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NEWS
September 24, 1993 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A baker is looking for a Delaware County building zoned for use as a wholesale bakery. A manufacturer is looking for up to 200,000 square feet in Delaware County where it can make durable goods. And a health-care organization is scouting for a Delaware County site for an outpatient clinic. Those are just a few samples of the more than two dozen prospects interested in expanding or relocating in the county, according to the Delaware County Commerce Center's commercial-property bulletin released this week.
NEWS
December 16, 1992 | By PETER BINZEN
Talk about a double whammy. Consider the fate of the big building at 30th and Market Streets. Over the years, it was owned by two of Philadelphia's oldest institutions. First a newspaper, the Bulletin, and then a bank, the Philadelphia Savings Fund Society. Now both the paper and the bank are gone. Only the building still stands as a symbol of tragic failures in the city's business history. It was constructed in 1955 as the Bulletin's sixth home, a four-story office building and two-story publications annex that was described at the time as the world's largest and most modern newspaper plant.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
THE VIRGIN MARY was due to appear on the night of Sept. 20, 1953.   Reappear, actually, since she had already appeared to a group of youngsters twice over the previous two days at 52nd Street and Parkside Avenue at the edge of Fairmount Park. More than 50,000 people showed up to witness the expected miracle. Among them was Henry R. Darling, a young reporter for the Evening Bulletin, who had been on the paper only a few years and had been assigned mostly to obits, 50th wedding anniversaries and a few innocuous features.
NEWS
February 5, 1992 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
More than 200 former employees of the Bulletin gathered at two locations on Friday night to mark the 10th anniversary of the death of the newspaper. I attended one held at Colleen's Restaurant in the Park Towne Place Apartments. It was not a celebration so much as an acknowledgment that a lot of journalists who felt more like a family than mere colleagues or friends shared a common grief when the paper expired on Jan. 29, 1982. The Bulletin had been published for more than 134 years when it finally closed its doors.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHEN THE Festival of Families kicks off tonight on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, one of the main musical acts will be Sister Sledge, who'll be belting out "We Are Family," a fitting anthem for the event. Except that particular "family" may be one member short, thanks to a feud between the Sledges. Kathy Sledge, the youngest member of the quartet, has apparently been ousted from the performance by her siblings Joni, Debbie and Kim, she said last night. "I don't want my fans to think I'm a 'no-show,' " Sledge said last night.
NEWS
January 19, 2016
By Peter Binzen Fifty-one years ago, the Evening Bulletin hired a young black reporter from NBC-TV in Philadelphia for its city staff. The Bulletin had been founded nearly a century earlier, but Claude Lewis was just the second African American reporter to join its newsroom. Lewis started as a general assignment reporter, but, in 1967, George R. Packard, the Bulletin's executive editor, made him a columnist. No Philadelphia daily paper had ever published regular columns by a journalist of color.
NEWS
October 31, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William L. McLean IV, 58, of Charlestown Township, Chester County, a philanthropist and medieval history researcher and reenactor, died Saturday, Oct. 24, of esophageal cancer at home. At the time of his death, Mr. McLean was president and chairman of Independent Publications Inc., a holding company created from the sale of the McLean family's primary newspaper property, the Bulletin, to Charter Co. in April 1980. The paper folded in 1982. Independent Publications is the main financial supporter of the McLean Contributionship, a foundation that gives to projects in the areas of education, the environment, and care of the elderly.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sportswriter Bob Lyons was so organized, so diligent, that he wrote his own obituary and left it for his family to disperse to the media. Mr. Lyons, 73, an understated, dignified man who wrote several books connected to the Philadelphia sports scene, died Wednesday of heart disease. One of Mr. Lyon's five children, Rick, said his father left an obituary "not because he wanted to write it, but because he wanted it accurate. He started his career writing obituaries for the Bulletin, and he ended it writing an obituary.
NEWS
March 3, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The National Weather Service yesterday accidentally issued a bulletin that said the city of Rockford had been demolished by a tornado. The erroneous message was sent to hundreds of Midwest radio and television stations and was read on the air by some announcers. Rockford police and the weather service reported receiving several calls from local broadcasters and other members of the media, inquiring about the bulletin. Helen Davis, a police communications supervisor, said the office received 10 to 20 calls.
NEWS
August 27, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
James Austin, 80, of Sewell, the labor-union leader of an estimated 1,000 pressmen at the Inquirer, the Daily News, and other newspapers in the region from 1994 to 1997, died of complications from sepsis Tuesday, Aug. 23, at his home. "Jim was a very outstanding guy, firm but fair," said Joseph Inemer, president of Local 16-N of the Graphic Communications Conference-International Brotherhood of Teamsters, who succeeded Mr. Austin as the union's chief. Mr. Austin was a pressman at the Bulletin and, after it closed in January 1982, at the Daily News.
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