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NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By Edward Ohlbaum, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Personal computers have transformed America into one huge electronic community, and everyone who is computer-literate ought to plug into it, says a Yardley author. "The telephone wires are red-hot at night with people communicating through their computers," said Alfred Glossbrenner, a nationally recognized expert on how to buy and use computer hardware and online information services and how to take advantage of free bulletin boards and computer software. Typically, the nation's estimated 2 million personal computer communicators will check in nightly with several of the hundreds of electronic bulletin boards and on-line information services located across the country to ask questions or obtain information of personal interest, Glossbrenner said.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
TOM TOROK tells the story of how he once escaped bodily injury thanks to Carl Breitinger. It was 1978, and Tom, as a reporter for the Courier-Post, had participated in some articles exposing corruption in Gloucester Township, N.J., stirring the ire of Democratic officials. Along came Carl Breitinger, then a photographer for the Bulletin, arriving at Democratic Party headquarters in all innocence. But he wore a beard, as Tom Torok did, and irate officials thought it was Torok back for more dirt.
NEWS
August 18, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the early 1950s, the hunt for communists disrupted careers not only in Hollywood and New York City. In Philadelphia, it forced two dozen teachers out of the public school system. Isadore Reivich had taught social studies at West Philadelphia High School for seven years when he was suspended in 1953 and fired in 1954 after an inquiry about "communist activities. " His daughter, Susana Silva, said last week that it took 15 years for Reivich to be reinstated. On Wednesday, Mr. Reivich, 88, died of renal failure at Pennsylvania Hospital.
NEWS
April 29, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gaetano "Tommy" LaFauci, 79, of South Philadelphia, a retired newspaper mailer, union president and city employee, died of heart failure Saturday at home. From 1994 until retiring in 2000, Mr. LaFauci was president and business agent of Mailers Union Local 1414. He had previously held various offices in the union, which represents the workers who prepare newspapers for delivery at area presses including those of The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, and the Camden Courier-Post.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | By Christopher Scanlan, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In an Information Age first, the White House yesterday gave reporters its hefty 1,336-page health-care reform plan on a pair of computer disks weighing less than 2 ounces. "Hey, this is the '90s. We're against killing trees," White House press secretary Dee Dee Myers said. Simultaneously, the White House distributed electronic copies of the plan to a federal computer bulletin board and a computer at the University of North Carolina. That made it instantly available to the estimated 15 million to 20 million people worldwide who tap into the global electronic neighborhood called Internet.
NEWS
March 15, 1986
In a March 1 Letter to the Editor, a writer wrote, "At one time, two pennies bought a newspaper. " These youngsters don't go back far enough. As a boy, I sold evening newspapers for 1 cent each. The Bulletin cost me 1 cent for two, the Telegraph 1 cent for three and the Times 1 cent for 10. (You could only sell the Times when you ran out of the others, which was rare.) People mostly bought the papers for the baseball scores and the comics, and an occasional scare headline, like another war in the Balkans.
NEWS
January 8, 1988 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
Adrian Lee, the Daily News' staunchly conservative editorial page columnist, is taking a leave from the paper to join an ideological soulmate - U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese III. Beginning next Wednesday, and until the end of the Reagan administration in January 1989, Lee said, he will serve as a public-relations assistant to Meese - writing speeches, composing opinion articles that will be offered to newspapers around the country, and briefing...
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE Bulletin closed in 1982, it was a considerable blow to the McBride family. In fact, the family tried to keep it open as best they could. They demonstrated at the building at 30th and Market streets, even holding a candlelight vigil. Nothing worked, of course. The 135-year-old newspaper was doomed. The emotional attachment was a family affair. The late Bill McBride, who died in 1978, was a longtime Bulletin sportswriter, specializing in horse racing, and other family members worked there over the years.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1993 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wally Harris calls Prodigy his "electronic Cheers," after the fictional Boston bar. "You can go to the electronic Cheers and meet people of like interests," said Harris, a Norristown electrical contractor. "You can discuss politics, business, home and child care and education. I, myself, hang out with a group of electricians. " Using their computers, phone hookups and the Prodigy on-line service, Harris and his buddies all over the country chat about electrical construction codes and the latest technology.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JACK McBRIDE'S DOOR was always open. Friends, friends of friends, his sons' friends - all were welcome to drop in anytime, check out the refrigerator, have a meal, sleep over if they wanted to. A happy, congenial Irishman, Jack was the kind of guy who always gave of himself, whether it was to his five sons, his cherished grandkids or his many friends. Jack was there with an open door and an open heart. And his grandkids could wrap him around their fingers. They were spoiled rotten by Grandad.
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