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Bulgaria

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NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Susan Bennett, Inquirer Washington Bureau Reuters contributed to this article
U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker 3d, greeted by crowds chanting, "Bye-bye, communists," yesterday warned government leaders here that Bulgaria's relationship with the United States would depend on the legitimacy of elections planned later this year. Baker, who flew here at the conclusion of arms talks with the Soviets in Moscow, met with representatives of the interim government and with leaders of opposition groups. In a 90-minute meeting, Baker told President Petar Mladenov and other leaders of the transitional government that the world was watching Bulgaria to see whether May elections would be free and fair.
SPORTS
June 22, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
The big guy in the middle from Nigeria can play. He showed that to America and the rest of the world last night. No, it wasn't Hakeem Olajuwon. This dream was turned in by Rashidi Yekini, who scored the opening goal and assisted on another to help Nigeria win its World Cup debut, 3-0, over Bulgaria at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas. It was the biggest World Cup victory by an African nation and marked the second consecutive impressive start for a new finalist from Africa. Cameroon was the sensation of the 1990 World Cup by reaching the quarterfinals.
NEWS
September 5, 1993 | By Robert J. Ravelli, FOR THE INQUIRER
Picture the following scenario: a city with limited funds; a crumbling infrastructure; a declining industrial base due to foreign competition and the loss of trading partners; high unemployment; population loss; a transit system in disrepair, and insufficient help from a national government paralyzed by resistance to change. I'm not describing Philadelphia, although in some ways, I could be. This description is of Gabrovo in central Bulgaria - and for that matter of all cities in this nation, now in its post-communist period.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | By Marguerite P. Jones, Special to The Inquirer
The former mayor of New Hope is packing his bags - literally. Edward C. Connolly stepped down from his post as mayor last week to head east for seven months. In February, Connolly will join his wife, Janet, in Bulgaria, where she is teaching anthropology. "I hated to do it," Connolly, 64, said of resigning his job as mayor. "The people of New Hope have been wonderful. " But, he added, "it's about time for a change. I've been a lawyer for 38 years. " Connolly is a partner at Chandor, Connolly, Schwartz, Drexler, McCullough & Lyons in Warminster.
FOOD
May 31, 2007
I'm a feta fanatic, especially when warm weather starts to beg for light salads filled with the season's cucumber and tomato. But even I was stunned by the vast selection of the crumbly white Mediterranean cheese that I found at Bell's Market in the Northeast. Bell's has a primarily Russian clientele, but I counted 20 varieties of sheep's milk feta on display from countries as diverse as Bulgaria, France, Greece, Denmark and Turkey. Each has a different flavor profile, but Bulgaria's is my all-time favorite.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
Patriarch Maxim of Bulgaria, 98, who weathered a revolt over his communist-era ties to lead the Balkan country's Orthodox Christians for more than 40 years, has died. The patriarch died of heart failure early Tuesday at a Sofia hospital where he had been for a month, the Holy Synod said in a statement. Orthodox Christianity is Bulgaria's dominant religion, followed by more than 80 percent of the country's 7.4 million people. Maxim was the church's leader for more than four decades, bridging the country's transition from communism and withstanding efforts to oust him by the new democratic government and rebel priests who saw him as a communist stooge.
NEWS
August 1, 2011
Shulamit Shamir, 88, wife of former Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, died Friday in Tel Aviv. Ms. Shamir was born in Bulgaria in 1923. She was arrested upon arriving in what was then British-ruled Palestine because of a limitation on Jewish immigration and was sent to a detention camp. There she met Yitzhak Shamir, detained for his activities in a Jewish underground group. They married in 1944. Yitzhak Shamir, 95, served as prime minister from 1983 to 1984 and again from 1986 to 1992.
SPORTS
July 16, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
You watch and wonder when Carlos Alberto Parreira will get up. You watch and wonder when Arrigo Sacchi will shut up. Their bench demeanor couldn't be more different. Brazil's Parreira rarely leaves his seat to shout directions or exhort his players. Italy's Sacchi almost never sits down. Yet, there are similarities: Both World Cup coaches have been maligned by the media back home for nearly three years. Both have altered their team's style just enough to bring more criticism than praise.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | Associated Press
MOSCOW - A half-century-old tourist boat with 188 people on board listed and sank quickly in one of the world's largest reservoirs amid wind and rain yesterday, authorities and survivors said, and dozens of children were believed to be among the 101 people missing. Two bodies were recovered. About 30 children gathered in a cockpit in the double-decker Bulgaria moments before it sank into the reservoir on the Volga River, a survivor told the Interfax news agency. Russia's Vesti 24 television quoted another survivor as saying that the boat "tilted to the right and sank within minutes.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
Mubarak trial adjourned till Dec. CAIRO - The trial of Egypt's ousted leader Hosni Mubarak on charges of complicity in the killing of more than 800 protesters this year was adjourned on Sunday until Dec. 28. Mubarak's trial began nearly three months ago, and the lengthy adjournment was certain to frustrate leaders of the protest movement who want to see the former leader and his codefendants - his two sons, security chief, and six top police...
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NEWS
July 24, 2013
Syrian refugees stuck at border AMMAN, Jordan - Relief officials warned Tuesday of a brewing humanitarian crisis in southern Syria as rising violence reportedly continued to strand thousands of would-be refugees along the border with Jordan. According to rebel officials and local residents, an intensified government bombing campaign is obstructing roads and paths in the region, where 10,000 displaced people are said to have spent the last week in border towns and villages waiting to cross into Jordan.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. consumers and taxpayers usually pay more - often much more - than people in other developed nations for brand-name drugs, according to a series of papers published Monday in the journal   Health Affairs. Moreover, consumers here can't see through the fog of the pricing system to know how much their medicines should cost. "On a personal level, U.S. citizens pay prices sometimes twice as high as most other countries for identical drugs," Gerard Anderson, director of the Center for Hospital Finance and Management at Johns Hopkins University and a coauthor of one of the studies, said.
SPORTS
January 13, 2013 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Columnist
It is the most popular sport in the world, so it only makes sense that soccer would be infected with the universal virus that exists and thrives everywhere. Intolerance based on race, religion, sexual orientation, secular origin and other factors was the world's game long before humans decided to kick a ball into a net. So I'm not sure what more FIFA, the governing body of soccer, can do to eliminate the acts of hate that routinely occur in matches throughout the world. FIFA already has taken a strict stance against discrimination - not with merely colorful slogans saying "End Racism.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
Patriarch Maxim of Bulgaria, 98, who weathered a revolt over his communist-era ties to lead the Balkan country's Orthodox Christians for more than 40 years, has died. The patriarch died of heart failure early Tuesday at a Sofia hospital where he had been for a month, the Holy Synod said in a statement. Orthodox Christianity is Bulgaria's dominant religion, followed by more than 80 percent of the country's 7.4 million people. Maxim was the church's leader for more than four decades, bridging the country's transition from communism and withstanding efforts to oust him by the new democratic government and rebel priests who saw him as a communist stooge.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Aron Heller and Veselin Toshkov, Associated Press
SOFIA, Bulgaria - Israel vowed Wednesday to strike back at Iran, blaming the Islamic Republic for a brazen daylight bombing that targeted a bus full of Israeli tourists in Bulgaria and killed at least seven people. President Obama termed it a "barbaric terrorist attack. " The U.S. leader called Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to express his sorrow over the attack and pledged assistance to bring the perpetrators to justice, according to statements from the two leaders' offices.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Nick Dumitrache and Veselin Toshkov, Associated Press
BURGAS, Bulgaria - He looked like any other impatient tourist checking the big board at airport arrivals: a lanky, long-haired man in a baseball cap with his hands in the pockets of his plaid Bermuda shorts, a bulky backpack hanging from his shoulders. Minutes later, authorities say, the man, filmed by security cameras at the Burgas airport, would board a bus filled with young Israeli tourists and blow himself up, killing six others as well. Authorities looked Thursday for clues as to who he was, using his fingerprints, his DNA and his fake Michigan driver's license.
SPORTS
July 7, 2012
The Miami Herald, citing a tweet from Miami Heat owner Micky Arison , said on Friday that Ray Allen is leaving the Boston Celtics to join the NBA champions. Allen's decision was later confirmed by his agent. Arison tweeted, "Its 2:30am in London and I was just woken up with great news. Welcome to the family #20!!" Allen can't sign with the Heat until July 11, the first day allowed by NBA rules. Allen rejected a larger financial offer from the Celtics to accept a multiyear deal from the Heat, according to multiple reports.
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers
A HUGE PORTRAIT of Polina Kadiyska keeps watch over Washington Avenue near Broad from the window of the Rock School for Dance Education, her lithe dancer's body frozen in midair in the rhythms of a routine. The picture overlooks the street where the young ballerina moved for the last time. A Rock School student from Bulgaria - who also apparently worked on the side as hired eye-candy for parties - Kadiyska, 22, died yesterday after being run down Sunday allegedly by a drunken teenage driver.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Jovana Gec, Associated Press
BELGRADE, Serbia - Overwhelmed by deep snow and harsh temperatures, some countries in Europe closed down schools and struggled to run public transport Monday, as post-snow rains caused a dam to collapse in Bulgaria, flooding a village and killing at least four. Four others were killed by floods in southern Bulgaria, and 10 people were missing, authorities said. Europeans across the continent were digging out from heavy snow after a week of bitter cold in which the number of dead - mostly homeless people - continued to rise by the day. Temperatures have fallen as low as minus 33 degrees Fahrenheit in Ukraine, the hardest-hit country.
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