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Burpee

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BUSINESS
March 31, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
W. Atlee Burpee Co., the world's largest mail-order seed company, has been sold to a group of private investors for an undisclosed price. Harvey Snyder, a Burpee spokesman, said Clayton & Dublier, a New York investment group agreed last Friday to sell the firm to B.T. and Wicks Capital, two New York investor groups, and to Burpee's current management. Clayton & Dublier purchased Burpee, whose headquarters are in Warminster, Bucks County, from ITT Corp. in December. ITT Corp.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1991 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, Inquirer Staff Writer
W. Atlee Burpee & Co., of Warminster, the nation's leading producer and distributor of seeds for home gardens, yesterday said that it had sold a majority interest to Geo. J. Ball Corp., of West Chicago, Ill. Ball is a major commercial seed grower whose six subsidiaries have operations throughout the world. Both Burpee and Ball are privately held, and the companies would not disclose details of the agreement. "From our perspective and Ball's, this will provide us with an opportunity to take advantage of synergies and research and development in seed breeding, production and distribution," said Christian M. Troll, president and acting chief executive officer of Burpee.
NEWS
March 3, 1991 | By Betsey Hansell, Special to The Inquirer
If you've ever had the thrill of sticking a few tomato, zinnia or pumpkin seeds into dirt, applying water and watching impatiently for tiny, pale leaves to emerge, or if you sow seeds by the thousands into rich Bucks farmland, you probably know the name Burpee. W. Atlee Burpee Co. of Warminster, the proud parent of Big Boy tomatoes, Firecracker Zenith Hybrid zinnias and, new this year, Sweet Bush Hybrid cantaloupe is the largest breeder and distributor of seeds to home gardeners in the country.
NEWS
November 15, 1987 | By Joe Fite, Special to The Inquirer
With the first snowfall of the season on the ground Wednesday night, the Warminster Township Zoning Hearing Board made it possible for spring gardeners to purchase supplies. The W. Atlee Burpee Seed Co., a national mail order supplier of seeds for flowers and vegetables located on Park Avenue in Warminster, applied to the board for a use variance to sell garden and agricultural products from a retail store to be at 300 Park Ave. The board approved the variance, 3-0. Burpee, which has two locations on Park Avenue, has an agreement of sale with the Horsham Valley Development Corp.
LIVING
January 4, 1987 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Sooner or later, the gardener's early trip into spring will arrive in the mailbox. This year, it is 200 pages thick, with hundreds of color photographs, all put together by W. Atlee Burpee Co. (Warminster, Pa. 18974). Work started on this catalogue 12 months ago, just as you and I were choosing our seeds from the 1986 edition, and piece by piece it came together for printing late in the fall, at one of the nation's largest printing presses, in Chicago. My catalogue has tomatoes and lettuce on the cover, but Steve Frowine, Burpee's staff horticulturist, says the company puts out about 30 covers each year, testing different layouts and products.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By Laurie T. Conrad, Special to The Inquirer
Charles O. Cresson describes them as "a neat little package of hope. " They are flowering bulbs - gold and purple crocuses, quivering jonquils, iridescent tulips that burst through the chilly brown earth to color our late- winter blues with a fragrant reminder of the warm season ahead. Cresson, a fourth-generation gardener and the new manager of bulbs for W. Atlee Burpee & Co. in Warminster, thinks bulbs are a great harbinger of the gardening season. The planting work is done in the fall, "so in the spring you have the fun of watching them grow," he said.
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gardening is said to be America's favorite pastime, and these are the days that gardeners spend sitting by the fire, contemplating seed catalogues and the pleasure their products will bring in the spring. W. Atlee Burpee Co. is one of the seed granddaddies, and now it's branching out from Beefsteak tomatoes and Zenith zinnias into the travel game. Later this year, the Warminster-based Burpee will sponsor garden tours to Hawaii, Southern California and the Canadian Rockies, and cruises down the Mississippi and along the coast of China.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles O. Cresson, an author on gardening, has been given the opportunity to practice what he preaches. Cresson, the author of The 60 Minute Flower Garden, has been named bulb product manager of the W. Atlee Burpee & Co., in Warminster, where one of his responsibilities will be cultivating the design gardens photographed in the Burpee catalog. He also will be responsible for merchandising and strengthening the quality of the company's bulbs. Burpee is the nation's largest mail-order supplier of seeds, plants and gardening supplies for home gardeners.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
W. Atlee Burpee Co., the world's largest mail-order seed company, has been sold to a group of private investors for an undisclosed price. Harvey Snyder, a Burpee spokesman, said Clayton & Dublier, a New York investment group, agreed Friday to sell the firm to B.T. and Wicks Capital, two New York investor groups, and to Burpee's current management. Clayton & Dublier purchased Burpee, whose headquarters are in Warminster, Bucks County, from ITT Corp. in December. ITT Corp. owned Burpee from 1979 to 1986.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1986 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer (United Press International contributed to this article.)
ITT Corp., in the latest move in what it calls an "ongoing asset redeployment program," has agreed to sell its lawn and garden group, including W. Atlee Burpee Co. of Warminster, to Clayton & Dubilier Inc. of New York. The leveraged buy-out calls for Clayton & Dubilier to pay about $150 million in cash for the ITT lawn and garden group, including Burpee's parent, O.M. Scott & Sons Co., which is based in Marysville, Ohio. Burpee, founded in Philadelphia in 1876, is among the acknowledged leaders in the mail-order vegetable- and seed-catalogue business.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Patricia Schrieber, Inquirer Columnist
Plant peas and tomato seeds this weekend. Because peas take about two months from seed to harvest, early April is the latest you can plant them and still get good results. Peas like cooler temperatures, so plant them outdoors in the ground or in a container that's about 12 inches deep. I chose edible-pod Burpee 'Super Snappy' Pea this year, based entirely on the claim that they would produce huge peas, something I can't wait to taste. As for those tomato seeds, there's no time to waste.
FOOD
September 13, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
WALLAND, Tenn. - In the spring of 1959, young John Coykendall was exploring the abandoned Ebenezer Railroad Station in Knoxville when he came across a "life-altering" treasure: the keys to a 100-year-old garden. Stashed among some old newspapers and magazines was a perfectly preserved 1913 catalog from the William Henry Maule seed company in Philadelphia. Seed catalogs may not be the stuff most 16-year-old boys dream of. But for Coykendall, a future farmer and artist who would earn a master of fine arts degree in printmaking and engraving, the catalog's exquisitely illustrated pages of Noxall beans, Surehead cabbage, and Tennessee sweet potato pumpkins lit a flame that would inspire his career.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's Thursday morning, the air is crisp - 52 degrees - and Audrey Gillespie, Margaret Hunter, Peg Fitzhenry, and Donna Cole are exercising their annual rite of spring: a daylong trek to the Amish and Mennonite plant nurseries that straddle the Lancaster and Chester County line. The itinerary, long familiar to serious gardeners in the region, but virtually unknown to everyone else, is meticulously plotted in advance. It would take almost eight hours and 124 miles to complete, and would include nine stops - eight greenhouses and farm markets that sell plants, with a quick lunch at a Pennsylvania Dutch eatery in Blue Ball, where hamburgers cost $2.35 and lettuce-and-tomato sandwiches a nickel more.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Ball Jr., owner of W. Atlee Burpee & Co., unleashed a wave of anger and sadness among exotic-plant lovers in Philadelphia and beyond when he closed the renowned Heronswood Nursery near Seattle at the end of May. Ball, a third-generation seedsman, had purchased Heronswood in 2000 from founders Dan Hinkley and Robert Jones with hopes of expanding the market for the unusual plants Hinkley collected from the high Himalayas, Tasmania, New...
BUSINESS
October 5, 2001 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After several acquisitions and a stand-alone retail-gardening operation failed to germinate, W. Atlee Burpee & Co.'s parent has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Burpee Holding Co., a garden-seed supplier in Warminster, said the filing did not involve its four operating subsidiaries, which the company said would not be affected. "This is just a credit and financing issue for the holding company," George C. Ball Jr., the company's chairman, said yesterday. Though he would not be specific, Ball said the company's finances had come under pressure from several acquisitions that had not paid off. "It was a question of our banks' patience with our performance," Ball said in explaining the Sept.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Slightly more than a year after opening three retail stores, W. Atlee Burpee & Co. is closing those locations to return to its "roots" of catalog and Internet sales. The 125-year-old firm, founded in Philadelphia, got its start selling specialized seeds via catalogs. Last year, Burpee added retail sales by opening stores in Medford, Burlington County; Horsham, Montgomery County; and Downers Grove, Ill. They are expected to close in mid-June. The stores sold flower and vegetable plants and seeds, gardening tools, and household decorations.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Though management at W. Atlee Burpee & Co. says current evaluations of its three national retail stores are standard procedure, local employees and township officials are worried that the gardening store here may close as early as June 15. The 125-year-old Burpee Co., which got its start selling specialized seeds, opened its first store in Chicago in April 2000 and opened two more, one in the Medford Center strip mall and one in Horsham, Montgomery...
NEWS
May 1, 2000 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
W. Atlee Burpee & Co. is planning to open Burpee Gardens on May 11 at 1424 Easton Rd., Horsham. Besides a full supply of flower and vegetable seeds, outdoor furniture and a wild-bird center, the store will have kiosks where customers can log on to the company's Web site to find answers to their gardening questions. PROGRAMS The Nonprofit Council of the Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce will hold a seminar on "Selling your services to clients, funders and volunteers" from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Friday at the Center for Technical Studies, 821 Plymouth Rd., Norristown.
NEWS
April 9, 2000 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Burpee, the mail-order horticultural company made famous in 124 years of selling seeds, is scheduled to open next month on Route 70 the largest of its new retail stores. "Burpee is known as a catalog company," said Anita M. Alvare, a company spokeswoman. "Then came our Web site and e-commerce. And now we're getting into retailing. " She said Medford was perfect because of its location and demographics. Its approximately 23,000 residents are among the wealthiest in South Jersey, and Medford is only 20 miles from Philadelphia.
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