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Bull Durham

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Some weeks are BIG in the world of home video, and this is one of them: Four major releases lead the video parade - a sexy baseball comedy, a gritty action-drama, the latest installment in the "Dirty Harry" series and a political thriller. BULL DURHAM (1988) (Orion) $89.98. 108 minutes. Susan Sarandon, Kevin Costner, Tim Robbins. Set in the Carolina minors, this comedy is about the romance of curves and curve balls. Sarandon stars as an exalted baseball groupie who gives new meaning to the expression "playing the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1988 | By ALAN CARTER, New York Daily News
She's always playing people slightly off-center. Usually unsettling. Provocative. Wacky even. On the edge. But always sexy. And someone you can't peg. That's why Susan Sarandon is somewhat of a mystery. "Yeah," she said, smiling and mulling over her murky image. "It's like, who is this woman? And really, what color is her hair, anyway?" She is perhaps one of the most underrated actresses in the business. Sarandon dares to be different - taking on roles that keep audiences from figuring out her next move.
SPORTS
September 3, 1993 | by Pete Schnatz, Special to the Daily News
Some will come to say goodbye, to shed a tear, to create a memory . . . and maybe even catch a foul ball. Nostalgic for the way baseball used to be, fans from across the country have flocked to this Tobacco Road town throughout the summer to pay tribute to Durham Athletic Park - one of the oldest minor league ballparks in existence and the location for the movie "Bull Durham. " Tomorrow afternoon, the hometown Bulls will play their final game at the DAP, as it's lovingly referred to by locals, and a standing-room throng will bid a fond farewell to the storied, 55-year-old stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1989 | By Ben Steelman, Special to The Inquirer
In the 1988 season, Susan Sarandon finally hit one out of the park. As Annie Savoy, the off-field trainer and mentor of minor-leaguers in Bull Durham, Sarandon at last had a major-league role, and she swung for the fence, leaving fans' hearts fluttering and probably fulfilling a few fantasies along the way. An instructor in English at Alamance Community College, Annie approached her private life with a pedagogic turn: Convincing a loutish...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Hey there, Kevin! Kevin Costner, Hollywood heartthrob and new-age sage. Is this a good time to talk? Although I hear you're preoccupied with Oliver Stone's JFK, in which you star as 1960s New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, hey, what better moment to discuss your redefinition of the American screen hero? Your faithful fans have learned Costner's first commandment: Thou shalt not play baseball on Astroturf but rather on real grass (see Field of Dreams, Bull Durham). Ditto your second commandment: Thou shalt steal from the corrupt rich and share with the deserving poor (see The Untouchables; Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves)
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | By BOB STRAUSS, Special to the Daily News
Skill, experience and natural talent have their place, of course, but the key to any game is confidence. While Kevin Costner can claim impressive levels of all those qualities, confidence is the one he projects best. Whether it's the tight-lipped determination of Eliot Ness in "The Untouchables," the quick-thinking Tom Farrell staying one step ahead of the Pentagon in "No Way Out," or the young gunfighter from "Silverado" intoxicated with his own goodness, Costner's screen roles always have been portraits of guys who figure out how to have whatever it takes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1989 | By Pat McGilligan and Mark Rowland, Special to The Inquirer
Tortoise beats hare! Aesop would have grinned at the results of this year's poll of 100 U.S. movie critics regarding the best and worst films of 1988. For the methodical crime documentary The Thin Blue Line has edged out the blockbuster hit Who Framed Roger Rabbit as the consensus choice for top honors. Actually, Bull Durham also edged Roger Rabbit (which earned $149.2 million at the turnstiles) in tight top-of-the-line balloting. A World Apart, Rain Man, Wings of Desire and the controversial The Last Temptation of Christ also scored high in the ninth annual survey of newspaper and magazine reviewers.
SPORTS
January 19, 1995 | by Mark Kram, Daily News Sports Writer
In his previous incarnation as a minor-league second baseman in the Baltimore Orioles organization, Ron Shelton saw a movie every day at 1 p.m. Not especially concerned with what the picture was (just as long as the theater was air-conditioned), he passed the endless hours between games under the spell of a broad array of films, unaware as he sat there gazing up at the screen that he would end up writing and directing them himself. "Whatever town I was in, I would go to a movie," said Shelton, clad in a red baseball cap and eating a bowl of soup in a restaurant not far from his central California home.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
They say brevity is the soul of wit. They also say George Bush can play a round of golf in two hours. That means he could play 18 holes in much less time than it takes to sit through "Tin Cup," an innocuous romantic comedy about a broken-down driving-range pro and his nutty therapist (Rene Russo) and a movie that unaccountably runs on for 130 minutes. When "Tin Cup" director Ron Shelton and star Kevin Costner first collaborated on the memorable baseball comedy "Bull Durham," they seemed to understand the benefits of efficiency.
SPORTS
August 21, 1992 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
In another rather lean summer weekend of TV sports viewing, there is one program a bit off the beaten remote-control box that might be worthy of your attention. Tomorrow at 3 p.m. on SportsChannel, "Minor Leagues/Major Dreams" takes a two-hour look at a season in the life of the Visalia Oaks, the Class A California League affiliate of the 1991 world champion Minnesota Twins. The show, which is scheduled to be rebroadcast on Sept. 30 at 10 p.m. and again Oct. 17 at 9:30 p.m., concentrates on six players as well as manager Steve Liddle, who has spent a decade in the farm systems of the California Angels and Minnesota.
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NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Kevin Costner is the general manager of the Cleveland Browns in his new movie, Draft Day . The Ivan Reitman -directed project - a kind of gridiron Moneyball - takes place on that fateful spring day when the 32 teams in the National Football League go hunting for the cream of the year's college crop, signing, trading, strategizing, looking to fill holes in their lineups and, hopefully, find the real talent out there, and the players their...
SPORTS
October 8, 2012 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rather than wait for the ax, Colorado manager Jim Tracy resigned on Sunday, stepping down after his Rockies set a franchise record for losses. The Rockies said a search for Tracy's replacement would begin right away (the snow comes early in those high peaks), but they have no time frame for making a hire. (Translation: Anybody want this job?) Colorado finished last in the NL West this year while going 64-98. The Rockies went 294-308 under Tracy, who was promoted from bench coach in May 2009, the same year he was voted the NL manager of the year after guiding his team into the playoffs.
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
They say brevity is the soul of wit. They also say George Bush can play a round of golf in two hours. That means he could play 18 holes in much less time than it takes to sit through "Tin Cup," an innocuous romantic comedy about a broken-down driving-range pro and his nutty therapist (Rene Russo) and a movie that unaccountably runs on for 130 minutes. When "Tin Cup" director Ron Shelton and star Kevin Costner first collaborated on the memorable baseball comedy "Bull Durham," they seemed to understand the benefits of efficiency.
SPORTS
January 19, 1995 | by Mark Kram, Daily News Sports Writer
In his previous incarnation as a minor-league second baseman in the Baltimore Orioles organization, Ron Shelton saw a movie every day at 1 p.m. Not especially concerned with what the picture was (just as long as the theater was air-conditioned), he passed the endless hours between games under the spell of a broad array of films, unaware as he sat there gazing up at the screen that he would end up writing and directing them himself. "Whatever town I was in, I would go to a movie," said Shelton, clad in a red baseball cap and eating a bowl of soup in a restaurant not far from his central California home.
SPORTS
September 3, 1993 | by Pete Schnatz, Special to the Daily News
Some will come to say goodbye, to shed a tear, to create a memory . . . and maybe even catch a foul ball. Nostalgic for the way baseball used to be, fans from across the country have flocked to this Tobacco Road town throughout the summer to pay tribute to Durham Athletic Park - one of the oldest minor league ballparks in existence and the location for the movie "Bull Durham. " Tomorrow afternoon, the hometown Bulls will play their final game at the DAP, as it's lovingly referred to by locals, and a standing-room throng will bid a fond farewell to the storied, 55-year-old stadium.
SPORTS
August 21, 1992 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
In another rather lean summer weekend of TV sports viewing, there is one program a bit off the beaten remote-control box that might be worthy of your attention. Tomorrow at 3 p.m. on SportsChannel, "Minor Leagues/Major Dreams" takes a two-hour look at a season in the life of the Visalia Oaks, the Class A California League affiliate of the 1991 world champion Minnesota Twins. The show, which is scheduled to be rebroadcast on Sept. 30 at 10 p.m. and again Oct. 17 at 9:30 p.m., concentrates on six players as well as manager Steve Liddle, who has spent a decade in the farm systems of the California Angels and Minnesota.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Hey there, Kevin! Kevin Costner, Hollywood heartthrob and new-age sage. Is this a good time to talk? Although I hear you're preoccupied with Oliver Stone's JFK, in which you star as 1960s New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, hey, what better moment to discuss your redefinition of the American screen hero? Your faithful fans have learned Costner's first commandment: Thou shalt not play baseball on Astroturf but rather on real grass (see Field of Dreams, Bull Durham). Ditto your second commandment: Thou shalt steal from the corrupt rich and share with the deserving poor (see The Untouchables; Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1990 | By Ben Steelman, Special to The Inquirer
"If you give it . . . he will come!" The scene wasn't an Iowa cornfield, but an auditorium at Harvard University. The voice didn't echo from the ghostly beyond, but from a tinny public-address system. Harvard's Hasty Pudding Theatricals Club - male students dressed in their finest thrift-shop dresses and wigs - were heartily roasting Kevin Costner, its 1990 Man of the Year. "What first attracted our eye was the soul-searching in such films as Night Shift and Sizzle Beach U.S.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1989 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
Take me out to the ball game. Or let's stay home for one. That's pretty easy to do these days because there are hundreds of films - theatrical releases, historical or instructional - now on tape. And since the makers of the film "Bull Durham" proved that baseball and the movies could combine to produce a hit, there are sure to be more baseball flicks coming to a theater near you. Just in time for opening week, "Major League," a comedy starring Charlie Sheen, Tom Berenger and Corbin Bernsen, opens tomorrow in Philadelphia-area theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1989 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Some weeks are BIG in the world of home video, and this is one of them: Four major releases lead the video parade - a sexy baseball comedy, a gritty action-drama, the latest installment in the "Dirty Harry" series and a political thriller. BULL DURHAM (1988) (Orion) $89.98. 108 minutes. Susan Sarandon, Kevin Costner, Tim Robbins. Set in the Carolina minors, this comedy is about the romance of curves and curve balls. Sarandon stars as an exalted baseball groupie who gives new meaning to the expression "playing the field.
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