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Business Failures

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BUSINESS
December 5, 1991 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Weakening profits. Plummeting consumer confidence. Continuing layoffs in dozens of industries. Now comes another horseman of the current economic malaise: A soaring rate of business failures. In its current newsletter, the venerable Dun & Bradstreet Corp. reported that U.S. business failures in July jumped 60 percent from July 1990, to 7,627. The July figures marked the 17th consecutive monthly increase from the same month the year before. For the first seven months of the year, business failures were up 51.5 percent compared with the same period a year ago. No region or industrial grouping was spared.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | By R. S. Chaganti
From a historical perspective, the new federal plant-closing law marks the culmination of a decade-long process to restrict business mobility. During the last 10 years, several cities, including Philadelphia, and some states have imposed restrictions on business mobility. In other industrialized nations, advance notification of worker layoffs and plant closings is already a common practice. This is not the first time that the federal government has legislated labor-management practices - consider, for example, the laws setting a minimum wage and worker health and safety rules.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Starting a business is complicated, but there is support for entrepreneurs. And advice can come even from unusual sources. Example: the ex-Navy SEAL with lessons in business leadership. Hard-core leadership lessons are taught at Entrepreneur.com by the likes of well-named Jeff Boss, a former Navy SEAL, now a business consultant. In this recent post, Boss describes the ways "a leader should show up. " That includes dressing the part, listening, and being candid. And, he says, there are no excuses: "Tired after a rough night sleep?
BUSINESS
February 24, 1989 | The Inquirer Staff
Strikes and lockouts fell in 1988 to their lowest level in the 41 years the government has kept track, reflecting a change in attitudes between labor and management, the U.S. Labor Department said yesterday. Only 40 major work stoppages - those involving 1,000 or more workers for one shift or more - began in 1988, involving 118,000 workers. About 4.4 million workdays were lost because of stoppages. The number of stoppages has steadily declined - the 1950s average of 332 a year dropped to 299 in the 1960s, to 270 in the 1970s and to 88 a year between 1981 and 1985.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1987 | The Inquirer Staff
Interest rates on short-term Treasury securities fell in yesterday's auction to the lowest levels in five weeks. The Treasury Department sold $6.6 billion in three-month bills at an average discount rate of 5.40 percent, down from 5.66 percent last week. Another $6.6 billion was sold in six-month bills at an average discount rate of 5.41 percent, down from 5.70 percent last week. The rates were the lowest since Jan. 20, when three-month bills sold for 5.23 percent and six-month bills were 5.27 percent.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1987 | The Inquirer Staff
Dominion Textile Inc. and New York financier Asher B. Edelman launched a $1.62 billion tender offer for Burlington Industries Inc. yesterday after Burlington threatened to use the "Pac Man" defense - buying Dominion first. The Edelman-Dominion group, which owns 11.6 percent of Burlington's 27.3 million common shares outstanding, announced a $67-a-share bid for the remaining stock after Burlington indicated that it strongly opposed the group's earlier offer of $60 a share. Burlington, of Greensboro, N.C., the nation's largest textile-maker, has not commented on the offers but has filed two lawsuits challenging the group's tactics.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | By Ty Tagami, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Plate glass windows covered with butcher paper. Blank stucco facades where plastic letters once announced shops selling office products and car stereos. Though business isn't slowing in this bustling commercial hub, some businesses are failing. "Space available" placards listing realty company names and phone numbers have sprouted up in shopping centers throughout Montgomery Township. At the same time, many businesses still see gold in Montgomeryville, with developers of commercial space begging to get their projects approved.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1994 | By Lara Wozniak, FOR THE INQUIRER
Environmentally sensitive products used to sell only in offbeat camping stores or at collectives run by volunteers in tie-dye. Those days are gone. Now, to be green - or Earth-friendly - is to be mainstream. And profitable. Dan Soskin is cashing in on the green at One World, an environmental store in Haddonfield that celebrated its first anniversary Friday, on Earth Day . "One World is a combination of The Nature Company, The Body Shop and a green store," said Soskin.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1990 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
At tiny Advance Truss Systems Inc. in Plumsteadville, success means just opening the door for business every day. "You're starting from scratch," said John W. Bohn, who runs the firm. "You're starting from below scratch, really. " Confronted with a decline in the housing industry and management problems, Advance Truss, which makes roof frames used in construction, this year filed for protection from creditors in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Philadelphia. The company hopes to hang on until the building industry turns around, said Bohn, who, in addition to spending time in the office, works on the shop floor with the Bucks County firm's seven other employees.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1993 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
CAFE BERLIN Fiction. By Harold Nebenzal Overlook Press. $21.95 The year is 1943 and an immigrant in Germany is writing about the decadence that defined Berlin after dark in the late 1930s, leading up to World War II and the Nazi nightmare. A nightclub is the focal point of the drama, the debauched melting pot for storm troopers, strippers and pseudonymous spies. Sound familiar? Sound like good roles for Joel Grey and Liza Minnelli? The similarity to the Academy Award-winning film Cabaret, which was based on Christopher Isherwood's Goodbye to Berlin, is not coincidental.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Starting a business is complicated, but there is support for entrepreneurs. And advice can come even from unusual sources. Example: the ex-Navy SEAL with lessons in business leadership. Hard-core leadership lessons are taught at Entrepreneur.com by the likes of well-named Jeff Boss, a former Navy SEAL, now a business consultant. In this recent post, Boss describes the ways "a leader should show up. " That includes dressing the part, listening, and being candid. And, he says, there are no excuses: "Tired after a rough night sleep?
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1880, a band of residents here confronted City Council with complaints of street conditions that were so bad the mud was often knee-deep and potholes were the size of craters. In other accounts, the broad territory that some called the Promiseland often seemed touched by plagues. There were floods and raging fires, mosquitoes and odors from the nearby cattle yards, and streets and "shanty" homes that were poorly lit. Some improvements were made after a man named Moses G. Hepburn became West Chester's first African American councilman in 1882.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | By Ty Tagami, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Plate glass windows covered with butcher paper. Blank stucco facades where plastic letters once announced shops selling office products and car stereos. Though business isn't slowing in this bustling commercial hub, some businesses are failing. "Space available" placards listing realty company names and phone numbers have sprouted up in shopping centers throughout Montgomery Township. At the same time, many businesses still see gold in Montgomeryville, with developers of commercial space begging to get their projects approved.
NEWS
January 29, 1995 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Last year, award-winning local landscaper Robert Montgomery lost his business and had to start over after some of his major customers stopped paying their bills during the real estate recession. But 10 months after he was forced out of his nursery business and started a new one concentrating on landscaping, the resulting companies are thriving and rebuilding. The unusual split also saved the jobs of dozens of workers that otherwise might have been lost. And Wilmington Trust of Pennsylvania may recover more than expected on nearly $2 million in loans it made to Montgomery's former business, the Robert Montgomery Landscape Nursery on Route 113 in Uwchlan Township.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1994 | By Lara Wozniak, FOR THE INQUIRER
Environmentally sensitive products used to sell only in offbeat camping stores or at collectives run by volunteers in tie-dye. Those days are gone. Now, to be green - or Earth-friendly - is to be mainstream. And profitable. Dan Soskin is cashing in on the green at One World, an environmental store in Haddonfield that celebrated its first anniversary Friday, on Earth Day . "One World is a combination of The Nature Company, The Body Shop and a green store," said Soskin.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1993 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every day in the United States, an average of 2,000 new small businesses begin operations, and each day, 2,000 fail. Those hardly seem to be encouraging odds for a would-be entrepreneur. Undaunted by the data, however, 607,000 new small businesses were incorporated in fiscal 1992, a 5.4 percent increase over the previous year. That represents the first growth in business start-ups since 1986, according to the U.S. Small Business Administration. It's still a far cry from the record-breaking year of 1986, when new business incorporations totalled 702,000.
LIVING
March 16, 1993 | By Maida Odom, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Welcome to the international headquarters of Hamme Associates Inc. A step- down den of a Center City townhouse lined with shelves of books and files and outfitted with a home computer, fax machine, modem and printer. Hamme Associates has just completed its first year of operation. And it's been a successful year because this business profits from an uncertain economy, corporate downsizing, mergers and bank failures. But it wasn't planned that way, say company founders Elizabeth Ives "Robin" Hamme and D. Eugene Hamme - husband and wife, who became entrepreneurs out of necessity, not desire.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1993 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
CAFE BERLIN Fiction. By Harold Nebenzal Overlook Press. $21.95 The year is 1943 and an immigrant in Germany is writing about the decadence that defined Berlin after dark in the late 1930s, leading up to World War II and the Nazi nightmare. A nightclub is the focal point of the drama, the debauched melting pot for storm troopers, strippers and pseudonymous spies. Sound familiar? Sound like good roles for Joel Grey and Liza Minnelli? The similarity to the Academy Award-winning film Cabaret, which was based on Christopher Isherwood's Goodbye to Berlin, is not coincidental.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1992 | By Jeff Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If dismal statistics on unemployment, housing starts or business failures aren't enough to get you down, here's a new figure to add to your personal misery index: business payment performance. Dun & Bradstreet Information Services, a Murray Hill, N.J., marketer of business information, yesterday updated a gauge of the U.S. economy measuring how many companies are late paying their bills. The worst findings came from Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York. "The current picture is, quite frankly, a little bit bleak," said David T. Kresge, the vice president who runs Dun & Bradstreet's analytical operations.
NEWS
April 7, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Major says he remains confident that his Conservative Party will win the election, and win it decisively. He says he simply does not believe the British people feel it is time for a change. But the polls suggest otherwise. And with only two days left before the voting, the man who succeeded Margaret Thatcher as prime minister is sounding ever more desperate. Yesterday, seemingly trying to scare wavering supporters of the third-party Liberal Democrats into voting for him, he went so far as to equate his own political survival with that of the country as a whole.
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