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Business Center

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NEWS
September 6, 1989 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even with a limit of 17 feet and other signs held to storefront identification, passers-by are going to know the shops are there. And that's all the businessmen asked. Acting on their request, the members of the city's Zoning Board of Adjustment voted unanimously last week to approve the signs for a business center at the edge of Frankford. They conditioned the vote on an agreement that the main, 5-foot-by-10-foot free-standing sign on Kensington Avenue be topped off at no more than 17 feet.
NEWS
November 13, 1986 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Moreland Advisory Planning Agency, embarking on a study of the township's business center, identified traffic snarls caused by retail development as a major problem. The study area lies within a quarter-mile radius of the intersections of Moreland, Easton, Old York and Davisville Roads, all major arteries. The study is designed to identify problems and recommend future development. It will be coordinated by Stephen R. West and John Cover, consultants with the Montgomery County Planning Commission.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The owners of a small business center in Collingdale went before City Council yesterday to ask its support for their efforts to start a similar undertaking in an old mill building in the city. John McMahon and Douglas Wright, who own the Triangle Commerce Center, told the council at its caucus meeting that they are seeking to buy the Irvington Mill at 25th Street and Ridley Avenue in Chester. With them was Glenn Bickel, who is interested in investing in the project. The 6-acre property has several buildings on it, including a former textile, cotton and woolen mill that dates to the 1840s.
NEWS
December 1, 2002 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Debra DiLorenzo, the head of the Southern New Jersey Chamber of Commerce, gave the newly opened Enterprise Center rave reviews after attending a business conference there that she helped organize. In October, about two months after Burlington County College opened the center at its Mount Laurel campus as a venue for corporate conferences and business education, the chamber booked the facility for a management seminar. "I had visited the facility several times while it was under construction, but I really wasn't prepared for what I saw when I walked into the finished building," DiLorenzo said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1997 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Try this as a recipe for success: You are a woman working in a field dominated by men, but you are pretty, smart, competitive and capable. So how could anybody put you down? Well, nobody is putting down Maria Bartiromo. Far from it. After a decade of covering the New York Stock Exchange and Wall Street, tomorrow night at 7 she will premiere as the cohost of her own show, Business Center, on the CNBC cable channel. Her admirers are many. The National Review called her "the Sharon Stone of business cable.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
Ground was broken yesterday for a business center at the American Street Empowerment Zone in North Philadelphia, and front and center at the ceremony were Christopher M. Carabello and Terry Graboyes, whose firms will occupy the building. Carabello is president of Redring Solder and Graboyes heads Graboyes Commercial Window Co. The city also announced a mobile police mini-station for the zone.
NEWS
August 25, 2010 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the brick house where she has lived for 40 years, Joyce Curry has watched with a heavy heart as neighbors move out and Mount Holly Township boards up the houses around her. The 69-year-old resident's Mount Holly Gardens neighborhood soon will grow even emptier. The prominent contractor Winzinger Inc. is assigned to demolish several homes next to Curry's to make way for a 54,000-square-foot business center - a project a Winzinger official has been voting to fund under a state program through her position on the Mount Holly Urban Enterprise Zone board.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1986 | By Meredith M. Henry, Special to The Inquirer
A mortgage company that arranged $7 million in financing for construction of a business center near Philadelphia International Airport filed suit against the developer in Chester County Court yesterday, arguing that it reneged on the deal. The Pro-Gressive Mortgage Corp. of Wayne is seeking a judgment of more than $70,000 against Joseph M. McCawley & Sons of Broomall, the developer of an $8.1 million business center planned for Island and Bartram Avenues. According to the suit, Joseph M. McCawley Sr. and his son, Joseph McCawley Jr., retained Bruce Coin, the director of Pro-Gressive Mortgage Corp.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Factors affecting the changing economy of Northeast Philadelphia will be among topics explored on Councilman Brian J. O'Neill's Cable Town Meeting call-in show at 7 p.m. Wednesday on Comcast Cablevision's Channel 66. The opening of Franklin Mills mall is one such factor. The mall has changed the way some people shop and others work. The effect of the mall is among the key questions that the program's producers expect to be asked of O'Neill and his guest, David F. Liddle, president of the Northeast Chamber of Commerce.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Canadian real estate investment firm Bentall Kennedy has purchased the Chester Creek Business Center in Aston from CSG Partners and The Davis Cos., according to JLL, which represented the sellers in the deal. New York-based CSG and Davis of Boston received $22.8 million for the 179,182-square-foot, three-property portfolio at 100, 120 and 130 Concord Rd., JLL said in a release on Thursday. The complex, built in 2009, is currently 100 percent leased to six tenants, JLL said. jadelman@phillynews.com 215-854-2615 @jacobadelman  
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
City Controller Alan Butkovitz this week became the latest critic of the city's handling of the coming papal visit, with the release of a survey of businesses that largely lambastes the Nutter administration's outreach efforts while offering optimism for the lucrative potential of the weekend. The survey, however, contains several inconsistencies, and includes the responses of only 30 restaurants, 27 hotels, and 11 retail or alternative businesses of the estimated 400 within the most secure perimeter.
NEWS
June 18, 2015
ISSUE | ENERGY Solar, not tankers Philadelphia should be exceedingly proud that it has created a sustainable business center at the former Navy Yard. The $129 million U.S. Department of Energy Innovation Hub hosts numerous energy-efficient buildings and a 35-megawatt unregulated electric grid with leading smart-grid research. Let's hope that Philadelphia's future lies with safe, sustainable energy rather than explosive tanker cars and leaking pipelines that could endanger the city.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
One woman was sitting in a window seat at La Colombe, lost in a discussion about a Macy's sale, when someone snatched her wallet from her purse. Alyssa Abbott had just finished lunch at a Chestnut Street cafe when she noticed how light her tote bag felt. And Temple University student Rachael Young was packing up her laptop at Starbucks when she realized her wallet was gone. Pickpockets. Or, more precisely, the work of what police now call "sneak thieves. " If the best friend of the coffeehouse thief is distraction, then the holiday season, with its crowded shops of hurried shoppers, offers the pickpocket prime opportunities.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When floods of data - linking patients to doctors, gadgets, images, and medicines - used to surge through two aging computer centers near Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals' Walnut Street headquarters, senior director Paul S. O'Connor Sr. worried his network could be "one waterpipe-break away" from paralysis. That's why, over the last two years, Jefferson contracted two off-campus computer-server operators to link its network to Verizon, Comcast, and a half-dozen specialty telecom carriers.
NEWS
March 31, 2013
Taxing for growth must be goal Having been in business in Philadelphia for more than 50 years, I've watched the city's slow decline from a vibrant business center to one that has driven away most large firms and made it extremely challenging for small companies to survive or grow. This didn't have to occur, since Philadelphia has more to offer than almost any other city with which it competes: great history, a walkable downtown, a fabulous array of restaurants and shops, world-class cultural institutions, and much more.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano
Microsoft has joined with some of its big technology clients to fill showrooms in Malvern and 26 other business centers around the globe with fancy, elegant gadgets and applications designed to make offices obsolete. Think. for example, of iPads as big as your wall or as accessible as your home TV screen, where colleagues, clients, and customers can share notes, data, and links, and design and promote projects, in real time. A Canadian company, Smart Technologies, has developed generations of these interactive whiteboards over the last 20 years.
NEWS
December 12, 2011
Wells Fargo & Co., the bank with the most deposits and the most branches in the Philadelphia region, said Monday that it is giving the Wharton Small Business Development Center at the University of Pennsylvania $500,000 to help entrepreneurs start and expand businesses. The multi-year grant will be used to support the small-business center's courses and consulting programs. The Wharton Center said it has worked with 25,000 business over 30 years.    - Harold Brubaker
BUSINESS
February 14, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
In the eight years that Therese Flaherty has been running the Wharton Small Business Development Center , she's seen boom and bust. The center's client base has remained pretty consistent at about 600 businesses annually, but their questions and challenges have changed since the brutal recession. Money, of course, is on the minds of nearly every businessperson, Flaherty said. When they hear that the SBDC has no money to lend to them, that ends the conversation for some of them.
NEWS
August 25, 2010 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the brick house where she has lived for 40 years, Joyce Curry has watched with a heavy heart as neighbors move out and Mount Holly Township boards up the houses around her. The 69-year-old resident's Mount Holly Gardens neighborhood soon will grow even emptier. The prominent contractor Winzinger Inc. is assigned to demolish several homes next to Curry's to make way for a 54,000-square-foot business center - a project a Winzinger official has been voting to fund under a state program through her position on the Mount Holly Urban Enterprise Zone board.
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