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Bulletin

NEWS
August 2, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael B. Coakley III, 69, of Blackwood, a throwback to the nights of competitive newspaper journalism at the Evening Bulletin and later at The Inquirer, died of complications of Alzheimer's disease Tuesday, July 26, at his home. If any night reporters, phoning in stories to the city desk, uttered that old cliché, "Hello, sweetie, gimme rewrite," they often got Mike Coakley. And what they got in the 1970s and 1980s was an echo of an even earlier time, before college graduates became the norm instead of high school-educated reporters.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrea Mitchell, now chief foreign-affairs correspondent for NBC News, walked into the Philadelphia City Hall newsroom in the 1960s on the first day of her first job as a reporter for KYW-AM. The only woman in the room. A minnow among barracudas. Except for Philadelphia Daily News reporter Bill Fidati. "He reached out and mentored me," Mitchell said in a Wednesday phone interview. "He really made it acceptable for many of the other veteran male reporters to accept a young, eager, but inexperienced woman.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adrian I. Lee, 90, a longtime reporter and columnist for the Bulletin, died of a respiratory infection Wednesday, June 15, at Cathedral Village, a retirement community in Roxborough. Mr. Lee joined the Evening Bulletin in 1948 as a general assignment and police reporter. He later was a rewrite man, a national reporter, and an editorial writer, and was a conservative columnist when the paper closed in 1982. In 1998, Mr. Lee contributed an essay for a collection of reminiscences about the Bulletin, titled "I Loved Every Minute.
NEWS
December 23, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
ART GEISELMAN reflected the anger and despair felt by the staff of the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin that grim day in January 1982, when it was announced that the 134-year-old newspaper would close. "Goddamn it, we had a good staff," he said. "We beat the Inquirer all the time, right up to the end. Our stories did more than any other newspaper's to effect social change in this town. " And one of the outstanding members of that damn good staff was Art Geiselman, a prizewinning newsman known for his aggressive reporting and the precision of his writing.
NEWS
September 18, 2010 | By Joelle Farrell and John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writers
One bulletin from Harrisburg warned that a protest over use of carriage horses in Philadelphia could turn into "a fertile recruiting or meeting ground" for militant animal-rights activists. Another said convicted police killer Mumia Abu-Jamal's supporters might turn desperate and "attack perceived enemies" after a prosecutor vowed to seek his execution. And Halloween might bring "rowdy behavior" from eco-activists in masks and costumes at a lunchtime rally outside the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Philadelphia office.
NEWS
September 15, 2010 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG ? Gov. Rendell said Tuesday that he was "appalled" and "embarrassed" that his administration's Office of Homeland Security has been tracking and circulating information about legitimate protests by activist groups that do not pose a threat to public safety. Rendell said he did not know that the state Office of Homeland Security had been paying an outside company to track a long list of activists, including groups that oppose drilling in the Marcellus Shale, animal-rights advocates, and peace activists.
NEWS
September 14, 2010 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG ? Gov. Rendell said Tuesday that he was "appalled" and "embarrassed" that his administration's Office of Homeland Security has been tracking and circulating information about legitimate protests by activist groups that do not pose a threat to public safety. Rendell said he did not know that the state Office of Homeland Security had been paying an outside company to track a long list of activists, including groups that oppose drilling in the Marcellus Shale, animal-rights advocates, and peace activists.
FOOD
May 13, 2010
Reader: Hey Craig, I had a fantastic brunch experience at Amis this weekend, some of the dishes are an amazing combination of brunch concepts with the Italian touch Vetri is known for, the taste of the duck egg with pecorino fondue and pork lined my mouth all weekend. CL: You are the second person THIS MORNING to rave about last weekend's brunch at Amis. Those guys can really cook, and it's nice to know they're doing a brunch that is still true to the character of their dinner menu.
NEWS
February 15, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Albert Spendlove, 94, business manager and vice president of the Evening Bulletin from 1956 to 1975, died of heart failure Feb. 1 at Aria Health-Frankford Campus. He had lived at Wood River Village, a retirement community in Bensalem, since 1988. In 1966, Mr. Spendlove was among four representatives of the American Newspaper Publishers Association on a newspaper exchange visit to the Soviet Union. His daughter, Katherine Sall?, said that he visited newspapers in Moscow, Leningrad, and the Black Sea resort of Sochi.
NEWS
February 8, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hugh B. Brown, 93, a former Philadelphia newspaper advertising representative, died of heart failure Jan. 22 at the Artman Lutheran Home in Ambler, where he had lived for the last 10 years. Mr. Brown's daughter, Laurie, said that from 1955 until he retired in 1981, Mr. Brown was on the national advertising staff at the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin. Besides selling ads "for air and steamship travel," she said, he was also a financial sales representative. Mr. Brown grew up in the rectory of All Saints' Episcopal Church in Torresdale, where his father, Percy, was the rector.
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