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Bulge

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NEWS
July 26, 1991 | BY DOROTHY A. PETRONE
You can never be too broke or too fat. Every combat fatigued veteran in the battle of the bulge know this. Last year, Weight Watchers reported revenues of one-third of a billion dollars - from the females in my immediate family alone. Imagine what they grossed in addition to endearing endomorphs Aunt Rosa and Aunt Connie. Weight loss is big business which, like Aunt Rosa's waistline, gets bigger every day. All due to BlubberGate, a secret government plot to keep the economy and stretch pants alive.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
"I can still see them charging us, burp guns blazing away. " Today, 45 years later, Darby Borough resident Charles Gallagher vividly recalls his involvement in what is generally regarded as the greatest American battle of World War II - the Battle of the Bulge. The battle began Dec. 16, 1944, when three German armies struck the U.S. First Army in the Ardennes region of Belgium and Luxembourg. By Christmas Day, the Germans had created a triangular bulge 50 miles wide at the base and 60 miles deep that gave the battle its name.
NEWS
December 16, 2004 | By CHRISTOPHER GIBBONS
THE LIGHT snow fell steadily in the Ardennes Forest of southern Belgium during the early morning hours of Dec. 16, 1944. American soldiers slept soundly. The prevailing opinion was that the German army was nearly defeated and couldn't mount an offensive of any significance. But at 5:30 a.m., the stunned U.S. 1st Army division found out how badly they had miscalculated. Eight German armored and 13 infantry divisions launched an all-out attack. It was the beginning of what came to be known as the Battle of the Bulge, the largest land battle of World War II in which the U.S. participated.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | By Michelle R. Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Stanley Wojtusik remembers crouching in a four-man foxhole in the the Ardennes Forest in Belgium during the winter of 1944. He was 18, just out of high school, and the Battle of the Bulge was his first encounter with the German army. Snow fell constantly, whipped up by a bitter wind and used by the Germans to their best advantage. "(The Germans) cleverly dressed in white to blend in with the snow," said Wojtusik, 65, of Philadelphia. "They wore white helmets, but they stood out against the tree trunks.
NEWS
May 9, 1995 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 83d Infantry Division insignia - the one with the five battle stars and the "Thunderbolt" nickname - was visible on the bolo tie clasp that rested on his chest. The medals affixed to his cap, including the Silver and Bronze Stars and Purple Heart, caught the glint of the sun. But it was only during the playing of "Taps," when he hoisted himself out of his wheelchair with his left hand and saluted with his right, that you could read the words on the back of Norman Schuster's jacket: "Battered bastards of the Bulge.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | By Mary Gagnier, Special to The Inquirer
It was worth it. The fear. The December nights spent huddled together in a freezing barn. The picturesque villages marred by bombs and filled with the stench of death and dying. This weekend, on the 45th anniversary of the start of the Battle of the Bulge in World War II, Ted Schneider remembered all the horrible sights and sounds of that pivotal campaign. And he concluded once again: It was worth it. Schneider, a 71-year-old New Hope councilman and activist, was a 26-year- old American infantryman during that fight to drive the German army out of Belgium and Luxembourg.
NEWS
December 31, 2013 | Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER COLUMNIST
The box arrived at Ted Nobles' house in Middletown, Del., two days before Christmas, and, for the longest time, he let it sit there, unopened. "I was overwhelmed," he says. The sender was an older man in Fresno, Calif., a vet who had served in the same part of Europe during World War II as Nobles' great-uncle Wally. For more than a decade, Nobles had been researching the history of his family, including his maternal grandmother's only sibling, Lt. Wallace Lippincott Jr. - a Chester-born Quaker from Swarthmore who after graduating from the University of Delaware went off to war, drove a tank into the Battle of the Bulge, and never returned.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
A dwindling group of elderly Philadelphia veterans wants to build a Battle of the Bulge memorial in Washington Square, a site within the city's Historic Mile they believe is a fitting place to remember the key World War II confrontation. In the process, they are fighting a new battle - against bureaucracy and time. They need money, political will, and permission from local and federal government agencies. "We're the only major city in the country that doesn't have a monument to the Battle of the Bulge," said Norbert McGettigan, 89, who grew up in Overbrook and lives in Woodside Park.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard Becker felt the blow to his helmet and was sure his luck had run out. He was the only member of his 12-man squad who hadn't been killed or wounded as enemy tanks shelled the snowy Ardennes forest during the Germans' last-ditch effort to stop the Allies' advance during World War II. So when Becker removed his helmet and saw the jagged gash through the metal, he sat back and waited to die. He couldn't bring himself to feel the back of...
NEWS
November 29, 1993 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Stanley Wojtusik still remembers the surprise attack the German army sprang on his division on Dec. 16, 1944, while they were hunkered down in foxholes along a craggy, wooded plateau called the Ardennes in northern France. "They started firing mortars, and we were worried about the shrapnel and the large fir trees that were falling on top of us," he said. "That winter, it was too cold to fight. Even the gasoline froze. " Despite the German forces' initial surge, which gave them an advantage, the Allies rallied to turn the tide in what became known as the Battle of the Bulge, the last major Nazi offensive of World War II. It is the bravery and sacrifice of the 600,000 U.S. soldiers and countless soldiers from Belgium and Luxembourg, men who fought in extreme cold for six weeks, that Wojtusik wants the world to remember.
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TRAVEL
May 25, 2015 | By Susan Miller, For The Inquirer
My father, Maurice "Moose" Berry, was in the 104th Regiment, 26th Infantry Division and fought in the Ardennes, where he was wounded, and in the Battle of the Bulge. Over the years, he revisited places where he had seen combat, and he toured American Battle Monument Cemeteries with my mother and my husband. In 2005, he photographed the grave markers of all the men of the 26th who lost their lives in Europe. When my father told me in November 2013 he wanted to return, I wanted to go with him. We planned our visit to coincide with the 2014 Memorial Day ceremony at the Lorraine Cemetery in St. Avold, France; with more than 10,000 military dead interred, it's the largest American burial site in Europe.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
A dwindling group of elderly Philadelphia veterans wants to build a Battle of the Bulge memorial in Washington Square, a site within the city's Historic Mile they believe is a fitting place to remember the key World War II confrontation. In the process, they are fighting a new battle - against bureaucracy and time. They need money, political will, and permission from local and federal government agencies. "We're the only major city in the country that doesn't have a monument to the Battle of the Bulge," said Norbert McGettigan, 89, who grew up in Overbrook and lives in Woodside Park.
NEWS
December 18, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ray White, a 90-year-old World War II veteran, was left homeless after befriending a con man who systematically scammed him out of his South Philadelphia house, vintage Bentley and Cadillac, and everything else he valued. On Tuesday, 61-year-old Melvin McIlwaine pleaded guilty to cheating White of his worldly possessions, clearing the way for the retiree who served in the Battle of the Bulge to put his life back together. The guilty plea came at "the eleventh hour," just as jury selection was about to begin for McIlwaine's criminal fraud trial, said Assistant District Attorney Deborah Cooper Nixon.
NEWS
November 13, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stanley C. Chojnacki compiled a 21-6 record as a pitcher for the baseball team at what is now Villanova University in the late 1940s. In 1993, that college career earned him induction into the Villanova Varsity Club Hall of Fame. But it was one strikeout against one first baseman, in a 5-1 victory at Yale University on June 8, 1946, that made his career memorable in later years. The first baseman was future President George H.W. Bush, Mr. Chojnacki said in autobiographical notes.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MANY PEOPLE will remember Bucks County Judge Leonard B. Sokolove for his many compassionate rulings, but his son Michael has more tender memories. Like that Little League game when Mike was a kid. "I am 7 years old, maybe 8, playing in what could have been my first Little League game," Michael wrote in a remembrance. "My father is behind me. He's the umpire. I'm hit by a pitch and it hurts. "He does not say, 'Shake it off, son.' He picks me up off the ground, cradles me in his arms, and sprints me down to first base.
NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW EGYPT, N.J. - Maybe he should have gotten a medal for patience. After waiting seven decades, World War II veteran Leonard Brotzky was honored Thursday with a Purple Heart for wounds he received during the Battle of the Bulge. "After 70 years, I'm finally getting it," said Brotzky, 89, of Manchester Township, Ocean County, at a presentation ceremony at the district office of U.S. Rep. Chris Smith (R., N.J.). "I felt I earned it. " The medal should have been awarded in 1944 but was apparently overlooked because of a record-keeping foul-up.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EVERY CHRISTMAS season, an ebullient guy in a sweater was shown in a Pennsylvania Lottery TV commercial throwing open his window and taking in the happy sight in the street below. Snow is falling, carolers singing, everybody looking eager for the coming holiday. And what would be Christmas without a Pennsylvania lottery ticket as a gift? The man called Joe comes out of his house and, acting like Ebenezer Scrooge after his conversion, hurries to Rita's coffee stand and other businesses, handing out the lottery tickets to thrilled recipients.
NEWS
March 15, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
MEDIA His colleagues marvel at Vram S. "Ned" Nedurian's efficiency and expertise. "He handles twice as many cases as any of the other attorneys," said John F.X. Reilly, a deputy Delaware County district attorney. But what is perhaps most remarkable about Nedurian is his age: 90. And on Friday, he was at the center of a closely guarded secret in the Delaware County District Attorney's Office. For weeks, colleagues had been planning his 50th work-anniversary celebration.
NEWS
March 11, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WILLIAM GUARNERE didn't have to go to war. At the time of the Pearl Harbor attack in 1941, he was building tanks at the old Baldwin Locomotive Works, a job considered crucial to the war effort and good for an exemption from military service. But Bill didn't take it. He enlisted in the Army paratroops on Aug. 31, 1942, and the rest is legend. "Wild Bill" Guarnere, the nickname he earned as a fearless combat soldier against the Germans, was a member of the legendary "Band of Brothers" - Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division - celebrated in books and an HBO miniseries in 2001.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not so long ago, repairing a life-threatening bulge in the aorta - the body's largest blood vessel - meant a huge operation. Surgeons would cut open the patient's torso, spread the breastbone, then replace the weakened wall of the aorta with a polyester tube. After a week in the hospital, the patient would need a month or two of convalescence at home. No more. For the majority of patients with aortic aneurysms, the fix is a minimally invasive procedure and one night in the hospital.
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