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Bulletin

NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a journalist, Herb Drill always looked ahead. He made sure he would be remembered - by writing his own obituary, packed with details of his life. Herbert Alan Drill, 71, formerly of Richboro, Bucks County, a freelance journalist and a former reporter for The Inquirer, died of complications from a genetic disease Monday, Feb. 25, at his home in Jacksonville, Fla. He had been ill for several years, his family said. Mr. Drill worked for The Inquirer beginning in 1989, covering suburban business, police, and municipal government, and writing obituaries.
NEWS
October 29, 2012
DEAR ABBY : The other day at my in-laws', my mother-in-law, father-in-law, "Bert," and I were in their computer room. Bert has pictures of his family posted on his bulletin board. One of the photos he posted recently I found disturbing. It was of a young, well-endowed woman in her early 20s wearing a tight tube top. What disturbed me was that Bert has printed my 16-year-old daughter's name underneath and the date "2017. " When I asked him about it, he said that was what she will look like at 21. I think it's unnerving for a grandfather to be picturing his only granddaughter in such a manner.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | Associated Press
COLUMBIA, Pa. - The proprietor of a restaurant in south-central Pennsylvania who made national headlines when her Sunday discount for anyone showing a church bulletin was challenged by a member of an atheist group says the controversy hasn't hurt business. In fact, Sharon Prudhomme says business is up at Prudhomme's Lost Cajun Kitchen in Columbia, Lancaster County, because of the publicity. She said she had received thousands of supportive e-mails, as well as phone calls and social-media postings.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
  The Virgin Mary was due to appear on the night of Sept. 20, 1953. Reappear, actually, as she had already appeared to a group of youngsters twice in two days at 52d Street and Parkside Avenue at the edge of Fairmount Park. More than 50,000 came to see the expected miracle. Among them was Henry R. Darling, a young reporter for the Evening Bulletin, who had been on the paper only a few years and had been assigned obituaries, 50th anniversaries, and innocuous features.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
THE VIRGIN MARY was due to appear on the night of Sept. 20, 1953.   Reappear, actually, since she had already appeared to a group of youngsters twice over the previous two days at 52nd Street and Parkside Avenue at the edge of Fairmount Park. More than 50,000 people showed up to witness the expected miracle. Among them was Henry R. Darling, a young reporter for the Evening Bulletin, who had been on the paper only a few years and had been assigned mostly to obits, 50th wedding anniversaries and a few innocuous features.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
THERE WAS the Norristown welder who was adept at sneaking up on skunks, grabbing them by the tail and throwing them over a fence before they could react. There was the female recluse in Wayne who, when she died, left behind 400 bags filled with trash, including three boxes of string, one of which was carefully labeled: "String too short to use. " These were two of the characters whose stories emerged from the typewriter of Joseph P. Barrett during the more than 27 years he worked for the old Philadelphia Bulletin as a police reporter and feature writer.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a graphic designer, Mike Dew is inspired by what he sees - especially while tooling around on the Internet. "I come across things that I want to cook, or stuff for my apartment, or things for work like type, design, architecture. " Now, it all gets tacked on his Pinterest page. Get ready to embrace the newest social media darling - because along with your Facebook wall, Twitter handle, and LinkedIn profile, now you must have a Pinterest page. That is, if you are the creative, visual type.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
T. Bayard Brunt Jr., 95, the Bulletin rewrite man whose 1981 class-action lawsuit prevented the last owner of the newspaper from using some of its employees' pension funds for its own purposes, died Tuesday, Feb. 28, at Samaritan Hospice in Marlton. On Sept. 14, 1983, U.S. District Judge John B. Hannum approved a $1.2 million settlement for 1,500 former Bulletin employees who had sued to recapture up to $2 million in overfinancing of their pension plan. The result of the suit was a windfall, making reporters, photographers, editors, and others eligible for payments ranging from $200 to $4,300, depending on seniority, The Inquirer reported at the time.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By WALTER F. NAEDELE, Inquirer Staff Writer
T. BAYARD Brunt Jr., 95, the Philadelphia Bulletin rewrite man whose 1981 class-action lawsuit prevented the last owner of the newspaper from using some of its employees' pension funds for its own purposes, died Tuesday at Samaritan Hospice, in Marlton N.J. On Sept. 14, 1983, U.S. District Judge John B. Hannum approved a $1.2 million settlement for 1,500 former Bulletin employees who had sued to recapture up to $2 million in overfinancing of their pension plan. The Bulletin closed in January 1982.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
HARRY TOLAND was a most unlikely labor reporter. Chestnut Hill born and bred, Episcopal Academy, Yale University English major. But when Stanley Thompson, the Evening Bulletin 's city editor, broached the idea to him on, oddly enough, Groundhog Day in 1952, Harry mumbled an uncertain yes. Tall and gangly, impeccably mannered and gracious, Harry was no Vic Riesel, the labor activist and columnist. Nobody was going to throw acid in his face. Besides, this was Philadelphia.
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