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Bulletin

NEWS
March 15, 1986
In a March 1 Letter to the Editor, a writer wrote, "At one time, two pennies bought a newspaper. " These youngsters don't go back far enough. As a boy, I sold evening newspapers for 1 cent each. The Bulletin cost me 1 cent for two, the Telegraph 1 cent for three and the Times 1 cent for 10. (You could only sell the Times when you ran out of the others, which was rare.) People mostly bought the papers for the baseball scores and the comics, and an occasional scare headline, like another war in the Balkans.
NEWS
January 8, 1988 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
Adrian Lee, the Daily News' staunchly conservative editorial page columnist, is taking a leave from the paper to join an ideological soulmate - U.S. Attorney General Edwin Meese III. Beginning next Wednesday, and until the end of the Reagan administration in January 1989, Lee said, he will serve as a public-relations assistant to Meese - writing speeches, composing opinion articles that will be offered to newspapers around the country, and briefing...
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE Bulletin closed in 1982, it was a considerable blow to the McBride family. In fact, the family tried to keep it open as best they could. They demonstrated at the building at 30th and Market streets, even holding a candlelight vigil. Nothing worked, of course. The 135-year-old newspaper was doomed. The emotional attachment was a family affair. The late Bill McBride, who died in 1978, was a longtime Bulletin sportswriter, specializing in horse racing, and other family members worked there over the years.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1993 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wally Harris calls Prodigy his "electronic Cheers," after the fictional Boston bar. "You can go to the electronic Cheers and meet people of like interests," said Harris, a Norristown electrical contractor. "You can discuss politics, business, home and child care and education. I, myself, hang out with a group of electricians. " Using their computers, phone hookups and the Prodigy on-line service, Harris and his buddies all over the country chat about electrical construction codes and the latest technology.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JACK McBRIDE'S DOOR was always open. Friends, friends of friends, his sons' friends - all were welcome to drop in anytime, check out the refrigerator, have a meal, sleep over if they wanted to. A happy, congenial Irishman, Jack was the kind of guy who always gave of himself, whether it was to his five sons, his cherished grandkids or his many friends. Jack was there with an open door and an open heart. And his grandkids could wrap him around their fingers. They were spoiled rotten by Grandad.
NEWS
January 21, 1991 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
"If you think this is about oil," Paul Van Randwyk told Nicole Gittleman in no uncertain terms Wednesday night after news that the war had begun, "you're as wrong as if colonists in Revolutionary War times thought that war was for tea. " Never mind that Van Randwyk did not know Gittleman, and probably never will, though both of them live in Michigan. Never mind that they were not arguing in person or even by phone. Van Randwyk was giving Gittleman a piece of his mind electronically - via computer - responding to her note on an electronic bulletin board.
NEWS
July 19, 1997
A billboard across from 30th Street Station used to proclaim: "Welcome to Philadelphia and Gimbels. " Philadelphia is still here, but Gimbels isn't. And neither are Wanamaker's and all the other old department stores. Years ago, a young man out of high school called home and said he'd just gotten a job at the Bulletin. "Wonderful," rejoiced his mother. "You'll always have a job. " He isn't working for the Bulletin anymore. It's been 15 years since the Bulletin landed on your doorstep.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | BY HARRY RYAN
I remember when there were nine daily newspapers in New York City? Many Philadelphians have never forgotten the deceased Bulletin's slogan: In Philadelphia, Nearly Everybody Reads The Bulletin. Newspapers are dying. In this contemporary era, television has been the grotesque murderer of newspapers and magazines. Today, pay-for-TV-cable has been an ugly motive for not reading newspapers. Newspapers are in my blood. I read newspapers voraciously. In the past golden age of newspapers, it was cranky typewriters, inexpensive copy paper, rewritemen receiving stories from reporters over old-time telephones.
NEWS
October 8, 1997 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eugene S. Harris, 69, former reporter and editor who wrote hard-hitting police and investigative politics stories and occasional off-beat feature articles, died yesterday at Abington Memorial Hospital after an eight-year battle with cancer. He lived in Jenkintown. Mr. Harris worked for three of the city's largest daily newspapers - The Inquirer, Daily News and the former Bulletin - from the 1960s to the 1980s. He also worked for United Press International wire service. "Gene was a great guy and a very good writer," said Harry Belinger, his former city editor at the Daily News and Inquirer.
NEWS
April 14, 1997 | By Zachary Stalberg
A long profile of a local figure ran recently in the Daily News. Included in the story was an unflattering remark about the individual made by a critic who was not identified. This being Philadelphia, the subject immediately phoned the person he believed to be his attacker, who tried to weasel out. "The paper misquoted me," he said. "Try another line," responded the accuser. "Joe Daughen wrote that story. " Daughen and I worked back-to-back in the City Hall pressroom - Joe for the Bulletin and I for the News.
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