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Bush Doctrine

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NEWS
September 5, 2004
With his vow at the Republican National Convention to launch a "liberty century," it's clear that President Bush would commit the United States to a course of long-term nation-building in the heart of the Muslim world. Iraq and Afghanistan are merely the costly, rocky start to this far-reaching plan to bring democracy to what Bush calls "the broader Middle East. " This vision has profound implications. Considering the missteps and setbacks since Baghdad fell, the merits and risks of this doctrine must receive a full airing in the presidential campaign.
NEWS
September 8, 2002 | By Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A year after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, President Bush is advocating a radical new doctrine for protecting America from further harm: Shoot first. Under the emerging "Bush doctrine," the United States reserves the right to attack terrorist groups before they can strike, and attack nations armed with nuclear, chemical or biological weapons before they can use them or share them with terrorists. Bush first articulated the doctrine in a June speech at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.
NEWS
May 23, 2004 | By Dick Polman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly two years have passed since President Bush unveiled his foreign policy revolution, decreeing at West Point on June 1, 2002, that America would reserve the right to launch preventive wars against potentially hostile regimes. The Cold War containment policy was out; the "Bush doctrine" was in. Iraq was supposed to demonstrate this new muscularity. But now it appears that the Bush doctrine could wind up buried in the rubble of war, perhaps affirming John Quincy Adams' 1821 admonition that America shouldn't roam the world "in search of monsters to destroy.
NEWS
December 18, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The most ferocious slugging match at Tuesday's GOP debate didn't feature The bombastic Donald vs. the newly energized Jeb Bush. That, by now, is old stuff. Instead, it pitted Texas Sen. Ted Cruz vs. his fellow Cuban American, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, as they sparred over opposing foreign policy visions - and in the process revealed the growing rift within the GOP over the role America should play in the Middle East. This is big stuff, even though the candidates' errors of fact and Mideast misconceptions were distracting (when in doubt, "bomb, bomb, bomb" seemed to be the common theme.)
NEWS
March 18, 2003 | By Trudy Rubin
So it's war - unless Saddam Hussein leaves the country. So said President Bush last night. But this war is about much more than one Arab despot with awful weapons. Iraq is a test case for a new Bush Doctrine to police the world and remake it in our image. The Bush team assumes that America is so powerful and our leadership so benign that other nations will ultimately accept it. I fear we will wind up giving democracy a bad name. If this war were only about Iraq, the arguments for war would be easier.
NEWS
September 21, 2004
Mistakes made in two wars bring inconsistent responses Two alleged war criminals. Two different endings. One is Lynndie England, a lowly Army private facing a possible court-martial for humiliating Iraqi prisoners, such as holding one on a leash. The other is John Kerry, a Navy officer who was applauded by many for his congressional testimony about GI atrocities such as razing Vietnamese villages and who said in an NBC interview in 1971 that he personally engaged in "atrocities" like "thousands of others.
NEWS
September 24, 2008
READER MIKE Franklin asked why Joe Biden is qualified to be vice president just because of his long tenure in the Senate and said that "career politicians are disconnected from the real world. " I'd have to ask Mr. Franklin the same of John McCain, who has been in the Senate for 22 years and is so disconnected from the real world that he admits that computers - you know, those things that pretty much run the world - are a mystery to him. Mr. Franklin also wrote that he'd "take a fresh face any day" - would that be a reference to Gov. Palin, who doesn't even know what the Bush doctrine is?
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | BY LARS-ERIK NELSON
A group of Irishmen are enjoying a quiet beer at a bar in Queens, when suddenly the door flies open and six men come in. "Everybody up against the wall!" one shouts. "Hands behind your heads!" "And who are you?" a customer asks. "Scotland Yard," the boss replies. "We're hunting Irish Republican Army terrorists. " "What gives you the authority to come bursting in here?" a customer inquires. "This is the United States of America. " "Our authority is the Bush Doctrine," says the English cop. "We have the right to go anywhere to arrest suspected terrorists and bring them back to England for trial.
NEWS
February 12, 2002 | By Robert Kagan
The most imposing secretary of state in recent memory, George P. Shultz, was known in respectable circles as the reasonable moderate in an otherwise hawkish Reagan administration. Liberal columnist Tom Wicker called him the "steady man" on a ship of conservative loonies. So when Shultz, at a congressional hearing in February 1985, suddenly came out swinging for Reagan's controversial Central America policies, literally pounding the table and lecturing committee members about the Communist threat in Nicaragua and El Salvador, the effect was electric.
NEWS
June 16, 2002 | By Trudy Rubin
Unbeknownst to most Americans, President Bush has just spelled out a new strategic doctrine for protecting this country against terrorism. Call it a doctrine of preemption. Its core: The United States must strike at terrorists, or states that sponsor them, before they hit us. The President told West Point graduates on June 1 that Cold War doctrines would no longer suffice. He said containment - a 1940s doctrine designed to stop Soviet expansion - couldn't work against "unbalanced dictators with weapons of mass destruction [who]
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NEWS
December 18, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The most ferocious slugging match at Tuesday's GOP debate didn't feature The bombastic Donald vs. the newly energized Jeb Bush. That, by now, is old stuff. Instead, it pitted Texas Sen. Ted Cruz vs. his fellow Cuban American, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, as they sparred over opposing foreign policy visions - and in the process revealed the growing rift within the GOP over the role America should play in the Middle East. This is big stuff, even though the candidates' errors of fact and Mideast misconceptions were distracting (when in doubt, "bomb, bomb, bomb" seemed to be the common theme.)
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Ten years after the invasion of Iraq, it's clear who lost the war that followed. But it may be years before we know if anyone won. Topping the loser's columns, of course, is Saddam Hussein, with the world better for it. Yet, despite his demise, America is also the loser. The goals the Bush administration set for the war were never achievable, and the costs were greater than most Americans realize, not just in lives and money squandered but in reputation lost. Iraqis were freed from Hussein, but a botched American occupation led to a civil war that killed more than 100,000 civilians and forced millions to flee the country.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Charles Krauthammer
Herewith President Obama's Middle East speech last week, annotated: "It will be the policy of the United States to promote reform across the region, and to support transitions to democracy. " With this, Obama openly, unreservedly, and without a trace of irony or self-reflection adopts the Bush Doctrine, which made the spread of democracy the key U.S. objective in the Middle East. " Too many leaders in the region tried to direct their people's grievances elsewhere.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
By Steve Hallock Despite his compelling humanitarian argument, President Obama's decision to engage American forces in Libya's civil war is a troubling continuation of a long, escalating series of U.S. military efforts carried out under presidential fiat. From Bosnia to Haiti, these excursions have often been undertaken with laudable, compassionate, and democratic goals. The trouble is that since World War II, they have bypassed the constitutional requirement that Congress, not the president, make the decision to go to war. Members of Congress from both parties have criticized the Libya engagement, which has proceeded without any formal congressional approval.
NEWS
September 24, 2008
READER MIKE Franklin asked why Joe Biden is qualified to be vice president just because of his long tenure in the Senate and said that "career politicians are disconnected from the real world. " I'd have to ask Mr. Franklin the same of John McCain, who has been in the Senate for 22 years and is so disconnected from the real world that he admits that computers - you know, those things that pretty much run the world - are a mystery to him. Mr. Franklin also wrote that he'd "take a fresh face any day" - would that be a reference to Gov. Palin, who doesn't even know what the Bush doctrine is?
NEWS
June 16, 2008
More than half the members of the U.S. House of Representatives voted last week to send articles of impeachment against President Bush to the lower chamber's Judiciary Committee. Of course, most of the lawmakers considered their "yes" vote the equivalent of sending Dumbo to the elephant graveyard, from which it would never be seen or heard again. The articles' author, U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D., Ohio), has been written off derisively, both within and outside the halls of Congress, for having launched the impeachment process.
NEWS
March 22, 2006 | By Trudy Rubin
If you were wondering what the White House has learned from three years of Iraq errors, the past week won't offer much comfort. President Bush has been giving speeches assuring Americans that things are going well, with a few speed bumps. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld says that "the terrorists . . . are losing. " But the most unsettling event was the unveiling of a new national security strategy that reaffirms the 2002 Bush doctrine of preemptive war. Preemptive war, you may recall, is the concept that America will attack its enemies - whether state or terrorist group - before they attack us, especially if we think they may use weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
March 17, 2006 | By Paul Krugman
It's time for some straight talk about John McCain. He isn't a moderate. He's much less of a maverick than you'd think. And he isn't the straight talker he claims to be. McCain's reputation as a moderate may be based on his former opposition to the Bush tax cuts. In 2001 he declared, "I cannot in good conscience support a tax cut in which so many of the benefits go to the most fortunate among us. " But now - at a time of huge budget deficits and an expensive war, when the case against tax cuts for the rich is even stronger - McCain is happy to shower benefits on the most fortunate.
NEWS
August 5, 2005 | Paul Krugman
Paul Krugman is a columnist for the New York Times The campaign for Social Security privatization has degenerated into farce. The "global war on terrorism" has been downgraded to the "global struggle against violent extremism" (pronounced "gee-save"), which is just embarrassing. Baghdad is a nightmare, Basra is a militia-run theocracy, and officials are talking about withdrawing troops from Iraq next year (just in time for the U.S. midterm elections). On the other hand, the administration is crowing about its success in passing the long-stalled energy bill, the highway bill and CAFTA, the free-trade agreement with Central America.
NEWS
January 21, 2005
The cherished democratic ideal of freedom took on a grim cast in President Bush's inaugural address yesterday. While the President didn't come right out and threaten more military invasions in far-off lands, it was hard to mistake his combative message to virtually any undemocratic nation on the planet. Embrace liberty, he warned, or face the terrible swift sword of the most powerful democracy on Earth. "This is not primarily the task of arms," the President said. But the expansion of liberty is "the urgent requirement of our nation's security, and the calling of our time.
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