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Business Plan

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NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Keith J. Mastronardo, 24, of St. Petersburg, Fla., an Upper Merion native who was a partner in a skin-care start-up seen on reality TV, died Tuesday, March 19, in a motorcycle accident in Florida. According to the Florida Highway Patrol, Mr. Mastronardo was riding a motorcycle east on Belleair Road in Largo when he swerved to avoid hitting an animal and was thrown off the bike. Police said Mr. Mastronardo was hit by a car driven by Jerome E. Mullarkey, 77, of Clearwater. Mr. Mastronardo died from his injuries at Largo Medical Center; the driver and a passenger were unhurt.
NEWS
August 16, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When many entrepreneurs set up shop, they do so with a good idea and a passion for their work but without a business plan or a blueprint for growth. For those who have gotten off the ground but now need direction, the Women's Business Development Center in Philadelphia is offering an 11-week business course this fall. The Fasttrac II program boasts graduates from throughout the suburbs, including Janis von Culin, founder of Von Culin Associates in Blue Bell. "In some ways, I act as an on-call vice president of human resources," she said.
NEWS
April 17, 1986 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Eighteen residents who live near 1001 Fayette St. attended a Conshohocken Zoning Hearing Board meeting to voice their opposition to a variance sought by Charles J. Stein and Steven W. Jackman. The two men, business partners, have an agreement of sale on a house that they want to convert into an office and design studio for their graphic arts business, Type Masters Inc. The house is in a residential zone. The company is currently in Ardmore, but the two want to relocate to Conshohocken because the borough is close to King of Prussia and Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Imani, 18, delights in creating different looks with hair and makeup. She also loves animals. Put those two interests together, and you've got a career goal. She hopes to attend college as a business major. After that, if her dream comes true, she'll open a pet grooming salon. "I want to make dogs pretty," she says. Blessed with abundant energy and talent, the teenager enjoys participating in arts and crafts, playing basketball, and listening to R&B and hip-hop music in her spare time.
NEWS
January 16, 1998 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Two months to the day before the contract with its Transport Workers Union employees expires, SEPTA yesterday unveiled a five-year business plan it admits can't succeed without radical TWU work-rule concessions in any pact negotiated with the union. "We want to change the way we do business, change the work rules. Work rules now are economic issues," SEPTA general manager John K. Leary Jr. said. Thirty minutes after Leary made his remarks at the SEPTA board room, TWU Local 234 president Steve Brookens told the same group of reporters during a Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel press conference there's no way this will happen.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So you want to start a business? Among other things - like an idea, money and a whole lot of moxie - you should have a business plan. The plan is a formal document that fleshes out the details of a business idea. Lenders often require one before making a loan. And prospective employees might be enticed into a new venture by what they read in the plan. "You can start a business without a business plan, and a lot of people do so successfully, but the business plan is a great tool to be sure you dot all the i's and cross all the t's," said Elizabeth McCrea, who teaches courses on new ventures in the graduate school at Pennsylvania State University's Great Valley campus.
NEWS
August 4, 2009
In a city rife with government agencies that specialize in patronage, waste, and inefficiency, the Philadelphia Parking Authority has long stood out among the crowd. It would be hard to find anyone among its 1,000 employees who wasn't hired because of his political connections rather than professional qualifications. With a workforce and organizational chart built mainly on political agendas, it's easy to see why the day-to-day mission is obscured. So it comes as no surprise that a recent audit by City Controller Alan Butkovitz's office found that the Parking Authority is top-heavy with managers, lacks cost controls, operates without a long-range business plan, and has apparently evaded state law on bidding out large contracts.
NEWS
December 26, 1997 | By Laura Barnhardt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If there is never an economic renaissance here, it won't be for a lack of official involvement. The latest discussion of revitalization in the borough drew federal, state and local officials, as well as merchants, developers, planners and civic association representatives, all saying the same thing: Jenkintown needs a concrete plan that can be put into action. "Everybody was on the same page," said U.S. Rep. Jon D. Fox (R., Pa.), who headlined the political lineup at the session, also attended by State Rep. Lawrence H. Curry (D., Montgomery)
BUSINESS
March 30, 2002 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A high school sophomore who wants to help youth, a young man seeking to promote braid stylists, and a would-be force in fashion each have been named Youth Entrepreneur of the Year by a national group. The area teenagers, Damaris Y. Walker, Michael Green, and Erica Lynn Quigley, will be honored by the National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship at New York's Marriott Marquis Hotel on Tuesday. In addition to an awards dinner, they will be treated to two nights at the hotel, and receive plaques and $1,500 each in award money.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1993 | By Jeff Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The president of J&J Snack Foods Corp., the Pennsauken maker of soft pretzels and other snacks, yesterday predicted a strong 1993 despite a 36 percent drop in earnings for the first quarter, ended Dec. 26. "We're looking for each successive quarter from this point on to be better than last year's," said Gerald B. Shreiber, speaking to several dozen shareholders at the annual stockholders' meeting in Cherry Hill. He said the drop in first-quarter earnings "was in accord with our business plan.
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NEWS
February 3, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
BEACH HAVEN, N.J. - Those with front-row seats for at least part of the ongoing drama of keeping the historic Surflight Theatre afloat may think they've seen this play before, too. But the directors of the beleaguered theater company - billed as "Broadway at the Beach" in this Long Beach Island town - say their latest plea to save the 450-seat venue from going out of business is now a once-and-for-all proposition, not the sky-is-falling dialogue....
NEWS
January 15, 2015
TENS OF THOUSANDS of disabled GIs have returned home from war zones in Iraq and Afghanistan to face daunting challenges ranging from post-traumatic stress disorder to lost limbs and other injuries. Getting help starting or growing a business should not be one of their challenges. Now, thanks to an anonymous donor, St. Joseph's University is lending a helping hand. In March, the university's Office of Veterans Services will launch the Veterans Entrepreneurial Jumpstart Program.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Imani, 18, delights in creating different looks with hair and makeup. She also loves animals. Put those two interests together, and you've got a career goal. She hopes to attend college as a business major. After that, if her dream comes true, she'll open a pet grooming salon. "I want to make dogs pretty," she says. Blessed with abundant energy and talent, the teenager enjoys participating in arts and crafts, playing basketball, and listening to R&B and hip-hop music in her spare time.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
As young lawyers at Pepper Hamilton L.L.P. in Philadelphia, toiling late into the night and on weekends over mergers and acquisitions and contract negotiations, Nirvana Dove and Zakiya Black realized one important thing about their profession: It is not especially conducive to maintaining a beauty regimen. "To get to a salon before they close is often difficult," Black said. And if they did manage to get weekends off, those hours were mostly spent on errands. How is a time-starved professional and/or housebound new mother supposed to get pampered, they wondered over breaks fueled by Chinese takeout.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixteen companies have expressed interest in all or part of about 200 vacant acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. They include energy companies, marine terminal operators, auto processors, and multipurpose terminal operators with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware River. The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) said Tuesday that it would evaluate the responses and make recommendations to its board, which will have the final say. Southport is three waterfront parcels: 119 acres referred to as Southport Marine Terminal; 75 acres known as Southport West Terminal; and the Pier 124 "north berth," a 1,132-foot-long finger pier.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight-and-a-half years after the judge sent him upstate, Pennsylvania's parole board sent David Downey home from Waymart State Correctional Institution , after stints at Graterford and Camp Hill , to suburban Philadelphia, and his business plan. He had been convicted of drug delivery resulting in the 2005 death of a teenage escort-service worker, Ashley Burg . She was killed by a cocaine overdose at Downey's home. Downey had been a government intelligence veteran and then turned to being a business consultant.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the fourth time in the last nine months, the troubled Chester County SPCA is looking for a new executive director. Russell "Wolf" Harper, cofounder of Justice Rescue, on Wednesday announced that he was out as interim executive director of the agency, which takes in about 5,000 stray animals a year from Chester and Delaware Counties. Pat Biswanger, board president, said that Harper's 90-day contract was nearing its end, but she would not say why the board terminated the contract before it expired.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Entrepreneurship is the risky business of starting and running businesses. Some people are naturals, but can you learn to be an entrepreneur? Yes, say some of the experts. Here's how. Thinking like an entrepreneur may not come naturally, but this brief guide to cultivating an entrepreneurial mind-set, at Entrepreneur.com, will point you in the right direction. First among writer Murray Newlands' directives is to "anticipate failure. " That might sound counterproductive. However, says Newlands, "in a study conducted by Duke University and the University of Southern California, 549 successful company founders said the most important reason for their success was their ability to learn from mistakes.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
With increased state funding and stable ridership, SEPTA officials are unveiling a five-year plan to attract more riders, repair crumbling infrastructure, and improve customer satisfaction. Having emerged from last year's doomsday scenarios into a hopeful era of what SEPTA planners call "innovation, integration, and renewal," the officials outlined Tuesday a blueprint for the future that was to be presented to the agency's board for approval in July. Meeting with transit users and supporters at SEPTA's Center City headquarters, Byron Comati, director of strategic planning, said legislative approval late last year of a $2.3 billion boost in statewide transportation funding has allowed SEPTA to plan more boldly.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Amelia Brust, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The bad news for Philadelphia bicyclists: A bike-sharing program, like ones other cities have, won't be launched here this fall, as previously hoped. The good news: Officials plan to announce Thursday that it will happen next spring. Mayor Nutter's office has chosen the contractors who will operate the fledgling system. B-Cycle, a Wisconsin-based firm that supplies bike-share systems around the nation, plans to provide 1,800 bikes and 185 stations for Philadelphia.
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