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Bus Routes

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NEWS
August 16, 1992 | By David T. Shaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At this time of year, Margie Sunukjian, Downingtown School District's director of pupil services, has her hands full trying to figure out bus routes. By state law, each of the 501 school districts in Pennsylvania must provide transportation for both their own students and those students in the district who attend private schools within 10 miles. For Sunukjian, that means devising routes to pick up and deliver Downingtown's 7,800 students, plus about 1,100 students at 32 private schools in the area.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Although there have been dramatically fewer problems this year with bus routes in the Colonial School District than last year, transportation is still a hot topic. At the school board meeting Thursday night, two residents asked for changes in the bus routes. Stephen Botta of Jolly Road in Plymouth Township complained that the two buses for students attending Archbishop Kennedy High School took 45 minutes to reach their destination although they came within a block of the school halfway through the route.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
The controversial topic of bus routes for the new Hillendale Elementary School will be discussed tomorrow at a Unionville-Chadds Ford school-board committee meeting. The bus routes may be shifted because all fourth and fifth graders in the district will be attending the school, slated to open in September. Under one proposal, the Hillendale students would be bused to their usual elementary school and would have to wait there for up to 20 minutes before being shuttled to Hillendale.
NEWS
August 13, 1987 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Dublin School District has approved bus routes that skip two new subdivisions off Jarrettown Road, despite protest of parents in the subdivisions. Parents at the Dublin Crossing and Dublin Meadows subdivisions said it was not safe for their children to walk through heavy construction areas and along roads without sidewalks to get to school. They asked the school board Monday night to continue last year's busing to the area. "When we approved busing last year, it was on a temporary basis," responded board President Robin Costa, explaining that the area is within the 1 1/2-mile walking radius set by the school district.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
Many Horsham and nearby township businesses are backing, in spirit, a plan for two new SEPTA bus routes, which would serve the Prudential Business Campus and the Prudential Office Campus in neighboring Upper Dublin. Only two, for the time being, are backing the plan in dollars. SEPTA needs $25,300 in private subsidies to pay for service along the routes. Penn Mutual, on the corner of Dresher and Witmer Roads, has pledged $4,800 for the plan, and American Temporary Services at 500 N. Easton Rd. in Willow Grove has pledged $300, according to Elizabeth B. Green, executive director of the Willow Grove Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | By Barbara E. Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
Effective this month, New Jersey Transit has added five routes for handicapped riders. Buses on the routes, available on a 24-hour advanced reservation basis, will be equipped with ramps for wheelchairs and a "kneeling" device that moves the bus steps closer to the sidewalk. "If a person knows they will be riding a bus, all they need to do is find the route, call ahead and a bus will be there," said Lyle Peterson, director of the Newark-based Office of Special Services for N.J. Transit.
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | By Gina Esposito, Special to The Inquirer
About 50 angry parents attended a meeting Tuesday to protest the Upper Darby School District's recent decision to drop four school bus routes that do not comply with the district's transportation policy. The district guarantees transportation to elementary school children who live at least one mile from school, to middle school children who live at least 1.5 miles from school and to high school children who live at least two miles from school. Parents asked school board members why the district maintained the bus routes for many years if the routes did not comply with the policy.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | By Gina Esposito, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Darby School District will continue busing students to its elementary schools, even though nearly 200 children are being bused in violation of the district's transportation policy. School board President Elizabeth M. Eckroade announced the decision at a meeting Tuesday. The children will be bused to their schools until the state Department of Transportation reviews the routes, she said. The school district guarantees transportation to children who live more than a mile from their elementary school, more than 1.5 miles from their middle school or more than 2 miles from their high school.
NEWS
April 4, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA next month will hold public hearings on its proposal to terminate six routes and modify service on nine others. "SEPTA proposes discontinuing six particularly expensive, chronic, low-ridership transit routes and modifying a handful of others to increase operating efficiency," said SEPTA spokeswoman Terry Sawishin. If implemented, the changes would save SEPTA $3 million in operating expenses. SEPTA wants to cut bus service on its Routes 4, 16, 76 and 121 lines, and on two trolley rambles - Welcome Line in Center City, and the Chestnut Hill line.
NEWS
March 4, 1990 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
Holding placards of protest and telling horror stories about uncaring subcontractors, more than 200 Washington Township School District employees and residents protested the school board's proposal to contract out half of the school bus routes over the next three years. The large group, which stood up often to give ovations to speakers on their side of the issue, vented its grievances with the proposed reduction during the public session of the school board meeting Tuesday night.
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NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By David Klepper and Bob Salsberg, Associated Press
NEWPORT, R.I. - Travel eased and life slowly returned to normal for most New Englanders after a massive blizzard, but many remained without power in cold and darkened homes and a forecast of rain brought a new worry: Weight piling up dangerously on roofs already burdened by heavy snow. The storm that slammed into the region with up to 3 feet of snow was blamed for at least 14 deaths in the Northeast and Canada, and brought some of the highest accumulations ever recorded. Still, coastal areas were largely spared catastrophic damage.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | BY SARA KHAN, Daily News Staff Writer khans@phillynews.com, 215-854-5713
SEPTA is extending services for late-night shoppers scouting Black Friday deals on Thursday night. *  King of Prussia Mall: Bus routes 99, 123, 124 and 125 will run on regular schedule. Three extra trips are added to the Route 125 bus. The mall opens at midnight. *  Montgomery Mall: Bus routes 94, 96 and 132 will run on regular schedule until the mall opens at midnight. *  Plymouth Meeting Mall: Bus routes L, 27 and 98 will run on regular schedule. Stores open between midnight and 5 a.m. *  Springfield Mall: Trolley service on route 101 and bus routes 109 and 110 will run on regular schedule prior to the mall's midnight opening.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Frank Kummer, Breaking News Desk
You'll actually be on time for work today. Most of the area's mass transit systems are in good shape, although NJ Transit is still seeing bugs leftover from Sandy's flooding. Downed trees, wires and haywire signals forced either complete shutdowns or serious delays on the Philadelphia region's commuter routes since Sandy struck on Monday. "Everything is running," SEPTA spokeswoman Heather Redfern said this morning. "I think we're good today. " Trains, buses and trolleys are humming along, and the only delays are typical of a routine morning.
NEWS
October 31, 2012 | By Troy Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All SEPTA regional rail lines will be working Wednesday, operating from the normal start of service in the morning on a weekday schedule, SEPTA announced Tuesday evening. Meanwhile, PATCO announced that service resumed at 6 p.m. tonight, with trains departing every half hour. Amtrak was to resume most service in the area Wednesday, though New York City service remains suspended because of tunnel flooding. NJ Transit said it would resume limited bus service Wednesday in Camden.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
NJ Transit will get $2.6 million to move ahead with plans for a "bus rapid transit" route to link South Jersey and Philadelphia, and SEPTA will receive $5 million to upgrade its 69th Street Terminal in Upper Darby, federal transportation officials said Monday. In addition, NJ Transit is getting $73 million to upgrade its statewide bus fleet, including new buses that run on compressed natural gas. The South Jersey rapid-bus system along Route 55, Route 42, and I-676 would allow rush-hour buses to travel on highway shoulder lanes and medians for part of the trip to Philadelphia and would provide 1,800 new parking spaces for commuters in Winslow and Deptford Townships.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NJ Transit will get $2.6 million to move ahead with plans for a "bus rapid-transit" route to link South Jersey and Philadelphia, and SEPTA will receive $5 million to upgrade its 69th Street Terminal in Upper Darby, Obama administration transportation officials said Monday. In addition, NJ Transit is getting $76 million to upgrade its statewide bus fleet and buy new buses that run on compressed natural gas. The South Jersey rapid-bus system along Routes 55, 42, and Interstate 676 would allow rush-hour buses to travel on highway shoulder lanes and medians for part of the trip to Philadelphia and would provide 1,800 new parking spaces for commuters in Winslow and Deptford Townships.
NEWS
June 2, 2012 | By Peter Mucha and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This weekend's traffic hotspots include South Philadelphia this evening, Kelly Drive on Saturday, and the route of Sunday's bike race, from Logan Square to Kelly Drive to Manayunk. Shore-goers have two reasons to get an early start today. The Phillies take on the Florida Marlin at 7:05 p.m. at Citizens Bank Park, which could jam major roads near the sports complex. Also, showers and thunderstorms are in the forecast, with heavy rain more likely after about 9 p.m. To check the forecast, go to Philly.com's weather page . On Saturday, from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m., traffic will be detoured away from Kelly Drive because of the Independence Dragon Boat Regatta.
NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Peter Mucha and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For two weeks starting Monday, SEPTA commuters can drop off canned and boxed food items as part of the annual Stop Hunger at Your Station campaign. A 2 p.m. rally today at 30th Street Station hopes to help get the word out to the public. Last year, more than 17.5 tons of food were collected, according to SEPTA. This year's donations will stock Philabundance's summer meals program to help kids while they won't be getting free or low-cost meals at school. Collection barrels will be available at 44 SEPTA locations, according to spokeswoman Heather Redfern.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
North Philadelphia community activists are set to meet with SEPTA officials Wednesday to to voice their opposition to abbreviating the name of the late civil rights leader Cecil B. Moore on the buses that run along the avenue named in his honor. The route sign on the Route 3 buses that run along Cecil B. Moore Avenue was changed from "Cecil B. Moore Ave. " to "CB Moore Ave. " in December, officials said. Jerri Williams, a spokesman for SEPTA, said the change was made so the sign would be more visible to riders.
NEWS
December 16, 2011
SEPTA's busy C bus route, which carries passengers along Broad Street, will be replaced by two renamed routes, starting Feb. 19. Currently, Route C buses operate on two different route patterns. One takes riders between Broad and Geary Streets in South Philadelphia and 11th Street and Nedro Avenue in North Philadelphia. The other travels Broad Street between City Hall and the Cheltenham and Ogontz Loop on the city's northern border. A new Route 4 will operate between 11th and Nedro (the Fern Rock Transportation Center)
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