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NEWS
January 27, 2012 | BY VINNY VELLA, vellav@phillynews.com 215-854-5905
DRIVERS for a Montgomery County-based bus company cited for allegedly endangering the safety of passengers has been hit with a restraining order for ignoring a Department of Transportation mandate to cease operations. "Safety is our highest priority," said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, in announcing the restraining order yesterday, issued by U.S. District Court against Double Happyness Inc., headquartered in Huntingdon Valley. "We will not tolerate irresponsible bus companies that jeopardize the safety of bus passengers and other motorists.
NEWS
March 31, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - As a Senate panel investigated passenger bus safety, the U.S. Department of Transportation on Wednesday shut down the Wilkes-Barre bus company involved in a deadly accident this month. Super Luxury Tours violated federal insurance requirements, the Transportation Department said. One of the company's Philadelphia-bound buses crashed March 14 on the New Jersey Turnpike, killing the driver and one passenger. The move to close down the bus company came on the day that a Senate subcommittee chastised the department for moving too slowly to improve bus safety.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1986 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
A sharp growth in recent years in the charter-bus business - spurred in this region by the hotly competitive Atlantic City casino-charter market - is ready to come to a screeching halt because of huge increases in insurance costs and a glut of bus companies, industry officials say. The first big upheaval in many years in the long-distance bus industry occurred only 3 1/2 years ago, when Congress passed the federal Bus Regulatory Reform Act. ...
NEWS
September 15, 1987 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District has temporarily ended yellow bus service today for students at seven more schools because of a shortage of drivers. Over the weekend, the district halted service for about 1,000 public school students who had to take SEPTA buses to school yesterday. Today, 200 more students, at seven private or religious schools, were forced to take public transportation or depend on parents. The affected schools are Gwynedd Mercy Academy, Plymouth Meeting Friends, Penryn School, Greene Street Friends, Immaculate Conception School, Holmesburg Baptist Christian School and Redeemer Lutheran School.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1996 | By Claire Furia, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Philadelphians headed to the first Atlantic City casinos in the late 1970s and early '80s, many were introduced not only to gambling but also to bus travel. And were they surprised. They found plush reclining seats, stereo systems and lavatories instead of the transit-system basics they had expected. Since then, the number of bus tours from points in Pennsylvania has nearly quadrupled to include about 375 scheduled destinations, ranging from the National Aquarium in Baltimore to shows in Branson, Mo., said Eugene Zimmerman, vice president of the Pennsylvania Bus Association.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1987 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this article.)
Greyhound Lines Inc. announced an agreement yesterday to take over the financially ailing Trailways Corp. for $80 million, a deal that, if it receives federal approval, would leave the nation with only one national intercity bus company. Greyhound chairman Fred G. Currey, a Dallas entrepreneur who took control of the nation's largest bus company three months ago, said the acquisition was the only way to salvage several thousand jobs and bus service to communities in 17 states served only by Trailways.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | By Jody Benjamin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a few weeks, summertime crowds will flock here to gamble in the casinos or party on the beach, arriving by plane, train or automobile. Or bus. About 300,000 buses roll into town each year - and a state subcommittee is recommending new legislation to be sure they're safe. Lawmakers gathered in Atlantic City yesterday for a public hearing on a proposal to ensure that the state's inspection system is tough enough to get buses with faulty brakes and dangerous engines off the road.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | By Sally Mackwell, Special to The Inquirer
Avon Grove school board members at their meeting Tuesday endorsed the installation of seat belts on district school buses for children under the age of 4. Board member Kathryn Steele said yesterday that the action was taken at the request of the district's school bus companies, which are installing seat belts to accommodate some drivers whose young children ride along on the morning and afternoon runs. Board member Jean Steele described the vote as a formality and a contractual matter.
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Bristol Township School District's struggle to reduce its proposed $60.84 million budget continues. At Tuesday night's final budget hearing, which lasted five hours, the budget committee found an additional $29,000 to pare. Board members and township residents sit on the committee. In total, the group has suggested that $315,000 be cut from the budget. The largest chunk of this comes from the special-education budget. By taking care of severely disabled children closer to home - instead of as far away as Florida - the district should be able to save about $215,000, said district Business Manager John Vignone.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer
About 350 gamblers were temporarily stranded here yesterday when the buses that brought them to this seaside casino resort were pulled off the road after failing a surprise inspection. Citing faulty equipment, traffic safety inspectors grounded seven of 30 buses that were parked at Brighton Park, a section of the city where the Sands Hotel & Casino, the Claridge Hotel & Casino and Bally's Park Place Casino Hotel are located. Judy Coss, bus management director for the Atlantic County Transportation Authority, said that two buses failed exhaust emission tests, two had faulty brakes, two had tires that were not properly secured, and one had faulty turn signals.
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NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Wolfington Sr., 75, of Center City, president and chief executive officer of the Exton-based Wolfington Body Co., one of the largest school-bus dealers in the nation, died last week at his vacation home in the Poconos. Mr. Wolfington, a longtime Center City resident, died in his sleep sometime from Christmas Eve into Christmas morning in Monroe County, said son Richard Jr. "It was his favorite place on Earth," his son said of the getaway in Skytop. The family business was founded by Mr. Wolfington's great-grandfather in 1876 as a manufacturer of horse-drawn carriages in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2013 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Federal bus-safety regulators have shut down 52 companies in what they describe as a major nationwide crackdown on unsafe outfits, including lines whose drivers had suspended licenses or worked routes of more than 800 miles without rest. The companies aren't just low-cost, fly-by-night carriers - some have transported school bands, Boy Scouts or senior citizens, Anne S. Ferro, administrator of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, said, according to the Associated Press.
NEWS
August 28, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
WHEN BUS DRIVER Trulio Arias stopped at the National Constitution Center in Center City yesterday morning to drop off 36 Chinese tourists, he figured he'd have a quiet hour to himself before he retrieved them and headed to New York City, their next stop. Instead, Arias became the surprise star of a news conference held by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration to announce a national blitz of bus inspections. As TV cameras recorded and the Chinese tourists waited nearby, city police inspected Arias' bus and ordered it out of service until a mechanic could arrive to replace a well-worn rear tire.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a Pennsylvania Turnpike bus crash that killed the coach of a college lacrosse team and her unborn son, Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.) has urged that schools be provided more safety information about buses hired to carry sports teams. "While some colleges and universities may have policies on providing safe transportation, most don't have bus-safety experts," Lautenberg wrote Tuesday to U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and NCAA president Mark Emmert. "As a result, these institutions may not be aware of what information to look for when selecting a bus company or how to find information on their safety ratings.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Following a Pennsylvania Turnpike bus crash that killed the coach of a college lacrosse team and her unborn son, U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.) urged that schools be provided more safety information on buses hired to carry sports teams. "While some colleges and universities may have policies on providing safe transportation, most don't have bus safety experts," Lautenberg wrote Tuesday in a letter to U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and NCAA president Mark Emmert. "As a result, these institutions may not be aware of what information to look for when selecting a bus company or how to find information on their safety ratings.
NEWS
January 15, 2013
Labor mural back on display AUGUSTA, Maine - A mural depicting scenes from Maine's labor history returned to public display Monday, 22 months after the governor set off a political firestorm and spawned a federal lawsuit by ordering it removed. Gov. Paul LePage had claimed the mural, which was in the Labor Department lobby, presented a one-sided view that bowed to organized labor and overlooked the contributions of job-creating entrepreneurs. The mural went back on public view Monday in an atrium that serves as the entryway to the Maine State Museum, Maine State Library, and Maine State Archives.
NEWS
June 1, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators shut down 26 curbside bus operators on Thursday, including three in Philadelphia, one in Delaware County, and seven elsewhere in Pennsylvania, in the largest bus safety crackdown in U.S. history. The bus operators, which carried about 1,800 passengers a day along I-95 between New York and Florida, were cited for a variety of safety hazards, including drivers without valid licenses or medical certifications; buses with uninspected brakes, tires, and lights; and drivers who did not get mandatory rest periods.
NEWS
April 21, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
The parents of 11-year-old triplets who were in a school bus crash in February that killed one of the children are suing the bus and trucking companies involved in the accident. Anthony and Susan Tezsla say the crash, in which a dump truck struck the school bus at an intersection in Chesterfield Township, resulted from negligence on the part of the companies, GST Transport and Herman's Trucking, and their drivers. The Tezslas' three daughters were among about 25 elementary school students on the bus. The accident also severely injured the two other Tezsla sisters and 11-year-old Jonathan Zdybel.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | BY VINNY VELLA, vellav@phillynews.com 215-854-5905
DRIVERS for a Montgomery County-based bus company cited for allegedly endangering the safety of passengers has been hit with a restraining order for ignoring a Department of Transportation mandate to cease operations. "Safety is our highest priority," said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, in announcing the restraining order yesterday, issued by U.S. District Court against Double Happyness Inc., headquartered in Huntingdon Valley. "We will not tolerate irresponsible bus companies that jeopardize the safety of bus passengers and other motorists.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Federal officials have obtained a court order requiring a popular Chinatown bus company to cease all operations after defying a previous order to shutdown. Double Happyness Bus Company transports passengers along the Northeast Corridor, making stops in Philadelphia on the way to Washington D.C., New York City, and Albany, N.Y. Last month, the U.S. Dept. of Transportation declared Double Happyness an "imminent hazard to safety" after a federal review found numerous serious violations of hours-of-service, vehicle maintenance, and controlled substance and alcohol testing rules.
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