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Business Plan

BUSINESS
August 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight-and-a-half years after the judge sent him upstate, Pennsylvania's parole board sent David Downey home from Waymart State Correctional Institution , after stints at Graterford and Camp Hill , to suburban Philadelphia, and his business plan. He had been convicted of drug delivery resulting in the 2005 death of a teenage escort-service worker, Ashley Burg . She was killed by a cocaine overdose at Downey's home. Downey had been a government intelligence veteran and then turned to being a business consultant.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
With increased state funding and stable ridership, SEPTA officials are unveiling a five-year plan to attract more riders, repair crumbling infrastructure, and improve customer satisfaction. Having emerged from last year's doomsday scenarios into a hopeful era of what SEPTA planners call "innovation, integration, and renewal," the officials outlined Tuesday a blueprint for the future that was to be presented to the agency's board for approval in July. Meeting with transit users and supporters at SEPTA's Center City headquarters, Byron Comati, director of strategic planning, said legislative approval late last year of a $2.3 billion boost in statewide transportation funding has allowed SEPTA to plan more boldly.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1988 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Catalyst Energy Corp., the parent company of the firm that runs the Center City steam loop, agreed yesterday to a $202.5 million buy-out offer from the son of T. Boone Pickens, the Texas oilman and corporate takeover specialist. Thomas B. Pickens 3d signed an agreement with Catalyst, of New York, to acquire the approximately 18 million outstanding shares of Catalyst for $11.25 a share. Pickens formed a new company, Merrimac, for acquiring Catalyst's stock and taking the company private.
NEWS
November 20, 2009 | By Paul Davies
Jennifer Zoga and Liz Bales tried to follow all the right steps when they started their new business in Chestnut Hill. They put together a business plan, found a location on a busy street, and lined up the necessary financing. But they didn't count on getting kneecapped by petty Philadelphia politics. Their story is a cautionary tale for anyone who wants to start a small business in this city. Zoga and Bales, two smart moms who live in Chestnut Hill, spent a couple of years planning Good Food Market, an upscale shop that sells prepared foods and caters to other busy neighborhood families.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Tredyffrin Township mail-processing center that employs 733 will be closed and its operations consolidated in Philadelphia, but a second center in Horsham was spared in this nationwide round of cutbacks announced by the U.S. Postal Service, which faces billions of dollars in losses. One hundred forty postal facilities are slated for closure, according to a list released Thursday night by the Postal Service. An additional 89 are expected to be announced in the future. The 229 closings will eliminate 28,000 jobs and are expected to save the Postal Service $2.1 billion a year.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1994 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Woodward & Lothrop, the Washington parent of Philadelphia's John Wanamaker stores, presented its creditors with a five-year business plan that projects modest sales increases and lower expenses. The business plan, detailed in New York on Tuesday, outlines how the company intends to operate after emerging from bankruptcy. Woodward & Lothrop filed for protection from its creditors in January and expects to complete its bankruptcy reorganization in the spring.. "Overall, the business plan was well-received," Robert Mang, chairman of Woodward & Lothrop, said yesterday.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Glenn Gross and Ed Willis had been searching for an avenue to dive into the barbecue business when a "brownish-orange-colored, barn-looking building" along South Delsea Drive in Vineland, N.J., kept catching their eye. "We just kept driving by this place, looking at it and saying, 'Man, that looks like a barbecue restaurant,' " said Willis, 55, of Gloucester Township. That's where the two longtime friends opened the first Fat Jack's BBQ & Blues. The original site is now closed and their business partnership has changed, but their barbecue acclaim has spurred them to national exposure.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Growing a tree-service business that now has more than $1 million in revenue and is on the verge of something way bigger - becoming the first U.S. franchise of its kind - is not at all what Josh Skolnick had planned when he responded to a call for help four years ago. Skolnick was just doing a favor for a frantic father of young girls when the Fort Washington native responded to a request in June 2008 to take down a dead elm. Back then, trees...
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marilyn Allena values faith, Catholic education, and the quiet of country living. All three drove Allena, 54, to recently enroll her fourth-grade son and seventh-grade daughter at St. John the Baptist School in Ottsville, Bucks County. "I feel St. John's is absolutely the right school for them," Allena said. "I don't know what I would do if they said they were considering to close. " Two years ago, St. John's was indeed slated to close, one of more than four dozen schools targeted as the Archdiocese of Philadelphia sought ways to save money and consolidate shrinking schools.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The founder of I'm Shmacked, the firm that posted video of local teens drinking and partying online, says he wants to "hash it out" on live TV with Lower Merion School District officials who objected to the post. Arya Toufanian, 19, of Potomac, Md., defended his business today, saying he "was not at all upset about Lower Merion complaining. " Asked to comment on the situation, Lower Merion schools spokesman Doug Young declined to be drawn into a debate with Toufanian. "Our focus is on the safety and well-being of our students, and that's the bottom line," Young said.
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