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Business Plan

BUSINESS
August 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight-and-a-half years after the judge sent him upstate, Pennsylvania's parole board sent David Downey home from Waymart State Correctional Institution , after stints at Graterford and Camp Hill , to suburban Philadelphia, and his business plan. He had been convicted of drug delivery resulting in the 2005 death of a teenage escort-service worker, Ashley Burg . She was killed by a cocaine overdose at Downey's home. Downey had been a government intelligence veteran and then turned to being a business consultant.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1988 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Catalyst Energy Corp., the parent company of the firm that runs the Center City steam loop, agreed yesterday to a $202.5 million buy-out offer from the son of T. Boone Pickens, the Texas oilman and corporate takeover specialist. Thomas B. Pickens 3d signed an agreement with Catalyst, of New York, to acquire the approximately 18 million outstanding shares of Catalyst for $11.25 a share. Pickens formed a new company, Merrimac, for acquiring Catalyst's stock and taking the company private.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Growing a tree-service business that now has more than $1 million in revenue and is on the verge of something way bigger - becoming the first U.S. franchise of its kind - is not at all what Josh Skolnick had planned when he responded to a call for help four years ago. Skolnick was just doing a favor for a frantic father of young girls when the Fort Washington native responded to a request in June 2008 to take down a dead elm. Back then, trees...
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, fresh from the successful opening of the Barnes Foundation gallery on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway - where he was a key supporter of the foundation's move from the suburbs to the city - has now focused his financial energy on building a new history museum near Independence Mall. At a news conference Tuesday, the American Revolution Center is expected to unveil New York architect Robert A.M. Stern's design for a new Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets, and in support of the push for the museum, Lenfest will announce a $40 million challenge grant.
NEWS
November 20, 2009 | By Paul Davies
Jennifer Zoga and Liz Bales tried to follow all the right steps when they started their new business in Chestnut Hill. They put together a business plan, found a location on a busy street, and lined up the necessary financing. But they didn't count on getting kneecapped by petty Philadelphia politics. Their story is a cautionary tale for anyone who wants to start a small business in this city. Zoga and Bales, two smart moms who live in Chestnut Hill, spent a couple of years planning Good Food Market, an upscale shop that sells prepared foods and caters to other busy neighborhood families.
NEWS
November 15, 2013
D OUG BALDASARE, 29, of Rittenhouse Square, is CEO of ChargeItSpot, a startup he founded on Arch Street near 17th that enables shoppers to charge cellphones for free. The company, launched in August 2012, has phone-charging kiosks in Pennsylvania and five other states. Q: How did you come up with the idea for ChargeItSpot? A: I was with friends in Miami in 2011 and all of us had forgotten to charge our phones overnight and we were splitting up and wanted to stay in touch.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Tredyffrin Township mail-processing center that employs 733 will be closed and its operations consolidated in Philadelphia, but a second center in Horsham was spared in this nationwide round of cutbacks announced by the U.S. Postal Service, which faces billions of dollars in losses. One hundred forty postal facilities are slated for closure, according to a list released Thursday night by the Postal Service. An additional 89 are expected to be announced in the future. The 229 closings will eliminate 28,000 jobs and are expected to save the Postal Service $2.1 billion a year.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Amelia Brust, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The bad news for Philadelphia bicyclists: A bike-sharing program, like ones other cities have, won't be launched here this fall, as previously hoped. The good news: Officials plan to announce Thursday that it will happen next spring. Mayor Nutter's office has chosen the contractors who will operate the fledgling system. B-Cycle, a Wisconsin-based firm that supplies bike-share systems around the nation, plans to provide 1,800 bikes and 185 stations for Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
From afar, Burlington Island appears uninviting. There is no easy access to the uninhabited Delaware River island. A bridge connecting it to nearby Burlington City was planned but never built. There are no docks. But for 400 years, the island has been a tantalizing prize, according to historians. It was seized during a conflict between the English and the Dutch in the 1600s, settled by people of several nations, battled over in courts, and targeted for a number of failed ambitious projects.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1994 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Woodward & Lothrop, the Washington parent of Philadelphia's John Wanamaker stores, presented its creditors with a five-year business plan that projects modest sales increases and lower expenses. The business plan, detailed in New York on Tuesday, outlines how the company intends to operate after emerging from bankruptcy. Woodward & Lothrop filed for protection from its creditors in January and expects to complete its bankruptcy reorganization in the spring.. "Overall, the business plan was well-received," Robert Mang, chairman of Woodward & Lothrop, said yesterday.
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