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Business Plan

NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Amelia Brust, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The bad news for Philadelphia bicyclists: A bike-sharing program, like ones other cities have, won't be launched here this fall, as previously hoped. The good news: Officials plan to announce Thursday that it will happen next spring. Mayor Nutter's office has chosen the contractors who will operate the fledgling system. B-Cycle, a Wisconsin-based firm that supplies bike-share systems around the nation, plans to provide 1,800 bikes and 185 stations for Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
With increased state funding and stable ridership, SEPTA officials are unveiling a five-year plan to attract more riders, repair crumbling infrastructure, and improve customer satisfaction. Having emerged from last year's doomsday scenarios into a hopeful era of what SEPTA planners call "innovation, integration, and renewal," the officials outlined Tuesday a blueprint for the future that was to be presented to the agency's board for approval in July. Meeting with transit users and supporters at SEPTA's Center City headquarters, Byron Comati, director of strategic planning, said legislative approval late last year of a $2.3 billion boost in statewide transportation funding has allowed SEPTA to plan more boldly.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1988 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Catalyst Energy Corp., the parent company of the firm that runs the Center City steam loop, agreed yesterday to a $202.5 million buy-out offer from the son of T. Boone Pickens, the Texas oilman and corporate takeover specialist. Thomas B. Pickens 3d signed an agreement with Catalyst, of New York, to acquire the approximately 18 million outstanding shares of Catalyst for $11.25 a share. Pickens formed a new company, Merrimac, for acquiring Catalyst's stock and taking the company private.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Several years ago, when the Franklin Institute began visualizing an expansion, planners became captivated by the lovely symmetry they could achieve if they only had a brain. The science museum's room-size heart - and, later, its transplant successor - not only connected to contemporary quantum leaps in understanding of the human body, but had also become a beloved landmark (if the term can be applied to a severely enlarged organ). The Giant Heart is reliably instructive in matters of blood transport.
NEWS
November 20, 2009 | By Paul Davies
Jennifer Zoga and Liz Bales tried to follow all the right steps when they started their new business in Chestnut Hill. They put together a business plan, found a location on a busy street, and lined up the necessary financing. But they didn't count on getting kneecapped by petty Philadelphia politics. Their story is a cautionary tale for anyone who wants to start a small business in this city. Zoga and Bales, two smart moms who live in Chestnut Hill, spent a couple of years planning Good Food Market, an upscale shop that sells prepared foods and caters to other busy neighborhood families.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1994 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Woodward & Lothrop, the Washington parent of Philadelphia's John Wanamaker stores, presented its creditors with a five-year business plan that projects modest sales increases and lower expenses. The business plan, detailed in New York on Tuesday, outlines how the company intends to operate after emerging from bankruptcy. Woodward & Lothrop filed for protection from its creditors in January and expects to complete its bankruptcy reorganization in the spring.. "Overall, the business plan was well-received," Robert Mang, chairman of Woodward & Lothrop, said yesterday.
NEWS
February 19, 2014 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marilyn Allena values faith, Catholic education, and the quiet of country living. All three drove Allena, 54, to recently enroll her fourth-grade son and seventh-grade daughter at St. John the Baptist School in Ottsville, Bucks County. "I feel St. John's is absolutely the right school for them," Allena said. "I don't know what I would do if they said they were considering to close. " Two years ago, St. John's was indeed slated to close, one of more than four dozen schools targeted as the Archdiocese of Philadelphia sought ways to save money and consolidate shrinking schools.
FOOD
August 3, 2012 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
What is the most unlikely career choice of a onetime high school and college basketball star whose NBA career was dashed by back injuries? How about cream-puff salesman? And not the used-car kind of cream puff - which might make sense - but the cream-filled pastry ball. Which is the new vocation of Brian Zoubek, the 7-foot-1 center for Haddonfield Memorial High and the 2010 national championship Duke Blue Devils. He's seeking profit in profiteroles. This week in his hometown, Zoubek, 24, opened Dream Puffz - "the Z is for me" - a spare, modern corner storefront next to Bread Board Plus.
NEWS
November 15, 2013
D OUG BALDASARE, 29, of Rittenhouse Square, is CEO of ChargeItSpot, a startup he founded on Arch Street near 17th that enables shoppers to charge cellphones for free. The company, launched in August 2012, has phone-charging kiosks in Pennsylvania and five other states. Q: How did you come up with the idea for ChargeItSpot? A: I was with friends in Miami in 2011 and all of us had forgotten to charge our phones overnight and we were splitting up and wanted to stay in touch.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Wearing a T-shirt with the laid-back message "Poop Happens" and a wrist tattoo made of paw prints and a heart, Amy Parsons seems the picture of whimsy - until she details her lows as a small-business owner. Those include losing her family's four-bedroom Cape Cod in East Whiteland Township to foreclosure 2 1/2 years ago and the 20 percent drop in business experienced by the dog-day-care portion of her multifaceted Canine Creature Comforts in Malvern. The latter came about a year after the recession hit. Parsons started losing customers as layoffs wiped out their income - and thus the need for someone to watch their pets.
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