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Business Ethics

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BUSINESS
March 26, 2003 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With corporate America's image battered by high-profile scandals, many companies are beefing up programs that train directors, executives and other employees in ethics and legal compliance. The challenge for big companies is figuring out how to reach tens of thousands of employees scattered around the world in a way that does not break the bank. DuPont Co. in Wilmington, Rohm & Haas Co. in Philadelphia, and Unisys Corp. in Blue Bell are among the companies that have been training employees on ethics and legal issues for years but have started using online services to reach deeper into their organizations.
NEWS
February 15, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Rutgers planning business ethics center With people thinking about business ethics since the Enron scandal, Rutgers University said yesterday it will use $600,000 from Prudential Financial to create a business ethics center at its Newark, N.J., campus. The Prudential Business Ethics Center will host conferences, support research by students and faculty and offer ethics training to corporations and small businesses. "What we'd like to do is raise the profile of ethics in business, and help business people understand that focusing on excellence, focusing on doing things right, insistence on high levels of professionalism - all of that's a recipe for success in business," said Edwin H. Hartman, a professor of business and philosophy who will run the center.
NEWS
April 25, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clarence C. Walton, 88, formerly of Rosemont, professor emeritus at the American College in Bryn Mawr and first lay president of Catholic University and an expert in the field of business ethics, died of pneumonia April 13 at his home in Catonsville, Md. "Clarence Walton broke new ground and elevated the study of business ethics to an academic discipline," said Larry Barton, president of the American College, an institute for professionals in...
BUSINESS
December 2, 1996 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To those who see "business ethics" as an oxymoron, the idea that it can be taught is pure paradox. But Thomas Donaldson, the ethics guru who joined the Wharton School faculty this fall, sees no contradiction between moral behavior and profit. He contends, instead, that ethics can drive business success, while unethical actions can be a company's downfall. Donaldson thus saw logic rather than paradox in taking a post at Wharton: It's a powerful pulpit from which to preach the gospel of business ethics.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Energy entrepreneur and Villanova resident Harry Halloran Jr. has donated $10 million to further the study of business ethics at St. Thomas University in St. Paul, Minn. Halloran, 68, is the chairman and chief executive officer of American Refining Group Inc. and founder and chief executive of Energy Unlimited Inc., both in Conshohocken. He also owns several other companies. "There's a role of business that goes beyond profitability," Halloran said in a telephone interview yesterday from a wind-energy conference in Houston.
NEWS
February 7, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard H. Viola, 73, of Jenkintown, a retired professor who specialized in business ethics, died Tuesday at Abington Memorial Hospital of complications from a respiratory illness. Dr. Viola was professor emeritus of the School of Business and Management at Temple University and was retired director of the Graduate School of Management at American College in Bryn Mawr. Dr. Viola, a native of Monaca, in Western Pennsylvania, graduated from Notre Dame University, where he held a baseball scholarship.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2006 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having no desire to see their graduates involved in Enronlike scandals, area business schools have made ethics more of a priority in recent years. Drexel University's LeBow College of Business established the Center for Corporate Governance last year, in part to focus on ethics. It now requires that ethics be integrated into all courses. The University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School last year changed the name of its department of legal studies to the department of legal studies and business ethics.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1987 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
Most area business owners say they don't expect the Oct. 19 stock market crash to change their companies' profits next year, according to a survey announced today. The Philadelphia office of Arthur Andersen & Co., one of the nation's biggest accounting firms, said that 77 percent of the business owners and managers surveyed nationwide said the crash "would not change their forecasted operating results for 1988. " "They just don't think the crash will have a significant impact on their business," said Jack McKee, an Andersen partner here who was involved in the survey.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2002 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With revelations of accounting scandals at such companies as Enron Corp. and WorldCom Inc. still surfacing, one local chief executive officer says that within 10 years, companies will be rated and compared in the media on their ethical behavior. Michel de Rosen, CEO and president of ViroPharma Inc., of Exton, made the prediction yesterday at a Center City breakfast seminar on business ethics. De Rosen, a former chief executive of Rhone-Poulenc Rorer, the Collegeville pharmaceutical company now part of Aventis S.A., said in an interview later that think tanks could come into a company, interview its workers, and determine not only if the firm says it has ethical values, but also if they are practiced.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was Saturday afternoon at the Public Safety Initiative Youth Market, and Corrine Goodman was ready with a beverage dispenser full of pink lemonade, a stack of cups, and her game face. There was just one little challenge, the 10-year-old said, glancing to her right, where Malik Thompson, 14, was standing behind a tray filled with his own ice-cold bottled beverages. "Malik's my competition, because he's selling lemonade that's homemade," she said, acknowledging that hers came from a mix. "But his is $2," she added, "and mine's $1.50.
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NEWS
June 27, 2016
David Thornburgh is president and CEO of the Committee of Seventy Patricia Dowden is president and CEO of the Center for Business Ethics and Corporate Governance The conviction last week of longtime Congressman Chaka Fattah on 22 charges of racketeering, money laundering, and fraud has sent shock waves through the Philadelphia community. "[He] betrayed the public trust and undermined our faith in government," said U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger. And he is only one of an embarrassing list of state and local officials who have recently pleaded guilty or been convicted of public corruption.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was Saturday afternoon at the Public Safety Initiative Youth Market, and Corrine Goodman was ready with a beverage dispenser full of pink lemonade, a stack of cups, and her game face. There was just one little challenge, the 10-year-old said, glancing to her right, where Malik Thompson, 14, was standing behind a tray filled with his own ice-cold bottled beverages. "Malik's my competition, because he's selling lemonade that's homemade," she said, acknowledging that hers came from a mix. "But his is $2," she added, "and mine's $1.50.
NEWS
December 20, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
CLORA CARLTON Faircloth thought of herself as the best cook around. Not the second best, the best! As a result, when Holmesburg Prison officials made her the "second cook" at the former penal institution, she quit. "She was second to none, especially when it came to cooking," said her daughter, Marian McCrimmon. This was the philosophy that carried Clora through a life of accomplishment, as an entrepreneur with restaurants and other businesses on her resume, a church leader and, most of all, a family matriarch.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2013
4-week bills , Apr. 23; 3-month and 6-month bills , Apr. 22; 1-year bills , Apr. 30; 2-year notes , Apr. 23; 3-year notes , May 7; 5-year notes , Apr. 24; 7-year notes , Apr. 25; 10-year notes , May 8; 30-year notes , May 9; 10-year TIPS , May 23; 30-year TIPS , Jun. 20.   Business Referral Luncheon , presented by BNI, King of Prussia chapter. Peppers Italian Restaurant, 236 Town Center Rd., King of Prussia; 610-792-2105. Reservations required.
NEWS
March 10, 2013
The Unexpected Journey of an Activist Entrepreneur and Local-Economy Pioneer By Judy Wicks Chelsea Green. 320 pp. $27.95 Reviewed by Elizabeth Eisenstadt Evans If readers want a tell-all, or a warm and highly personal account of a well-known Philadelphian's life and times in Good Morning, Beautiful Business , they are going to be disappointed. Judy Wicks saves most of her passion for topics such as fair-trade commodities, socially conscious philanthropy, and treatment of edible animals.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2012 | By Peter Vanham, Inquirer Staff Writer
"The time that the business of business was business, is passé. " So says Thomas S. Robertson, dean of the University of Pennsylvania's prestigious Wharton School. His crusade is to make Wharton "a force for social and economic good in the world. " At 69, the mirthful professor has been in Philadelphia for most of his professional life. The Scottish-born Robertson first came to Philadelphia as a Wharton marketing professor in 1971 and stayed for 23 years. He left the city for a position at the London Business School and later became dean of Emory University's Goizueta Business School in Atlanta.
NEWS
August 19, 2012
This letter on pornography and business ethics - written by two public intellectuals, one a Christian, the other a Muslim - was sent to hotel industry executives last month and then released publicly at www.thePublicDiscourse.com . Robert P. George is McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University Shaykh Hamza Yusuf is cofounder and a member of the faculty of Zaytuna College in California We write to...
NEWS
September 11, 2010 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
St. Joseph's University president the Rev. Timothy R. Lannon will resign effective in July to become president at his alma mater, Creighton University in Omaha, Neb., officials announced Friday. Like St. Joseph's, Creighton is a Jesuit university. "I'm excited that I am returning to my alma mater," Lannon, 59, said Friday afternoon from Omaha, where his appointment was announced by the board of trustees. "This was a matter of my life being changed here as a student, and I'd like to give back as best as I can as president.
NEWS
May 6, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John M. Stockton, 86, a teacher at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania from 1953 to 1995, died of Lou Gehrig's disease Sunday, May 2, at his home in Exeter Township, Berks County. Mr. Stockton's educational path suggests how some schools bent rules to honor service during World War II. Born in Scottsboro, Ala., he graduated from Scottsboro Area High School. An Army infantry rifleman from 1942 to 1945, Mr. Stockton fought in the Battle of the Bulge and earned a Bronze Star as well as a battlefield promotion to sergeant from private.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2008 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Energy entrepreneur and Villanova resident Harry Halloran Jr. has donated $10 million to further the study of business ethics at St. Thomas University in St. Paul, Minn. Halloran, 68, is the chairman and chief executive officer of American Refining Group Inc. and founder and chief executive of Energy Unlimited Inc., both in Conshohocken. He also owns several other companies. "There's a role of business that goes beyond profitability," Halloran said in a telephone interview yesterday from a wind-energy conference in Houston.
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