CollectionsBusiness Plan
IN THE NEWS

Business Plan

NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Keith J. Mastronardo, 24, of St. Petersburg, Fla., an Upper Merion native who was a partner in a skin-care start-up seen on reality TV, died Tuesday, March 19, in a motorcycle accident in Florida. According to the Florida Highway Patrol, Mr. Mastronardo was riding a motorcycle east on Belleair Road in Largo when he swerved to avoid hitting an animal and was thrown off the bike. Police said Mr. Mastronardo was hit by a car driven by Jerome E. Mullarkey, 77, of Clearwater. Mr. Mastronardo died from his injuries at Largo Medical Center; the driver and a passenger were unhurt.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Timothy Gallagher is a retired medicinal chemist who spent his career with some of the world's top pharmaceutical companies, immersed in the highly technical work of synthetic drug compounds. "I'm known for my creative problem solving," said Gallagher, 61, a longtime Harleysville resident who now lives in Maryland. "I can't sing at all. " Yet he has just made an album, coaxed out of his "I'm-not-musical" self by Songmaker Productions, a West Chester-based start-up that aims to help anyone put thoughts to music, from expressions of love and los Search results for philadelphia police - Listen Online s to celebrations of friendship and fun times.
NEWS
October 13, 2015
L YNNE CUTLER, of Penn's Landing, is founder and president of Women's Opportunities Resource Center (WORC). The nonprofit helps low-income women and men get entrepreneurial training and access to business and financial resources to start businesses and become economically self-sufficient. A companion organization, the Economic Opportunities Fund (EOF), is the lending arm of WORC. Since inception, WORC has assisted 5,000 people, 85 percent of whom are low-income. It's made 543 loans totaling more than $2.2 million that created or retained 1,527 jobs.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2016
When I first visited John Lyles and Neel Kulshreshtha three years ago, their business survival seemed a real long shot. They were two unknowns out to make a mark with an electric head shaver in a world dominated by such household names as Philips Norelco, Remington, and Braun. They're unknowns no more. Their company, South Jersey-based Skull Shaver L.L.C., has "low-seven-figures" sales, largely through Amazon.com and, increasingly, its own website, skullshaver.com, said Kulshreshtha, president and CEO. Many of those sales are of their men's shaver, the Bald Eagle, even though the women's shaver, the Butterfly, has had exposure on the nationally syndicated talk shows The Real and The Doctors . In December, Skull Shaver made its first bricks-and- mortar appearance in nearly 40 Bed Bath & Beyond stores in the United States.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1988 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Catalyst Energy Corp., the parent company of the firm that runs the Center City steam loop, agreed yesterday to a $202.5 million buy-out offer from the son of T. Boone Pickens, the Texas oilman and corporate takeover specialist. Thomas B. Pickens 3d signed an agreement with Catalyst, of New York, to acquire the approximately 18 million outstanding shares of Catalyst for $11.25 a share. Pickens formed a new company, Merrimac, for acquiring Catalyst's stock and taking the company private.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight-and-a-half years after the judge sent him upstate, Pennsylvania's parole board sent David Downey home from Waymart State Correctional Institution , after stints at Graterford and Camp Hill , to suburban Philadelphia, and his business plan. He had been convicted of drug delivery resulting in the 2005 death of a teenage escort-service worker, Ashley Burg . She was killed by a cocaine overdose at Downey's home. Downey had been a government intelligence veteran and then turned to being a business consultant.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
On the morning after the last night at Guild Hall, a crew of volunteers mopped floors while the owners held back the tears. Four months. Just four lousy, four splendid, four heartbreaking months - that's all the beautiful downtown Jenkintown brewpub lasted before Jennifer McGuire and her husband, Owen Hutchins, decided to close its doors. With breweries opening at a rate of more than one per day, it's rare to hear of one closing. In 2014, there were all of 23 failures nationwide, according to the Colorado-based Brewers Association which represents small breweries.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
From afar, Burlington Island appears uninviting. There is no easy access to the uninhabited Delaware River island. A bridge connecting it to nearby Burlington City was planned but never built. There are no docks. But for 400 years, the island has been a tantalizing prize, according to historians. It was seized during a conflict between the English and the Dutch in the 1600s, settled by people of several nations, battled over in courts, and targeted for a number of failed ambitious projects.
NEWS
November 20, 2009 | By Paul Davies
Jennifer Zoga and Liz Bales tried to follow all the right steps when they started their new business in Chestnut Hill. They put together a business plan, found a location on a busy street, and lined up the necessary financing. But they didn't count on getting kneecapped by petty Philadelphia politics. Their story is a cautionary tale for anyone who wants to start a small business in this city. Zoga and Bales, two smart moms who live in Chestnut Hill, spent a couple of years planning Good Food Market, an upscale shop that sells prepared foods and caters to other busy neighborhood families.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixteen companies have expressed interest in all or part of about 200 vacant acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. They include energy companies, marine terminal operators, auto processors, and multipurpose terminal operators with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware River. The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) said Tuesday that it would evaluate the responses and make recommendations to its board, which will have the final say. Southport is three waterfront parcels: 119 acres referred to as Southport Marine Terminal; 75 acres known as Southport West Terminal; and the Pier 124 "north berth," a 1,132-foot-long finger pier.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|