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Business Cards

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BUSINESS
April 6, 1989 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Glossy magazine advertisements, slick pamphlets and roadside billboards traditionally have been the place for vivid, colorful pictures promoting your business. Some companies, though, are now taking a downsized approach to such marketing - downsized to about two-by-three inches. Business cards with pictures on them have moved into corporate America, and the companies selling them say that the cards are "certainly the wave of the future. " "Everything's going visual," said Levander Taliaferro, who recently launched his company - New Concept Business Imaging, at Lansdowne Avenue and Frazier Street in West Philadelphia - to sell the cards.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2000 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
They do not fit easily into your pocket or purse, and you certainly would not want to carry more than a couple with you, but John Novarina is convinced that his "electronic business card" will be a successful marketing tool. About four months ago, Novarina, 34, of Royersford, Montgomery County, began his one-man operation, eCard-etc., creating floppy disks as a replacement for business cards. The label on the disk conveys the usual information - name, address, e-mail, fax number - found on a business card.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1997 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You walk through the glass and wooden doors, and the sight hits you: four glass shelves filled with an array of business cards. But they aren't the typical 3 1/2-by-2-inch cards with name, rank and phone number. There's a neon-green alien printed on a plastic card that feels like the top of a mousepad. There's one card that looks like a check - and was designed to be ripped from a miniature checkbook. There's a folded one for a writer that reveals a tiny typewriter when opened; the paper inside the machine slowly churns out the question "Am I the type writer you're looking for?"
BUSINESS
April 8, 1999 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Aretha Franklin's chart-topper "A Rose Is Still a Rose" shipped to radio stations, instead of a run-of-the-mill round compact disc, DJs found a striking red CD that had been cut into the shape of a blossom. When Miller Brewing Co. wanted to hype its responsible-drinking campaign, it sent distributors something that looked like a credit card with a hole in the middle. It was a pocket-size CD-ROM crammed with multimedia features, including full-color animation, narration, and hyperlinks to Miller's Web site.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1986 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Spagnola, the Philadelphia Eagles tight end, may have been the only man there without a tie - and without a business card. At 6-foot-4, he towered above the crowd, in an open-collared shirt and wool jacket, filling his coat pockets with business cards, but offering none in return. "Just send it to me at the stadium," he told people. "Care of the Eagles. " "I have no idea why I was invited," Spagnola said. "I'm getting business-carded to death. But why not? That's what it's all about.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
AS SINGLE GUYS on the make around Center City for the past 30 years, playboy entrepreneur Harry Jay Katz and playboy defense attorney Chuck Peruto knew each other. How could they not? Philly is a small-town Big City. The movers and shakers, the cons and cops, they move in the same small circles, hang in the same clubs. There weren't that many hot spots back then. Maybe they saw each other at Artemis, or maybe elan, or maybe London Victory, or maybe the Library, all popular meet markets.
NEWS
May 15, 2015
COVERING POLITICS isn't much different than covering the mob. It's mostly backslapping and backstabbing, interrupted by the occasional indictment. And everyone eats well. So we weren't at all surprised when reputed mobster John "Johnny Chang" Ciancaglini called us the other day to chat about the Democratic primary. Ciancaglini wanted us to know that he's not a blood relative of William "Billy C. " Ciancaglini , the long-shot Common Pleas Court candidate who cut the ad of the campaign season - a splendorous YouTube video featuring an instrumental version of Journey's "Don't Stop Believin'.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1988 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Dressler puts people's business cards to work for them. For a fee, she places the cards on bulletin boards that she has installed in restaurants, where people often wait for tables with nothing to do. The boards offer captive audiences a way to pass the time and, at the same time, provide neighborhood firms with a low-cost form of advertising. Dressler's goal is to expand the distribution of business cards for her clients - and her company, American Home Services, was formed last year to do just that.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
On a Tuesday in April, Michael Ford, 30, of South Philadelphia, approached two artists stationed at a folding table in one of City Hall's vaulted passageways. From the pocket of his cargo shorts, he pulled out a mosaic tile he'd made from shattered compact discs, part of a series he's calling "CDecopage. " ("It's the perfect medium," he said - or, at least, it's an affordable one as CDs slide into obsolescence.) He said the piece is a memoir in 16 square inches, telling how he quit a job in health care to be an actor and artist.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1990 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Herb Cohen is the kind of guy who, in high school, volunteered his services as a disc jockey at dances just for the privilege of handing out his business cards. That's right, business cards. What's a high school kid doing with business cards? "I was 12 years old when I had my first set of business cards printed," said Cohen, clearly a precocious networker. "I was told I was always the kind of kid who marched to a different drummer. " These days, Cohen, 33, is marching to the beat of a different, well, synthesizer.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 23, 2016
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Unsettled? Stay flexible. The fact that you don't know what's going to come up next is a good thing. This new path also has many desirable options to please you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Business cards, shopping lists, party plans, requests to friends, tokens, coupons, prayers - consider it all your research. Piece together something beautiful, artistic, and unique. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). People say that you can't make someone love you. Privately you think, "Well maybe they can't, but I can. " You may very well be right.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
On a Tuesday in April, Michael Ford, 30, of South Philadelphia, approached two artists stationed at a folding table in one of City Hall's vaulted passageways. From the pocket of his cargo shorts, he pulled out a mosaic tile he'd made from shattered compact discs, part of a series he's calling "CDecopage. " ("It's the perfect medium," he said - or, at least, it's an affordable one as CDs slide into obsolescence.) He said the piece is a memoir in 16 square inches, telling how he quit a job in health care to be an actor and artist.
NEWS
November 9, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Back when the Latham was the Latham - the place to be - back when presidents and starlets strolled through the marble lobby, Joe Broderick was always there to open the door. He was hired as a doorman, but from the start, Broderick was always something closer to a concierge. Before all the big joints came to town, you had to stay at the Latham Hotel and you had to ask for Joe. Joe would take care of you. Whatever the situation. Restaurant reservations. Tickets to the latest show. Tickets to an Eagles game.
NEWS
October 17, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Democratic National Convention Committee has settled in Philadelphia and is open for business. Jude Arijaje, owner of Minuteman Press on South Broad Street, stood next to Mayor Nutter and the Democratic National Convention Committee CEO on Thursday in his printing shop as proof that the DNC wants to partner with local businesses in advance of the party's national convention here next year. "Small businesses, large business, we want everyone to have a shot at the pie," the Rev. Leah Daughtry, the convention's CEO, said.
NEWS
May 15, 2015
COVERING POLITICS isn't much different than covering the mob. It's mostly backslapping and backstabbing, interrupted by the occasional indictment. And everyone eats well. So we weren't at all surprised when reputed mobster John "Johnny Chang" Ciancaglini called us the other day to chat about the Democratic primary. Ciancaglini wanted us to know that he's not a blood relative of William "Billy C. " Ciancaglini , the long-shot Common Pleas Court candidate who cut the ad of the campaign season - a splendorous YouTube video featuring an instrumental version of Journey's "Don't Stop Believin'.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
THEY LOOK MORE like siblings than father and son. They act like it, too, the way they playfully rib each other during a lunch break at a deli near Community College of Philadelphia. When I ask the guys for their business cards, Darryl Irizarry Sr. cracks wise. "I don't get cards," he says, as he watches his namesake, Darryl Irizarry Jr., produce his. "I get calls. " The father, 49, is a building engineer at CCP. When he's not working on equipment, he's monitoring it in the boiler room of a building on the main campus.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gwendolyn Faison is used to marking milestones. Camden's first female mayor marked another one over the weekend: Her 90th birthday was Saturday. On Sunday, she celebrated at Camden's Tenth Street Baptist Church, where she has been a member for more than 60 years. Church members, family, and local politicians honored her. But she told the roughly 80 people assembled Sunday she did not need speeches or honors for her birthday. "All you have to do is serve," she said. Those who know her say Faison is a good example of what it means to serve her community.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
They say, if you want something done right, you have to do it yourself. Ask Chaka Fattah Jr., currently defending himself against charges of bank fraud, tax evasion, and stealing government funds, and he just might tell you there's truth in that adage. Prosecutors may beg to differ. Since a judge approved his request to represent himself last month, Fattah - the 32-year-old son of Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.) - has flooded the court with dozens of motions that he hopes will defang the case against him. Call it defense by a thousand pinpricks.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - With nods to history and their future plans, three new members of Congress from the Philadelphia area took oaths of office Tuesday, marking sweeping change to the area's delegation. U.S. Reps. Brendan Boyle (D.) of Philadelphia, Ryan Costello (R.) of West Chester, and Tom MacArthur (R.) of Toms River, N.J., started their House careers as snow coated the Capitol grounds. Counting U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross (D.) of Camden, there are four lawmakers from the area at the beginning of their tenures in Congress.
NEWS
November 29, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jonah Selber is an unlikely philanthropist. When he was born, doctors told his parents that he was severely retarded, so damaged that he should be put in an institution for the rest of his life. "Thank goodness," his mother said, "I was young, strong, in denial, and unwilling to accept that condemnation. " Judith Creed, a speech language pathologist, has dedicated most of her life to helping her son overcome a daunting array of physical and intellectual problems. She stood by him through years of therapy and multiple surgeries, enrolled him in schools where he learned to become more independent, and, several years ago, even gave him one of her kidneys.
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