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Business Plan

BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixteen companies have expressed interest in all or part of about 200 vacant acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. They include energy companies, marine terminal operators, auto processors, and multipurpose terminal operators with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware River. The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) said Tuesday that it would evaluate the responses and make recommendations to its board, which will have the final say. Southport is three waterfront parcels: 119 acres referred to as Southport Marine Terminal; 75 acres known as Southport West Terminal; and the Pier 124 "north berth," a 1,132-foot-long finger pier.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight-and-a-half years after the judge sent him upstate, Pennsylvania's parole board sent David Downey home from Waymart State Correctional Institution , after stints at Graterford and Camp Hill , to suburban Philadelphia, and his business plan. He had been convicted of drug delivery resulting in the 2005 death of a teenage escort-service worker, Ashley Burg . She was killed by a cocaine overdose at Downey's home. Downey had been a government intelligence veteran and then turned to being a business consultant.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
With increased state funding and stable ridership, SEPTA officials are unveiling a five-year plan to attract more riders, repair crumbling infrastructure, and improve customer satisfaction. Having emerged from last year's doomsday scenarios into a hopeful era of what SEPTA planners call "innovation, integration, and renewal," the officials outlined Tuesday a blueprint for the future that was to be presented to the agency's board for approval in July. Meeting with transit users and supporters at SEPTA's Center City headquarters, Byron Comati, director of strategic planning, said legislative approval late last year of a $2.3 billion boost in statewide transportation funding has allowed SEPTA to plan more boldly.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1988 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Catalyst Energy Corp., the parent company of the firm that runs the Center City steam loop, agreed yesterday to a $202.5 million buy-out offer from the son of T. Boone Pickens, the Texas oilman and corporate takeover specialist. Thomas B. Pickens 3d signed an agreement with Catalyst, of New York, to acquire the approximately 18 million outstanding shares of Catalyst for $11.25 a share. Pickens formed a new company, Merrimac, for acquiring Catalyst's stock and taking the company private.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
From afar, Burlington Island appears uninviting. There is no easy access to the uninhabited Delaware River island. A bridge connecting it to nearby Burlington City was planned but never built. There are no docks. But for 400 years, the island has been a tantalizing prize, according to historians. It was seized during a conflict between the English and the Dutch in the 1600s, settled by people of several nations, battled over in courts, and targeted for a number of failed ambitious projects.
NEWS
November 15, 2013
D OUG BALDASARE, 29, of Rittenhouse Square, is CEO of ChargeItSpot, a startup he founded on Arch Street near 17th that enables shoppers to charge cellphones for free. The company, launched in August 2012, has phone-charging kiosks in Pennsylvania and five other states. Q: How did you come up with the idea for ChargeItSpot? A: I was with friends in Miami in 2011 and all of us had forgotten to charge our phones overnight and we were splitting up and wanted to stay in touch.
NEWS
August 13, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
IT WASN'T a particular love of bicycling that prompted Izzat Rahman to start his business, Kayuh Bicycles, even before he graduated from Temple University. "I'd say that biking is an interest, but entrepreneurship is my passion," Rahman, 24, recently said. In 2009, Rahman, then 21, came from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to study at Temple as a transfer student. "Kayuh" means "pedal" in the Malay language. Initially, Rahman started his business in the basement of the house where he was living as an undergraduate.
NEWS
November 20, 2009 | By Paul Davies
Jennifer Zoga and Liz Bales tried to follow all the right steps when they started their new business in Chestnut Hill. They put together a business plan, found a location on a busy street, and lined up the necessary financing. But they didn't count on getting kneecapped by petty Philadelphia politics. Their story is a cautionary tale for anyone who wants to start a small business in this city. Zoga and Bales, two smart moms who live in Chestnut Hill, spent a couple of years planning Good Food Market, an upscale shop that sells prepared foods and caters to other busy neighborhood families.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1994 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Woodward & Lothrop, the Washington parent of Philadelphia's John Wanamaker stores, presented its creditors with a five-year business plan that projects modest sales increases and lower expenses. The business plan, detailed in New York on Tuesday, outlines how the company intends to operate after emerging from bankruptcy. Woodward & Lothrop filed for protection from its creditors in January and expects to complete its bankruptcy reorganization in the spring.. "Overall, the business plan was well-received," Robert Mang, chairman of Woodward & Lothrop, said yesterday.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | BY JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916 T
THE NEW, redesigned Daily News that makes its debut today is not the only newspaper in town that's looking a little different to Philadelphians. For reasons that aren't quite clear, the U.S. edition of the China Daily , which calls itself the "largest national English language newspaper of China," recently began targeting the Rittenhouse section of Center City to boost subscriptions. Rolled-up copies of the paper, some dry and yellowed from the heat, were found in recent days on front stoops along Pine and Lombard streets and nearby side streets.
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