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NEWS
September 14, 2010 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG ? Gov. Rendell said Tuesday that he was "appalled" and "embarrassed" that his administration's Office of Homeland Security has been tracking and circulating information about legitimate protests by activist groups that do not pose a threat to public safety. Rendell said he did not know that the state Office of Homeland Security had been paying an outside company to track a long list of activists, including groups that oppose drilling in the Marcellus Shale, animal-rights advocates, and peace activists.
FOOD
May 13, 2010
Reader: Hey Craig, I had a fantastic brunch experience at Amis this weekend, some of the dishes are an amazing combination of brunch concepts with the Italian touch Vetri is known for, the taste of the duck egg with pecorino fondue and pork lined my mouth all weekend. CL: You are the second person THIS MORNING to rave about last weekend's brunch at Amis. Those guys can really cook, and it's nice to know they're doing a brunch that is still true to the character of their dinner menu.
NEWS
February 15, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Albert Spendlove, 94, business manager and vice president of the Evening Bulletin from 1956 to 1975, died of heart failure Feb. 1 at Aria Health-Frankford Campus. He had lived at Wood River Village, a retirement community in Bensalem, since 1988. In 1966, Mr. Spendlove was among four representatives of the American Newspaper Publishers Association on a newspaper exchange visit to the Soviet Union. His daughter, Katherine Sall?, said that he visited newspapers in Moscow, Leningrad, and the Black Sea resort of Sochi.
NEWS
February 8, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hugh B. Brown, 93, a former Philadelphia newspaper advertising representative, died of heart failure Jan. 22 at the Artman Lutheran Home in Ambler, where he had lived for the last 10 years. Mr. Brown's daughter, Laurie, said that from 1955 until he retired in 1981, Mr. Brown was on the national advertising staff at the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin. Besides selling ads "for air and steamship travel," she said, he was also a financial sales representative. Mr. Brown grew up in the rectory of All Saints' Episcopal Church in Torresdale, where his father, Percy, was the rector.
NEWS
January 9, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William P. Naulty Sr., 73, of Cinnaminson, a former newspaper reporter and legislative aide, died from complications of an infection Thursday at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. For more than 20 years, Mr. Naulty assisted Republican Assembly members and senators in New Jersey's Eighth Legislative District. He loved casinos and horse racing, said his son, William Jr., and was especially helpful to State Sen. Martha Bark in her efforts to support horse racing and breeding in New Jersey.
NEWS
July 4, 2009 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert E. Lee Taylor Jr., 96, of Bryn Mawr, a former publisher of the Bulletin and a longtime champion of a free press, died Thursday at his home. Born in Norfolk, Va., and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Taylor graduated from Princeton University in 1935, and went to work for his uncle Robert McLean, then publisher of the newspaper. Mr. Taylor worked in circulation and then joined the Navy, where he was captain of a submarine chaser in the Pacific through much of World War II. Returning to the Bulletin, he rose quickly through the ranks on the business side.
NEWS
June 2, 2009 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Bulletin, a Philadelphia daily newspaper that developed a loyal following as a strident conservative voice in the region, folded yesterday, employees confirmed. Around 4:15 p.m., about 25 employees were called together at the newspaper's office at 1500 Walnut St. They were told by publisher Thomas G. Rice that the paper could no longer afford to operate, employees said. Yesterday's issue was the last. In an e-mail last night, Rice said he did not want to comment. Meredith Cunningham, 24, who laid out sports pages, said the staff had not been paid on time for several months.
NEWS
May 31, 2009 | BY MELISSA DRIBBEN INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One morning in the fall of 1972, Gene Roberts shambled up to the twin revolving doors at 400 N. Broad St. to begin his first day as executive editor of The Inquirer. As he pushed through one door, the photo editor - who had just quit - was walking out the other. " 'You've just made the dumbest mistake of your life,' " Roberts recalls him saying. " 'Welcome to The Inquirer!' " With that, Roberts - more certain than ever that he had come to the right place at the right time - took the elevator to the fifth floor and began what would become a legendary 18-year reign.
NEWS
May 31, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
One morning in the fall of 1972, Gene Roberts shambled up to the twin revolving doors at 400 N. Broad St. to begin his first day as executive editor of The Inquirer. As he pushed through one door, the photo editor - who had just quit - was walking out the other. " 'You've just made the dumbest mistake of your life,' " Roberts recalls him saying. " 'Welcome to The Inquirer!' " With that, Roberts - more certain than ever that he had come to the right place at the right time - took the elevator to the fifth floor and began what would become a legendary 18-year reign.
NEWS
August 18, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the early 1950s, the hunt for communists disrupted careers not only in Hollywood and New York City. In Philadelphia, it forced two dozen teachers out of the public school system. Isadore Reivich had taught social studies at West Philadelphia High School for seven years when he was suspended in 1953 and fired in 1954 after an inquiry about "communist activities. " His daughter, Susana Silva, said last week that it took 15 years for Reivich to be reinstated. On Wednesday, Mr. Reivich, 88, died of renal failure at Pennsylvania Hospital.
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