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Bulletin

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BUSINESS
August 19, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
An old familiar name reappeared on some city newsstands yesterday. The Bulletin's logo in its familiar Old English typeface graced the front of the Philadelphia Press and Bulletin, a paper launched by a former Bulletin staffer who says he will publish a weekly, and eventually daily, newspaper, despite his shoestring budget and tiny staff. Raymond Berens, editor and publisher of the paper and the writer of many of its stories, said he has no financiers behind him and is bankrolling the venture himself.
NEWS
May 18, 1993 | by Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer
When we first saw the urgent "PM-TV-CBS-CHUNG" on the Associated Press wire, we thought, Oh, my God. She's announcing her pregnancy. She got the network to release the news for her. Clearly, Connie Chung has had an urgent attitude toward having a baby for years. She and Maury Povich have done shows on it, and detailed the anguish of fertility testing for anyone who had the misfortune to tune in. Why, this month in Good Housekeeping magazine, she confides that she's still trying - at almost 47. Hope does spring eternal.
NEWS
January 29, 2007 | By DON HARRISON
IT WOULD BE the final issue of a newspaper that had been a Philadelphia tradition for almost 135 years. Instead of the usual series of editions all day long, the newspaper would "lift" only once, just to correct or update wherever needed. The day before, I was one of the editors preparing that final edition of the Bulletin. Across the top of Page 1 was what we called a hammer head: Goodby, in big black letters, followed, in somewhat smaller type, by After 134 years, a Philadelphia voice is silent.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
Preservationists who fought to save the former home of The Evening Bulletin were angered yesterday when they learned that the historically certified building at Juniper and Filbert streets had been demolished in 1985 for nothing. "It certainly saddens those of us who were working so hard to save it," said architect and preservationist Gray Smith, after learning the city had dropped its plans to build a criminal justice center complex at the site. Mary Lou McFarland, executive director of the Preservation Coalition of Greater Philadelphia said, "I hate to say that we told you so, but we did. "That, and other buildings on that block, shouldn't have been torn down," McFarland said.
NEWS
September 23, 2004
IWANT TO add my name to the list of people who will vote against President Bush. He has done absolutely nothing but send this country backward in terms of economic stimulus, job creation and worldwide negativity. If this is the ideal leader, then I must be missing something. He did not support the extension of the assault-weapons ban, which is an affront to police officers and their families. Though he's a wartime non-duty respondent, he cast a pall over Sen. Kerry's war record.
NEWS
July 4, 2009 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert E. Lee Taylor Jr., 96, of Bryn Mawr, a former publisher of the Bulletin and a longtime champion of a free press, died Thursday at his home. Born in Norfolk, Va., and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Taylor graduated from Princeton University in 1935, and went to work for his uncle Robert McLean, then publisher of the newspaper. Mr. Taylor worked in circulation and then joined the Navy, where he was captain of a submarine chaser in the Pacific through much of World War II. Returning to the Bulletin, he rose quickly through the ranks on the business side.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1988 | By Janet Mason, Special to The Inquirer
The corner bar, with its promise of camaraderie and the sharing of advice and sob stories, has a new competitor - the personal computer. Can this be true? Can the PC, with its bleary array of accounting programs and beeping high-tech games to play in isolation, really bring people together? You bet. And the price of this high-tech watering hole is often less than the cost of a few beers on a Friday night. Throughout the world, PC enthusiasts - and there are many - have made it their mission to provide computer-age versions of the conversation salon.
NEWS
May 24, 2000 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Francis J. Burke, 84, of Drexel Hill, who worked as a reporter for the Bulletin, International News Service and Yank magazine during World War II, died of kidney failure May 16 at Delaware County Memorial Hospital. Mr. Burke spent 46 years as a journalist, and friends were not surprised by his choice of careers. His father, Stephen, had been the city editor of the Philadelphia Record. After graduating with a bachelor's degree in journalism in 1936 from St. Joseph's College, Mr. Burke joined the Philadelphia office of INS, the news service started by publisher William Randolph Hearst to compete with the Associated Press.
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | By Petria May, Inquirer Staff Writer
Miles Cunningham, 59, who was an award-winning reporter and editor at the Bulletin, Gannett News Service and the Washington Times, died Monday night in his home in Alexandria, Va., after a three-year bout with stomach cancer. At the time of his death, Mr. Cunningham was employed at Insight magazine in Washington. Born in South Dakota, Mr. Cunningham grew up in Arlington, Va., where he graduated from Washington and Lee High School; in 1955, he earned a journalism degree from the University of Tennessee.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
  The Virgin Mary was due to appear on the night of Sept. 20, 1953. Reappear, actually, as she had already appeared to a group of youngsters twice in two days at 52d Street and Parkside Avenue at the edge of Fairmount Park. More than 50,000 came to see the expected miracle. Among them was Henry R. Darling, a young reporter for the Evening Bulletin, who had been on the paper only a few years and had been assigned obituaries, 50th anniversaries, and innocuous features.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 20, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
My father worked nights, slept days, and rose for dinner in a mood as sour as my mother's iced tea. He usually was too tired or cranky to read the just-delivered Bulletin's sports section so my mother, as we ate, often read aloud what for him was its one indispensable element - Sandy Grady's column. Those wonderfully crafted words soothed my father, though they must also have stirred conflicting emotions in a proofreader who had wanted to be a sportswriter. For my young ears, hearing Grady's insights and flawless phrasing, so perfect in audible form, sparked the beginnings of awareness.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sandy Grady, 87, a respected Philadelphia journalist acclaimed for his sportswriting who also covered politics and seven presidents, died Tuesday, April 14, in Reston, Va., after a long battle with kidney cancer. A native of Charlotte, N.C., Mr. Grady arrived in Philadelphia in 1957 to weave tales at the Philadelphia Daily News and then the Bulletin. Frank Bilovsky, a former Bulletin sportswriter, said of Mr. Grady: "He destroyed my 1950s stereotypical view of Southern white men as backward, right-wing bigots.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Loren Robert Craft, 86, of Middletown, Del., a retired newspaper editor, died Sunday April 5, at Christiana Hospital in Delaware. Mr. Craft's family moved around during World War II before settling in Delaware County, and he attended Temple University and Hunter College. His first newspaper job was in the composing room at the Bulletin, where he was taken under the wing of the highly regarded editor Walter Lister. "At one point, he was Lister's personal copyboy," said Sylvia Craft, Mr. Craft's wife.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis X. McNeila, 81, of Somers Point, N.J., a former pressman for the Bulletin and then for The Inquirer, died of metastatic liver cancer on Sunday, Feb. 8, at a daughter's home in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. After he retired, Mr. McNeila was a Eucharistic minister, distributing Communion at St. Joseph Church in Somers Point. "He would also distribute Communion to patients at Shore Medical Center" in Somers Point who couldn't get to Mass, said a daughter, Frances Ryder. "He did genuinely feel it was important that people maintain their faith, even when they were sick," she said.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
TOM TOROK tells the story of how he once escaped bodily injury thanks to Carl Breitinger. It was 1978, and Tom, as a reporter for the Courier-Post, had participated in some articles exposing corruption in Gloucester Township, N.J., stirring the ire of Democratic officials. Along came Carl Breitinger, then a photographer for the Bulletin, arriving at Democratic Party headquarters in all innocence. But he wore a beard, as Tom Torok did, and irate officials thought it was Torok back for more dirt.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOE McGINNISS, who went from controversial stints at the old Evening Bulletin and the Inquirer to best-sellerdom as a writer of blistering books, died yesterday in Worcester, Mass., of prostate cancer at age 71. McGinniss wrote hard-hitting books on many subjects, from Richard Nixon ( The Selling of the President 1968 ) to Sarah Palin ( The Rogue: Searching for the Real Sarah Palin ). The Palin book led him to move in next door to her Alaska home for several months.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE Bulletin closed in 1982, it was a considerable blow to the McBride family. In fact, the family tried to keep it open as best they could. They demonstrated at the building at 30th and Market streets, even holding a candlelight vigil. Nothing worked, of course. The 135-year-old newspaper was doomed. The emotional attachment was a family affair. The late Bill McBride, who died in 1978, was a longtime Bulletin sportswriter, specializing in horse racing, and other family members worked there over the years.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sportswriter Bob Lyons was so organized, so diligent, that he wrote his own obituary and left it for his family to disperse to the media. Mr. Lyons, 73, an understated, dignified man who wrote several books connected to the Philadelphia sports scene, died Wednesday of heart disease. One of Mr. Lyon's five children, Rick, said his father left an obituary "not because he wanted to write it, but because he wanted it accurate. He started his career writing obituaries for the Bulletin, and he ended it writing an obituary.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JACK McBRIDE'S DOOR was always open. Friends, friends of friends, his sons' friends - all were welcome to drop in anytime, check out the refrigerator, have a meal, sleep over if they wanted to. A happy, congenial Irishman, Jack was the kind of guy who always gave of himself, whether it was to his five sons, his cherished grandkids or his many friends. Jack was there with an open door and an open heart. And his grandkids could wrap him around their fingers. They were spoiled rotten by Grandad.
NEWS
March 28, 2013
By Don Harrison Frank Rizzo died in 1991, but he's still making news. Theatre Exile, a South Philadelphia company, recently announced plans to premiere a work about the former mayor by playwright Bruce Graham, hopefully next year. By the time Rizzo became mayor in 1972, he was on a first-name basis with just about everyone in Philadelphia's news business. For years before entering politics, Rizzo had been a cop - a very visible and quotable cop. A good quote (the more outrageous, the better)
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