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Bullets

TRAVEL
August 20, 2012 | By Huntly Collins, For The Inquirer
BEIJING - With its sparkling domed skylight, polished granite floor tiles, grand piano, and string of retail outlets such as Timberland and Nautica, the Beijing South Railway Station could compete with the world's finest for modernity and cleanliness. It was here in December that we boarded China's new high-speed bullet train that whisked us off to Shanghai, more than 800 miles to the south, in just five hours. For efficiency and comfort at a relatively low price ($185 round-trip for second-class seats that were nicer than those on Amtrak's Acela)
NEWS
August 11, 2012 | By Dinesh Ramde, Associated Press
OAK CREEK, Wis. - They removed the bloodstained carpeting, repaired shattered windows, and painted over gunfire-scarred walls. But Sikh Temple of Wisconsin members left a single bullet hole to mark the memory of a white supremacist's deadly rampage. As thousands Friday mourned the six victims gunned down before a prayer service, the temple's members worked late the previous night to remove all but the one trace of the shooting. The waist-high bullet hole in a door jamb near the main prayer room was left as a memorial to the slain worshipers.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
When John Adams traveled between Boston and Philadelphia in 1776, it took him two weeks. On Amtrak's Acela today, the trip is about five hours. But sometimes, the train seems as frustratingly slow as Adams' horse. Poking through North Philadelphia, lumbering out of New York City, wallowing through Bridgeport, America's high-speed rail is anything but. Compared with its cousins in Europe and Asia, Amtrak's showcase service is heavy and slow, less a bullet train than a cannonball on wheels.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
A minor player in what authorities allege was a multi-million-dollar scam orchestrated by mobster Nicky Scarfo Jr. and his top associate, Salvatore Pelullo, pleaded guilty to a weapons charge Wednesday during a brief hearing in federal court in Camden. Apparently it was a discussion about some "size 9 shoes" that did him in. Todd Stark, 43, of Ocean City, N.J., who served as Pelullo's driver, admitted purchasing two boxes of 9mm bullets for Scarfo in December 2007. As a convicted felon, Scarfo, 46, is prohibited from possessing a gun or ammunition.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2012 | Dan Gross
Country starLeAnn Rimes joined her road crew for target practice at the Philadelphia Archery & Gun Club (9th & Ellsworth) Thursday afternoon. Rimes, who played the Keswick Theatre Friday, fired a semi-automatic pistol and a semi-automatic rifle down the range, and spent time chatting up and taking pictures with gun-shop employees. The singer, accompanied by her actor-husband Eddie Cibrian, tweeted photos of herself shooting and said she had a wonderful time. Backstage at her Keswick show Friday, Rimes, in accordance with the Wish Upon A Hero organization, presented a wheelchair to Southampton's Renee Succa who has Rett Syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disease.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | By Terry Wallace, Associated Press
DALLAS - An Army nurse showed no alarm or discomfort before suddenly collapsing during a Skype video chat with his wife, who saw a bullet hole in a closet behind him, his family said Sunday. Capt. Bruce Kevin Clark's family released a statement describing what his wife saw in the video feed recording her husband's death. "Clark was suddenly knocked forward," the statement said. "The closet behind him had a bullet hole in it. The other individuals, including a member of the military, who rushed to the home of CPT Clark's wife also saw the hole and agreed it was a bullet hole.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
William Lawlis Pace, 103, who held the Guinness World Record for living the longest with a bullet in his head, died in his sleep Monday at a Turlock, Calif., nursing home. His death came 94 years and six months after his older brother accidentally shot him with their father's .22-caliber rifle in 1917. Mr. Pace learned in 2006 that he had been crowned the world record-holder in the category of unwanted cranial ammunition. His son told a newspaper during a birthday party for his father last year that doctors in Mr. Pace's native Texas left the bullet in place because they worried that surgery might cause brain damage.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer
P OLL WORKERS in Chester worry that the state's new voter-ID bill could suppress turnout. You know what else suppresses turnout? Gunshots. More than a dozen shots rang out Tuesday morning near a polling place on Johnson Street in Sun Village, a watch-your-back neighborhood in Chester's East Side. "We have a lot of people who walk here to vote. We want to protect them, but how can we?" asked Ashaki-Imani Prince, a judge of elections. "They'll be afraid they might be shot. " The voting booths are inside a garage that already has a couple of bullet holes in it - including one that went through the front door into the back wall - from a previous shooting.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In January 1957, Dr. John B. Flick Jr. cut out of the heart of a 9-year-old girl a bullet that had been lodged there for 17 days. "Doctors said every time her heart beat, the bullet pushed against the wall of the heart," the Evening Bulletin reported. "In time, they said, it would have worn a hole in the muscle. " Thanks to Dr. Flick, the spent bullet became a belated Christmas present for the girl. "He followed up on her a couple of years later, and she was doing fine," Dr. Flick's daughter, Louise, said in an interview.
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