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Bulletin

NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
THE VIRGIN MARY was due to appear on the night of Sept. 20, 1953.   Reappear, actually, since she had already appeared to a group of youngsters twice over the previous two days at 52nd Street and Parkside Avenue at the edge of Fairmount Park. More than 50,000 people showed up to witness the expected miracle. Among them was Henry R. Darling, a young reporter for the Evening Bulletin, who had been on the paper only a few years and had been assigned mostly to obits, 50th wedding anniversaries and a few innocuous features.
NEWS
February 5, 1992 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
More than 200 former employees of the Bulletin gathered at two locations on Friday night to mark the 10th anniversary of the death of the newspaper. I attended one held at Colleen's Restaurant in the Park Towne Place Apartments. It was not a celebration so much as an acknowledgment that a lot of journalists who felt more like a family than mere colleagues or friends shared a common grief when the paper expired on Jan. 29, 1982. The Bulletin had been published for more than 134 years when it finally closed its doors.
NEWS
March 3, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The National Weather Service yesterday accidentally issued a bulletin that said the city of Rockford had been demolished by a tornado. The erroneous message was sent to hundreds of Midwest radio and television stations and was read on the air by some announcers. Rockford police and the weather service reported receiving several calls from local broadcasters and other members of the media, inquiring about the bulletin. Helen Davis, a police communications supervisor, said the office received 10 to 20 calls.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE Bulletin closed in 1982, it was a considerable blow to the McBride family. In fact, the family tried to keep it open as best they could. They demonstrated at the building at 30th and Market streets, even holding a candlelight vigil. Nothing worked, of course. The 135-year-old newspaper was doomed. The emotional attachment was a family affair. The late Bill McBride, who died in 1978, was a longtime Bulletin sportswriter, specializing in horse racing, and other family members worked there over the years.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1993 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Prodigy, the information and entertainment service for computer users, announced a new pricing plan yesterday as some of its two million customers were participating in a boycott to protest the anticipated changes. In a message posted on one of Prodigy's many electronic bulletin boards, which customers can read in their computers through phone connections, Prodigy's president, Ross Glatzer, said the new rates, to take effect July 1, would increase costs for about one of every five households using the service, or about 20 percent.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1993 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Word of mouth can affect any company - especially one that provides a venue for chat. Consider Prodigy, the IBM-Sears partnership that provides interactive services to more than 2 million computer users nationwide. When its customers got wind that the company was considering a new fee structure, many used the Prodigy system to complain. And faster than you can say "electronic bulletin board," a boycott was born. It's as though a supermarket boycott was incited by a customer standing on a soapbox by the checkout counter.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sportswriter Bob Lyons was so organized, so diligent, that he wrote his own obituary and left it for his family to disperse to the media. Mr. Lyons, 73, an understated, dignified man who wrote several books connected to the Philadelphia sports scene, died Wednesday of heart disease. One of Mr. Lyon's five children, Rick, said his father left an obituary "not because he wanted to write it, but because he wanted it accurate. He started his career writing obituaries for the Bulletin, and he ended it writing an obituary.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1991 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Daniel Pinkwater's collision with what he calls the electronic "ministry of thought" began when he tried to send a note to other authors. Pinkwater sat down at his computer, which dialed up Prodigy - a service that links nearly one million computer users. He typed out a note and dispatched it to one of Prodigy's computer bulletin boards, a sort of electronic party line. But his rather innocuous posting was rejected by the Prodigy monitors who patrol the boards. Pinkwater thinks they misunderstood a word in his message.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By Edward Ohlbaum, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Personal computers have transformed America into one huge electronic community, and everyone who is computer-literate ought to plug into it, says a Yardley author. "The telephone wires are red-hot at night with people communicating through their computers," said Alfred Glossbrenner, a nationally recognized expert on how to buy and use computer hardware and online information services and how to take advantage of free bulletin boards and computer software. Typically, the nation's estimated 2 million personal computer communicators will check in nightly with several of the hundreds of electronic bulletin boards and on-line information services located across the country to ask questions or obtain information of personal interest, Glossbrenner said.
NEWS
August 18, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the early 1950s, the hunt for communists disrupted careers not only in Hollywood and New York City. In Philadelphia, it forced two dozen teachers out of the public school system. Isadore Reivich had taught social studies at West Philadelphia High School for seven years when he was suspended in 1953 and fired in 1954 after an inquiry about "communist activities. " His daughter, Susana Silva, said last week that it took 15 years for Reivich to be reinstated. On Wednesday, Mr. Reivich, 88, died of renal failure at Pennsylvania Hospital.
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