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NEWS
August 16, 1988 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Pennsylvania's coin and bullion dealers are pushing a bill that would exempt them from having to pay the state's 6 percent sales tax. The bill, scheduled for a hearing by the House Finance Committee in King of Prussia today, is opposed by the state Revenue Department, which maintains that carving out a new exemption for the coin and bullion industry could cost the state as much as $10 million a year in revenue. The legislation's sponsor, Rep. Raymond Bunt Jr. (R., Montgomery)
BUSINESS
January 17, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Gold prices continued to climb on world markets yesterday in tumultuous trading. Buyers scrambled for gold, sending the price to its highest level since July 1984. In London, the gold price jumped almost $15 a troy ounce, to a bid price of $361, while in Zurich the price of the metal surged $13 an ounce, to $360.50. Later, in New York, gold posted more modest gains. On the Commodity Exchange, gold for delivery in January closed at $356.60 an ounce, up $7.10 from Wednesday.
NEWS
September 27, 2009 | By Mario F. Cattabiani and Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Your parents didn't pay a sales tax to put you in diapers. Neither will your loved ones when they put you in the ground. In the half-century since Pennsylvania enacted its sales tax, the state has carved out exemptions for goods and services that run the gamut from cradle to grave. Typical exemptions are for basic needs - food and clothing. Or caskets and burial vaults, "the final basic necessity," says the reasoning in Gov. Rendell's phonebook-thick 2009-10 budget book. But as Rendell has pointed out lately, the list includes gold.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1988 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
The one investment that truly glittered last year was gold. Prospects are for at least some of that gleam to carry over into the new year. While many stocks were digging themselves a hole, the price of gold shot up from $405 an ounce last Jan. 1 to $500 at one point before drifting back to a bit over $480 at year-end. Gold-oriented mutual funds were the leaders of the fund pack. Through mid- December, the 25 gold-oriented funds tracked by Lipper Analytical Services were up almost 37 percent for the year.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By Henri Sault, INQUIRER COINS WRITER
Spain had hoped to have restored its Segovia Mint in time for the Columbus quincentennial, but Spanish officials now say it will take several years more. The mint in Segovia, powered by waterwheels, may have been put in operation as early as 1574. The Austrian-designed mill became the model for all of Spain's mints, and those of Spanish colonies around the world. The Segovia Mint continued operation through 1869. Its restoration became a project for Glenn Murray, an American who won funding support from the American Numismatic Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The comedies made after World War II at England's Ealing Studios are justly celebrated as the golden age of British screen comedy, and its king was Alec Guinness. The Lavender Hill Mob (1951), along with Kind Hearts and Coronets, The Man in the White Suit and The Ladykillers, forms a classic foursome. Guinness filmed them after making his mark in Dickens in the screen versions of Great Expectations and Oliver Twist. He is at his most disarming and deceptive peak as Henry Holland, the bank clerk in The Lavender Hill Mob. The movie teamed him with the gifted Stanley Holloway and two rising Cockney comedians, Sidney James and Alfie Bass.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By Murray Kempton
Louis Napoleon Bonaparte had been president of France for less than a year when Alexis de Tocqueville marked him down among those unhappily destined spirits who mistake their luck for their genius. Louis Napoleon went on to be the Emperor Napoleon III and had an 18-year run until 1870, when he lurched into the Franco-Prussian War. He had been written off soundly if too soon. We could apply de Tocqueville's terms to the troubles of H. L. Hunt's three eldest sons with the amendment that they mistook their father's luck for their own genius.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2011 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
I frequently receive questions from investors who buy precious metals in their portfolios, as well as in physical form, and two things happened last week that give insight into investor sentiment toward gold. Professional Wall Street investors are buying. If you are a consumer and interested in buying precious metals, you are in good company. But have an absolute sense of market prices and just what form of gold you are purchasing. First, a very successful hedge-fund manager, David Einhorn, who founded Greenlight Capital , said he was shifting money out of gold bullion (the physical metal)
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | By Oshrat Carmiel INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Twenty years ago, eager investors flocked to Richard L. James' New Hope metal shop with their savings and their hopes, investing both in blocks of solid silver. These days, their returns are meager: from $2 to $25 a year, enough to buy some cigarettes or fill a tank of gas. James' business, New Hope Gold & Silver Refinery, folded in 1981, and a year later, James pleaded guilty to concocting what prosecutors say may be the largest fraud scheme in Bucks County history. He bilked 348 people of $882,000, and a county judge ordered that he pay it back in $1,500 monthly installments.
NEWS
August 4, 1997
Deep-sea archaeology's ship has come in. Technology, some of it just emerging from Cold War secrecy, has brought a vast and varied trove of lost ships that never did reach port within the avid reach of researchers and adventurers. Last week, Robert Ballard, the "underwater Indiana Jones" who found the Titanic and the Bismarck, unveiled finds from a spring expedition to the Mediterranean that used a once-secret U.S. Navy nuclear submarine equipped to scuttle along the ocean floor.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 8, 2011 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
I frequently receive questions from investors who buy precious metals in their portfolios, as well as in physical form, and two things happened last week that give insight into investor sentiment toward gold. Professional Wall Street investors are buying. If you are a consumer and interested in buying precious metals, you are in good company. But have an absolute sense of market prices and just what form of gold you are purchasing. First, a very successful hedge-fund manager, David Einhorn, who founded Greenlight Capital , said he was shifting money out of gold bullion (the physical metal)
NEWS
September 27, 2009 | By Mario F. Cattabiani and Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Your parents didn't pay a sales tax to put you in diapers. Neither will your loved ones when they put you in the ground. In the half-century since Pennsylvania enacted its sales tax, the state has carved out exemptions for goods and services that run the gamut from cradle to grave. Typical exemptions are for basic needs - food and clothing. Or caskets and burial vaults, "the final basic necessity," says the reasoning in Gov. Rendell's phonebook-thick 2009-10 budget book. But as Rendell has pointed out lately, the list includes gold.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2009 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
If economic worries - and brash advertisements - are driving you to consider investing in gold, these Web sites could give you pause, and help you make an informed decision on the goodness of gold. Is it safe? This Time magazine story suggests that gold's value is "a collective hallucination" - just as the values of a lot of other things, including cash, are. And of course the "hallucination" of stock and house values shows how low our dreams can drag us. Still, the suggestion here is that a bit of gold in the portfolio is a good hedge - even if holding gold means simply hanging onto your jewelry.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2004 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just past a small golf course, next to a modest ski hill, is a pile of gold worth more than $20 billion. More than 34,000, 400-ounce gold bars are stacked in the basement vaults of an unassuming building screened by a stand of trees: the nation's least-known mint. This is the shrinking-violet little sister of the Philadelphia and Denver mints, a low-profile, closely guarded treasure trove that makes all the nation's American Eagle gold, platinum and silver coins. About 500 million ounces of gold each year are stamped into one-ounce, half-ounce, quarter-ounce and tenth-ounce coins here.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2003 | By Porus P. Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gold hit a six-week low yesterday. Two weeks ago, it was near its six-year high. Is this the beginning of the end for the glittering run-up in the price of the metal and of gold-mining-company stocks? Or is it just another pause before the next surge, one of several gold has had along the way as it began rising in late 2000? It depends, some analysts said, on whether there is more or less likelihood of a war with Iraq and whether the dollar recovers the ground it has lost to the euro.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2001 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
To strike or not to strike more silver bullion Buffaloes, a contentious issue in late summer, turned to dust last month when Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill brushed it off. No more Buffaloes, O'Neill decided. Too much else going on in the world. Investors stood to gain by his decision, but collectors stood to lose by not having more of the popular replicas of the old Buffalo nickels available. Once the half-million coins were distributed, both sides had gone to Treasury to fight hard for their opposing cases.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
Canada has struck three coins in its 2001 "Land, Sea and Rail" series, one-ounce silver bullion coins that carry a holographic cameo on the reverse. The coins were introduced in New Brunswick, site of the building of the sailing ship Marco Polo that is featured on the third coin. The Marco Polo was built in 1851 and hailed as the fastest ship afloat. It cut a week off the sailing time from England to Australia, and it took only 15 days to sail from New Brunswick to England on its maiden voyage.
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | By Oshrat Carmiel INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Twenty years ago, eager investors flocked to Richard L. James' New Hope metal shop with their savings and their hopes, investing both in blocks of solid silver. These days, their returns are meager: from $2 to $25 a year, enough to buy some cigarettes or fill a tank of gas. James' business, New Hope Gold & Silver Refinery, folded in 1981, and a year later, James pleaded guilty to concocting what prosecutors say may be the largest fraud scheme in Bucks County history. He bilked 348 people of $882,000, and a county judge ordered that he pay it back in $1,500 monthly installments.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1998 | By Henri Sault, FOR THE INQUIRER
While Andre Dawson was going deep to snare balls hit to the outfield in Montreal and then Chicago, he was also going deep to collect valuable U.S. coins. The former Expo and Cubs all-star will see his collection auctioned Sept. 24-25 at the Long Beach, Calif., Coin Expo. Dawson had worked with a dealer in Florida to amass a gathering of coins that is noteworthy for condition and rarity. Heritage Numismatic Auctions will sell Dawson's 1897-O half dollar, an 1854-S gold eagle, and an 1800 silver dollar, headliners in his collection.
NEWS
August 4, 1997
Deep-sea archaeology's ship has come in. Technology, some of it just emerging from Cold War secrecy, has brought a vast and varied trove of lost ships that never did reach port within the avid reach of researchers and adventurers. Last week, Robert Ballard, the "underwater Indiana Jones" who found the Titanic and the Bismarck, unveiled finds from a spring expedition to the Mediterranean that used a once-secret U.S. Navy nuclear submarine equipped to scuttle along the ocean floor.
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