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Bulletin

NEWS
July 4, 2009 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert E. Lee Taylor Jr., 96, of Bryn Mawr, a former publisher of the Bulletin and a longtime champion of a free press, died Thursday at his home. Born in Norfolk, Va., and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Taylor graduated from Princeton University in 1935, and went to work for his uncle Robert McLean, then publisher of the newspaper. Mr. Taylor worked in circulation and then joined the Navy, where he was captain of a submarine chaser in the Pacific through much of World War II. Returning to the Bulletin, he rose quickly through the ranks on the business side.
NEWS
June 2, 2009 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Bulletin, a Philadelphia daily newspaper that developed a loyal following as a strident conservative voice in the region, folded yesterday, employees confirmed. Around 4:15 p.m., about 25 employees were called together at the newspaper's office at 1500 Walnut St. They were told by publisher Thomas G. Rice that the paper could no longer afford to operate, employees said. Yesterday's issue was the last. In an e-mail last night, Rice said he did not want to comment. Meredith Cunningham, 24, who laid out sports pages, said the staff had not been paid on time for several months.
NEWS
May 31, 2009 | BY MELISSA DRIBBEN INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One morning in the fall of 1972, Gene Roberts shambled up to the twin revolving doors at 400 N. Broad St. to begin his first day as executive editor of The Inquirer. As he pushed through one door, the photo editor - who had just quit - was walking out the other. " 'You've just made the dumbest mistake of your life,' " Roberts recalls him saying. " 'Welcome to The Inquirer!' " With that, Roberts - more certain than ever that he had come to the right place at the right time - took the elevator to the fifth floor and began what would become a legendary 18-year reign.
NEWS
May 31, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
One morning in the fall of 1972, Gene Roberts shambled up to the twin revolving doors at 400 N. Broad St. to begin his first day as executive editor of The Inquirer. As he pushed through one door, the photo editor - who had just quit - was walking out the other. " 'You've just made the dumbest mistake of your life,' " Roberts recalls him saying. " 'Welcome to The Inquirer!' " With that, Roberts - more certain than ever that he had come to the right place at the right time - took the elevator to the fifth floor and began what would become a legendary 18-year reign.
NEWS
August 18, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the early 1950s, the hunt for communists disrupted careers not only in Hollywood and New York City. In Philadelphia, it forced two dozen teachers out of the public school system. Isadore Reivich had taught social studies at West Philadelphia High School for seven years when he was suspended in 1953 and fired in 1954 after an inquiry about "communist activities. " His daughter, Susana Silva, said last week that it took 15 years for Reivich to be reinstated. On Wednesday, Mr. Reivich, 88, died of renal failure at Pennsylvania Hospital.
NEWS
April 29, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gaetano "Tommy" LaFauci, 79, of South Philadelphia, a retired newspaper mailer, union president and city employee, died of heart failure Saturday at home. From 1994 until retiring in 2000, Mr. LaFauci was president and business agent of Mailers Union Local 1414. He had previously held various offices in the union, which represents the workers who prepare newspapers for delivery at area presses including those of The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, and the Camden Courier-Post.
NEWS
January 30, 2007 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Philadelphia Bulletin went out of business on Jan. 29, 1982, publisher N.S. "Buddy" Hayden memorably remarked, "Dinosaurs don't live here anymore. " By that, he meant afternoon newspapers - not the 1,743 employees who went down with the ship. T-Rex and triceratops were nowhere in sight yesterday when 40 still-very-extant veterans of the old Bulletin newsroom gathered over lunch to reminisce about a day when the nation's fourth-largest city (it was, then) had four brawling major dailies - only two of which were destined to survive.
NEWS
January 29, 2007 | By DON HARRISON
IT WOULD BE the final issue of a newspaper that had been a Philadelphia tradition for almost 135 years. Instead of the usual series of editions all day long, the newspaper would "lift" only once, just to correct or update wherever needed. The day before, I was one of the editors preparing that final edition of the Bulletin. Across the top of Page 1 was what we called a hammer head: Goodby, in big black letters, followed, in somewhat smaller type, by After 134 years, a Philadelphia voice is silent.
NEWS
May 18, 2006 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
May 14, 2006 DEAR WILSON: Congratulations on receiving your First Holy Communion today. It brought a tear to my eye to stand with you as you accepted the sacrament, and it was obvious to your mother and me that you have taken your religious education very seriously. I saved a copy of the church bulletin distributed at Mass today as a keepsake, and I'm writing this letter in the hope that you'll keep it attached to the bulletin as an explanation. You see, my name appears in an insert to the bulletin distributed throughout the archdiocese on the day you received communion, and not in a favorable light.
SPORTS
March 24, 2005 | By TED SILARY silaryt@phillynews.com Daily News sports writers Ed Barkowitz, Phil Jasner and Kevin Mulligan contributed to this report
TO LISTEN TO Bob Vetrone, even for just a minute, was to have your spirits instantly lifted. To listen to him for a lengthy period was to know your face would hurt from smiling and laughing so much, and that you would desperately try to remember his one-liners and stories so you could pass them on to someone else. Vetrone performed high-quality work for newspapers and in television and radio, as well as for pro and college teams. He also worked the room like nobody's business.
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