place. This subtropical Black Sea resort of nearly 350,000 residents at the foot of the snowcapped Caucasus Mountains is on the verge of becoming a major international destination since being designated the site of the 2014 Winter Olympics and the 2018 World Cup. More than 100 building projects are under way, as a capitalist fervor grips the city, fueled by...
BUSINESS
February 20, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Private construction companies hope to slap tolls on I-95, U.S. 422, and other crowded freeways. They're using the antitax, spending-cut mood gripping voters and state capitals, after three years of recession, to push for private highway, bridge, and building projects. Companies would replace governments in financing these projects up front, and collecting tolls from users, to reap future profits. A proposal gaining steam in Harrisburg would set up a "Public-Private Transportation Partnership Board," appointed by the governor and state legislators, to decide what to build and which builders to hire.
NEWS
February 6, 2011 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For eight years, Gov. Ed Rendell trumpeted a program that shelled out $2 billion for building projects, including sports stadiums, museum wings, hospital additions, and factory expansions. The goal: Create jobs, stir the economy, and preserve Pennsylvania's heritage. Legislators pitched many of the projects, and the governor chose which got funded - typically without any debate or public discussion. Now, a looming state deficit, a swelling debt load, and criticism of some of Rendell's last grants - $10 million each that was initially alotted for an Arlen Specter Library and a John Murtha Public Policy Center, for instance - have unleashed a new round of scrutiny on the Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program, called R-Cap.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2009 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it comes to building projects, this one's a monster. The construction zone is essentially the entire country. The builders are a variety of specialists, including architects, plumbers, masons, and lighting, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning experts. Since July, they have been meeting in cities - they were in Philadelphia last month - to construct not with bricks and steel beams, but with words. The goal: a code to guide all development of green commercial buildings in the United States.
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