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Bumper Crop

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NEWS
July 27, 2004
REGARDING the piece on the Democrats' ho-hum political buttons and bumper stickers: The author must not have looked too hard. I went through a common search-engine and was able to purchase some great stuff. How about: "There's a Village in Texas Missing Their Idiot. " "Like Father Like Son: One Term. " "GOP: Leave No Billionaire Behind. " "Stop Mad Cowboy Disease. " I don't know about you, but I think they're pretty funny. Lindsay Mace George Haddonfield, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2006 | By NATALIE HAUGHTON Los Angeles Daily News
Bite into a jewel - a glamorous, ripe red strawberry - and you're in for an explosion of fabulous sweet flavor. At least that's what many consumers are experiencing with this year's crop of excellent berries. Providing Mother Nature cooperates, it's anticipated that there will be plenty of excellent-quality, ruby-red treasures available throughout the year as California growers, who produce 88 percent of the nation's strawberry crop, are now marketing berries year-round. "The projected strawberry crop for '06 is 2.2 billion pounds, up 8 percent over last year's record-breaking crop of just over 2 billion pounds," said Steve Lyle of the California Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's red and white and may soon be seen gracing the bumpers of hundreds of South Jersey automobiles. It's the "Shop Historic Haddonfield" bumper sticker, the opening shot in the campaign recently initiated by the Haddonfield Preservation Society to promote the borough's historic business district. The campaign will tout the major economic assets of the business district - "the pleasures of Main Street shopping in a historic and beautiful town," according to Joan Aiken, executive director of the society and campaign program coordinator.
NEWS
April 5, 1986 | By Ron Gower, Special to The Inquirer
Just three weeks ago, Sydney Kurtz, an assistant district forester, could not get to fire-lookout towers in Schuylkill County because of too much snow. This week, Kurtz was in those same woods, this time sweating in 80-degree temperatures while helping to combat what he called "a bumper crop" of forest fires. Kurtz said the sudden warm weather has quickly melted the snow and have turned the forest into a tinderbox. On Tuesday and Wednesday alone, flames consumed more than 1,000 acres in the Weiser Fire District, which includes Carbon County, northern Lehigh County, Schuylkill County and part of Berks County.
NEWS
December 21, 2007
IS IT JUST US, or did 2007 produce a bumper crop of bad parents? It seems that over the past few months, we've read far too many sad stories featuring mothers and fathers whose poor parenting skills have had a direct, and sometimes deadly, impact on their children. So, as the year winds down and critics publish their "best of 2007" lists, here are our nominees for Best Bad Parents of the Year: Danielle Cattie: She allows her daughter, Ebony Dorsey, 14, an honor student, to baby-sit her boyfriend's 4-year-old daughter overnight at his house . . . the one he shares with his wife.
NEWS
October 18, 1996 | By Gwendolyn Crump, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The next time you grab a glass of cranberry juice, keep this in mind - the berries used to make that beverage most likely grew in Burlington County, New Jersey's cranberry heartland. Growers will be harvesting cranberries through the end of this month, and officials at the New Jersey Department of Agriculture say they are anticipating a bumper crop of berries - 525,000 barrels, an amount equal to 52.5 million pounds. That's a lot of cranberry sauce! But the current harvest comes in second to the 558,000 barrels of cranberries harvested in 1994, said New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture Arthur Brown Jr. State agriculture statistics show that in 1994, cranberries were the third largest revenue-producing fruit or vegetable in New Jersey, following peppers and tomatoes, respectively.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Many people assume the nation's prolonged recession means that nothing much is getting built in Philadelphia. That's because they're looking up instead of looking down. Today, the real action is on the ground, and Philadelphia is enjoying a bumper crop of new parks. Since opening two weeks ago, the Race Street Pier, the scenester hangout on the Delaware, has monopolized most of the attention, but at least four more designer parks are set to open before the year is out. Several existing oases - from the hole-in-the-wall Chestnut Street Park to sprawling Hunting Park - also are in various states of refurbishment.
SPORTS
December 7, 1992 | By Glen Macnow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Staff writer Frank Fitzpatrick contributed to this article
The Cincinnati Reds boldly sign lefthander John Smiley, a free agent who has won 57 games in the last four seasons. The Phillies, meanwhile, swap two prospects for lefty Danny Jackson, winner of just 21 games in the same period. The San Francisco Giants wave $43 million before Barry Bonds. The Phils target mediocrities such as Milt Thompson and Pete Incaviglia. Kirby Puckett, a magnetic all-star, asks to meet with the Phillies' brass, whose members respond as if they discovered something nasty stuck to their shoe.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A 210-acre farm in New Hope has been transformed into a community art school with classes in painting, drawing, sculpting, printmaking and more. The University of Pennsylvania's Edna and Monroe C. Gutman Center for the Fine Arts was launched this fall with four courses and 20 students. In the spring, the program will be expanded to eight classes, along with special programs for adults and children. Most courses, held on Saturdays, are taught by students or graduates of Penn's Graduate School of Fine Arts.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | NICOLE HOFER/ DAILY NEWS
A nosy camera catches a dandelion in the act of propagating itself far and wide to guarantee another bumper crop of lawn blooms next spring. This reproductive ritual took place along Kelly Drive. If you're wondering where the yellow went, this is the dandelion's colorless end stage. Each puffy ball of fluff supposedly contains 65 seeds that will be wind-carried to grassy locations where they'll nestle and develop thick, hairy taproots that may go down as deep as three feet. Lawn lovers consider them ugly, pesky weeds, but connoisseurs smack their lips contemplating dandelion wine and salads made from dandelion greens.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Kendall Dietterich and her six siblings were growing up on Freeman School Farm in Schwenksville, the whole family would pitch in, cutting and baling 50 acres' worth of hay each June. But now, it's just Dietterich and her husband caring for the fields, horses and goats, plus two children, ages 8 months and 2 years. The farm has been losing money, so a few years ago, her siblings began pushing her to sell. Dietterich offered an alternative: Turn the farm into a part-time wedding venue.
NEWS
October 7, 2013 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
'It's so good listening to old records," Allen Toussaint sings on his new album. And it's so good to hear old masters Toussaint and Ry Cooder in such fine form on their new records. Their live sets are among a spate of our favorite new roots-related releases. Songbook ( Rounder **** ) captures just Touissant and his piano at New York's Joe's Pub in 2009. The 75-year-old giant of New Orleans music is known more as a composer and arranger than as a performer, but like the great soul songwriter Dan Penn, he's as good an interpreter of his own material as anyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Ann Montchyk doesn't have to tell you that she's a Phillies fan, a Christian, and a political conservative. Her 2005 Toyota Camry - specifically the many stickers on its bumper - does that for her. Her car is a mobile messaging system, her way of expressing her views while encouraging others to share them. "I want people to think about these things," said Montchyk, 88, of Erdenheim. "If they're stuck at a traffic light, staring, they're reminded. " It's easy to get lost in the crowd of the billions of humans crowding the planet.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Major-league baseball historians refer to the first 20 years of the 20th century as the "Dead Ball Era. " South Jersey baseball has entered the "Live Arm Era. " Both time periods have stressed the same aspects of the sport: fielding, baserunning, situational hitting and, most of all, the performance of the guys on the pitching mound. "There are just so many good arms out there," Bishop Eustace coach Sam Tropiano said. "I'm not sure I've ever seen this many who are this good. " Combined with last season's rule change that reduced the "trampoline effect" of composite bats - an equipment switch that lessened the power of the rebound of the ball off the bat - the emergence of so many accomplished pitchers has transformed the sport.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Edward Colimore and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The pink blossoms started showing up in March, long before their usual appearance. Now, at orchards across New Jersey and Pennsylvania, peaches are being harvested a full two to three weeks ahead of schedule. "People are excited about everything being early," said Eric Johnson, co-owner of Johnson's Corner Farm in Medford, where the harvest began Saturday. "Typically, we'd begin picking in the third week of June. " Not this year, not after the warmest first four months since the start of official temperature records in 1874.
FOOD
September 1, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Sharing the same economy with double-digit unemployment is a rush of restaurant openings. Construction and real estate costs are down. The workforce is eager. Entrepreneurs want to put their money where (patrons') mouths are. A review of 60 restaurants due to open in the remainder of 2011 shows a mix of price ranges, styles, and ambition. Pockets of Center City, especially near Broad Street and Rittenhouse Square, are the hottest areas. The restaurant zone of Washington Square West, now concentrated on 13th Street between Chestnut and Walnut Streets, will expand south.
NEWS
July 3, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MIDDLE TOWNSHIP, N.J. - James Wright had never worked on a farm before. Now the former line cook from Philadelphia spends his days planting and plowing a verdant field at Bruised Reed Farm in Cape May County. "It gives me something positive to do, something to keep me busy," he said. "It keeps me off the street. " Five days a week, Wright, 61, is among a dozen or so men transported from the Atlantic City Rescue Mission to the 31/2-acre agricultural project in Goshen, where produce is cultivated for use in the homeless shelter's kitchen.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Many people assume the nation's prolonged recession means that nothing much is getting built in Philadelphia. That's because they're looking up instead of looking down. Today, the real action is on the ground, and Philadelphia is enjoying a bumper crop of new parks. Since opening two weeks ago, the Race Street Pier, the scenester hangout on the Delaware, has monopolized most of the attention, but at least four more designer parks are set to open before the year is out. Several existing oases - from the hole-in-the-wall Chestnut Street Park to sprawling Hunting Park - also are in various states of refurbishment.
LIVING
May 2, 2010 | By Katie Haegele FOR THE INQUIRER
The sun is out, the flip-flops are on, and this spring has produced a bumper crop of young-adult novels. Here's a handful worth looking at: The Girl With the Mermaid Hair By Delia Ephron (Harper Teen, $16.99) In this funny and nuanced novel, Delia of the Ephron media empire takes on some interesting subjects, starting with that teen phenomenon, the taking of a "selfie. " Fifteen-year-old Sukie is obsessed with her phone - with taking pictures of herself with the thing, mostly, but also with waiting for a text from Bobo, the improbably named football hottie she's always hoping to hear from.
NEWS
December 17, 2009 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
"FOR better or for worse, this individual has done the most to influence the events of the year. " So reads the preamble to Time magazine's annual Person of the Year distinction, conferred yesterday on Ben Bernanke, the Fed chairman. It isn't an "award" in the traditional sense, but an acknowledgment that an individual, group or movement made headlines and influenced people throughout the world in ways nobody else had. As the definition notes, that can be for better or for worse.
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