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Business Plan

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NEWS
August 16, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When many entrepreneurs set up shop, they do so with a good idea and a passion for their work but without a business plan or a blueprint for growth. For those who have gotten off the ground but now need direction, the Women's Business Development Center in Philadelphia is offering an 11-week business course this fall. The Fasttrac II program boasts graduates from throughout the suburbs, including Janis von Culin, founder of Von Culin Associates in Blue Bell. "In some ways, I act as an on-call vice president of human resources," she said.
NEWS
April 17, 1986 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Eighteen residents who live near 1001 Fayette St. attended a Conshohocken Zoning Hearing Board meeting to voice their opposition to a variance sought by Charles J. Stein and Steven W. Jackman. The two men, business partners, have an agreement of sale on a house that they want to convert into an office and design studio for their graphic arts business, Type Masters Inc. The house is in a residential zone. The company is currently in Ardmore, but the two want to relocate to Conshohocken because the borough is close to King of Prussia and Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Imani, 18, delights in creating different looks with hair and makeup. She also loves animals. Put those two interests together, and you've got a career goal. She hopes to attend college as a business major. After that, if her dream comes true, she'll open a pet grooming salon. "I want to make dogs pretty," she says. Blessed with abundant energy and talent, the teenager enjoys participating in arts and crafts, playing basketball, and listening to R&B and hip-hop music in her spare time.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Two months to the day before the contract with its Transport Workers Union employees expires, SEPTA yesterday unveiled a five-year business plan it admits can't succeed without radical TWU work-rule concessions in any pact negotiated with the union. "We want to change the way we do business, change the work rules. Work rules now are economic issues," SEPTA general manager John K. Leary Jr. said. Thirty minutes after Leary made his remarks at the SEPTA board room, TWU Local 234 president Steve Brookens told the same group of reporters during a Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel press conference there's no way this will happen.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So you want to start a business? Among other things - like an idea, money and a whole lot of moxie - you should have a business plan. The plan is a formal document that fleshes out the details of a business idea. Lenders often require one before making a loan. And prospective employees might be enticed into a new venture by what they read in the plan. "You can start a business without a business plan, and a lot of people do so successfully, but the business plan is a great tool to be sure you dot all the i's and cross all the t's," said Elizabeth McCrea, who teaches courses on new ventures in the graduate school at Pennsylvania State University's Great Valley campus.
NEWS
December 26, 1997 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If there is never an economic renaissance here, it won't be for a lack of official involvement. The latest discussion of revitalization in the borough drew federal, state and local officials, as well as merchants, developers, planners and civic association representatives, all saying the same thing: Jenkintown needs a concrete plan that can be put into action. "Everybody was on the same page," said U.S. Rep. Jon D. Fox (R., Pa.), who headlined the political lineup at the session, also attended by State Rep. Lawrence H. Curry (D., Montgomery)
NEWS
August 4, 2009
In a city rife with government agencies that specialize in patronage, waste, and inefficiency, the Philadelphia Parking Authority has long stood out among the crowd. It would be hard to find anyone among its 1,000 employees who wasn't hired because of his political connections rather than professional qualifications. With a workforce and organizational chart built mainly on political agendas, it's easy to see why the day-to-day mission is obscured. So it comes as no surprise that a recent audit by City Controller Alan Butkovitz's office found that the Parking Authority is top-heavy with managers, lacks cost controls, operates without a long-range business plan, and has apparently evaded state law on bidding out large contracts.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2002 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A high school sophomore who wants to help youth, a young man seeking to promote braid stylists, and a would-be force in fashion each have been named Youth Entrepreneur of the Year by a national group. The area teenagers, Damaris Y. Walker, Michael Green, and Erica Lynn Quigley, will be honored by the National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship at New York's Marriott Marquis Hotel on Tuesday. In addition to an awards dinner, they will be treated to two nights at the hotel, and receive plaques and $1,500 each in award money.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1993 | By Jeff Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The president of J&J Snack Foods Corp., the Pennsauken maker of soft pretzels and other snacks, yesterday predicted a strong 1993 despite a 36 percent drop in earnings for the first quarter, ended Dec. 26. "We're looking for each successive quarter from this point on to be better than last year's," said Gerald B. Shreiber, speaking to several dozen shareholders at the annual stockholders' meeting in Cherry Hill. He said the drop in first-quarter earnings "was in accord with our business plan.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Keith J. Mastronardo, 24, of St. Petersburg, Fla., an Upper Merion native who was a partner in a skin-care start-up seen on reality TV, died Tuesday, March 19, in a motorcycle accident in Florida. According to the Florida Highway Patrol, Mr. Mastronardo was riding a motorcycle east on Belleair Road in Largo when he swerved to avoid hitting an animal and was thrown off the bike. Police said Mr. Mastronardo was hit by a car driven by Jerome E. Mullarkey, 77, of Clearwater. Mr. Mastronardo died from his injuries at Largo Medical Center; the driver and a passenger were unhurt.
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BUSINESS
February 1, 2016
When I first visited John Lyles and Neel Kulshreshtha three years ago, their business survival seemed a real long shot. They were two unknowns out to make a mark with an electric head shaver in a world dominated by such household names as Philips Norelco, Remington, and Braun. They're unknowns no more. Their company, South Jersey-based Skull Shaver L.L.C., has "low-seven-figures" sales, largely through Amazon.com and, increasingly, its own website, skullshaver.com, said Kulshreshtha, president and CEO. Many of those sales are of their men's shaver, the Bald Eagle, even though the women's shaver, the Butterfly, has had exposure on the nationally syndicated talk shows The Real and The Doctors . In December, Skull Shaver made its first bricks-and- mortar appearance in nearly 40 Bed Bath & Beyond stores in the United States.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Timothy Gallagher is a retired medicinal chemist who spent his career with some of the world's top pharmaceutical companies, immersed in the highly technical work of synthetic drug compounds. "I'm known for my creative problem solving," said Gallagher, 61, a longtime Harleysville resident who now lives in Maryland. "I can't sing at all. " Yet he has just made an album, coaxed out of his "I'm-not-musical" self by Songmaker Productions, a West Chester-based start-up that aims to help anyone put thoughts to music, from expressions of love and los Search results for philadelphia police - Listen Online s to celebrations of friendship and fun times.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
On the morning after the last night at Guild Hall, a crew of volunteers mopped floors while the owners held back the tears. Four months. Just four lousy, four splendid, four heartbreaking months - that's all the beautiful downtown Jenkintown brewpub lasted before Jennifer McGuire and her husband, Owen Hutchins, decided to close its doors. With breweries opening at a rate of more than one per day, it's rare to hear of one closing. In 2014, there were all of 23 failures nationwide, according to the Colorado-based Brewers Association which represents small breweries.
NEWS
November 3, 2015
A BDOULAYE Coumbassa, 40, of West Philadelphia, is owner and CEO of Abbi Print in West Philadelphia. Coumbassa, who emigrated from Guinea in 1998, started the printing company in June 2010. It offers a wide array of printing services, including binding, screen printing, press printing, regular and digital printing, and graphic-art design. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: A friend's father owned a printing shop in Guinea, and while I was in college we'd go to the shop after classes.
NEWS
October 22, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
CHAKA FATTAH JR. had connections, a name and access - and he dreamed big - a former roommate and business partner testified at Fattah's federal trial yesterday. "He had a name. His father's a congressman," Matthew Amato told a federal jury. Fattah could get in the front of lines at clubs and get hard-to-get seats at restaurants. How? "Just by saying, 'Hey, I'm Chaka Fattah Jr. Can I have a table or get in front of the line?' " Amato said. With that access, Amato testified, he thought Fattah's idea of launching a high-end luxury concierge service for "high-net-worth individuals" would be successful.
NEWS
October 13, 2015
L YNNE CUTLER, of Penn's Landing, is founder and president of Women's Opportunities Resource Center (WORC). The nonprofit helps low-income women and men get entrepreneurial training and access to business and financial resources to start businesses and become economically self-sufficient. A companion organization, the Economic Opportunities Fund (EOF), is the lending arm of WORC. Since inception, WORC has assisted 5,000 people, 85 percent of whom are low-income. It's made 543 loans totaling more than $2.2 million that created or retained 1,527 jobs.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a training program before school started last year, student employees at Rowan University's recreation center were discussing how to get more students to use the rec center. "I've always noticed from my experience that people are more motivated to engage in fitness when they have a friend or partner," said Nick Dennis, 22, of Morris County, N.J., who is graduating this fall with a bachelor's in mathematics and minor in business administration. Dennis thought about the social networks so popular on campus.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After 13 years on the road, the Moorestown Theater Company would like to build a home of its own. The nonprofit group dreams of building a new performing arts center on the site of the soon-to-be-demolished former Moorestown library. "I have not heard one person say it's a bad idea," declared company founder and promoter-in-chief Mark Morgan, whose troupe stages 14 to 16 Broadway musicals annually at churches, schools, and other venues around town. Although Moorestown contemplates using the library site for green space, parking, or additional municipal facilities, the theater company would like to lease the ground while trying to privately raise perhaps $10 million to build the performing arts center.
NEWS
August 5, 2015
AS FAITH LEADERS from across Pennsylvania, we are proud to publicly support Planned Parenthood and the essential care they provide. As providers of pastoral service in our houses of worship and faith communities, we trust Planned Parenthood to offer quality reproductive health care and educational programming, and we know that their mission and work is consistent with the teachings of our various faiths. This is just the latest political attack on women's health - and a clear cynical and coordinated effort designed to undermine this essential health-care provider.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moroccan immigrant Ali Hajjaji's business plan fills a notebook. But his back-of-a-napkin version is just a rectangle labeled "hub" and a handful of lines representing "stores" and "pick up points. " A master of cellphone repair, Hajjaji, 37, came to America in 2010 with a green card he won in the State Department's diversity lottery. He has worked for resellers and retailers, including RadioShack. Two months ago, he opened iSmartTech, his South Ninth Street shop amid the bump and bustle of the Italian Market, where broken phones are as common as cabbage.
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