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NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
THE VIRGIN MARY was due to appear on the night of Sept. 20, 1953.   Reappear, actually, since she had already appeared to a group of youngsters twice over the previous two days at 52nd Street and Parkside Avenue at the edge of Fairmount Park. More than 50,000 people showed up to witness the expected miracle. Among them was Henry R. Darling, a young reporter for the Evening Bulletin, who had been on the paper only a few years and had been assigned mostly to obits, 50th wedding anniversaries and a few innocuous features.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
THERE WAS the Norristown welder who was adept at sneaking up on skunks, grabbing them by the tail and throwing them over a fence before they could react. There was the female recluse in Wayne who, when she died, left behind 400 bags filled with trash, including three boxes of string, one of which was carefully labeled: "String too short to use. " These were two of the characters whose stories emerged from the typewriter of Joseph P. Barrett during the more than 27 years he worked for the old Philadelphia Bulletin as a police reporter and feature writer.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a graphic designer, Mike Dew is inspired by what he sees - especially while tooling around on the Internet. "I come across things that I want to cook, or stuff for my apartment, or things for work like type, design, architecture. " Now, it all gets tacked on his Pinterest page. Get ready to embrace the newest social media darling - because along with your Facebook wall, Twitter handle, and LinkedIn profile, now you must have a Pinterest page. That is, if you are the creative, visual type.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
T. Bayard Brunt Jr., 95, the Bulletin rewrite man whose 1981 class-action lawsuit prevented the last owner of the newspaper from using some of its employees' pension funds for its own purposes, died Tuesday, Feb. 28, at Samaritan Hospice in Marlton. On Sept. 14, 1983, U.S. District Judge John B. Hannum approved a $1.2 million settlement for 1,500 former Bulletin employees who had sued to recapture up to $2 million in overfinancing of their pension plan. The result of the suit was a windfall, making reporters, photographers, editors, and others eligible for payments ranging from $200 to $4,300, depending on seniority, The Inquirer reported at the time.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By WALTER F. NAEDELE, Inquirer Staff Writer
T. BAYARD Brunt Jr., 95, the Philadelphia Bulletin rewrite man whose 1981 class-action lawsuit prevented the last owner of the newspaper from using some of its employees' pension funds for its own purposes, died Tuesday at Samaritan Hospice, in Marlton N.J. On Sept. 14, 1983, U.S. District Judge John B. Hannum approved a $1.2 million settlement for 1,500 former Bulletin employees who had sued to recapture up to $2 million in overfinancing of their pension plan. The Bulletin closed in January 1982.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
HARRY TOLAND was a most unlikely labor reporter. Chestnut Hill born and bred, Episcopal Academy, Yale University English major. But when Stanley Thompson, the Evening Bulletin 's city editor, broached the idea to him on, oddly enough, Groundhog Day in 1952, Harry mumbled an uncertain yes. Tall and gangly, impeccably mannered and gracious, Harry was no Vic Riesel, the labor activist and columnist. Nobody was going to throw acid in his face. Besides, this was Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the late 1960s, Nessa Forman would show up at 7 a.m. in the composing room of the Evening Bulletin, the only woman there. As the first-edition deadline neared, she directed the men who moved columns of metal type into the forms that produced that day's feature pages. Though not long out of graduate school, Ms. Forman was already respected. On Saturday night, Ms. Forman, 68, vice president of corporate communications and public affairs at WHYY Inc. from February 1983 to July 2007 and arts and leisure editor of the Bulletin when it closed in January 1982, died of pancreatic cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse.
NEWS
August 31, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
IT WAS no longer true that nearly everyone read the Bulletin. The famous slogan - for many years displayed in New Yorker cartoons and elsewhere - gave way to two major forces: the ascendancy of the competition and the arrival of TV news. "To this day, I feel we really did a fine job, and gave the public a straight story," former publisher and editor William L. McLean III said in an interview when the Bulletin closed in January 1982. "That's the greatest source of satisfaction I have.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William L. McLean III, 83, of Wynnewood, the last of his family to run the Bulletin before it was sold in April 1980 and closed in January 1982, died of kidney failure Saturday, Aug. 27, at Lankenau Hospital. Mr. McLean was editor and publisher of the newspaper from 1975 to 1980. His grandfather, William L. McLean, bought the Evening Bulletin in 1895, when it was the smallest of the city's 13 newspapers. By the 1950s, it was the largest-circulation afternoon newspaper in the nation.
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