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Business Plan

NEWS
May 8, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Individuals who have lost their jobs, and who live in Philadelphia and the four Pennsylvania suburban counties, are eligible for a free business- applications computer-training program sponsored by the Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition. "What we're finding is that people can be motivated, but if they don't have computer skills, they don't have an asset," said Ronald Spangler, director of training at the Berkeley Education and Training Center. Individually tailored skills training will be offered in areas including computer literacy and specific programs.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight-and-a-half years after the judge sent him upstate, Pennsylvania's parole board sent David Downey home from Waymart State Correctional Institution , after stints at Graterford and Camp Hill , to suburban Philadelphia, and his business plan. He had been convicted of drug delivery resulting in the 2005 death of a teenage escort-service worker, Ashley Burg . She was killed by a cocaine overdose at Downey's home. Downey had been a government intelligence veteran and then turned to being a business consultant.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"ROB the Mob" is an intriguing little indie about a New York "Bonnie and Clyde" who had an understandably brief career knocking down mafia social clubs, circa 1992. Theirs was a very bad business plan, but in "Rob the Mob" it acquires a certain appeal - their victims are so deserving, their demeanor so pleasant, their methods so amateurish, that the doomed enterprise (in the hands of "City Lights" director Raymond De Felitta) takes on an agreeably quixotic tone. Tommy (Michael Pitt)
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph A. LaSala of Media has been elected chairman of the Delaware County Economic Development Oversight Board, which was established by the County Council to implement and supervise economic development activities and initiatives. LaSala, vice president for marketing and government affairs at Day & Zimmermann Inc. of Philadelphia, was chosen to head the five-member board at a reorganization meeting on Feb. 22. LaSala is a member of the Delaware County Industrial Development Authority and has been deputy regional administrator for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
SPORTS
June 3, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The already uncertain future of the Winnipeg Jets grew more clouded yesterday when a group went to court in an attempt to block construction of a new arena. Thin Ice filed a motion with Court of Queen's Bench that aims to force public consultation before $110 million of public money goes into a new hockey facility. The motion claims the city broke its own zoning bylaws when it approved the arena site. "This speaks to the fact that the process all the way along has taken place behind closed doors, in secret, without any public consultation," said spokesman Jim Silver, a university professor.
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
The Board of Education gave a reprieve yesterday to the Center for Economics and Law Charter School yesterday, despite lingering questions about the school's own economics. The board, by a 6-2 vote, gave the school permission to finish this year, seven weeks after the school was on the verge of being the first charter school in the state to lose its charter. The board also agreed to extend the school's charter through August 2002, provided it submits a business plan by June 30. The School District had threatened in November to revoke the school's charter after three of the school's certified teachers quit the staff of 11 educators, and the city shut down the school because of unsafe conditions.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Tredyffrin Township mail-processing center that employs 733 will be closed and its operations consolidated in Philadelphia, but a second center in Horsham was spared in this nationwide round of cutbacks announced by the U.S. Postal Service, which faces billions of dollars in losses. One hundred forty postal facilities are slated for closure, according to a list released Thursday night by the Postal Service. An additional 89 are expected to be announced in the future. The 229 closings will eliminate 28,000 jobs and are expected to save the Postal Service $2.1 billion a year.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Growing a tree-service business that now has more than $1 million in revenue and is on the verge of something way bigger - becoming the first U.S. franchise of its kind - is not at all what Josh Skolnick had planned when he responded to a call for help four years ago. Skolnick was just doing a favor for a frantic father of young girls when the Fort Washington native responded to a request in June 2008 to take down a dead elm. Back then, trees...
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, fresh from the successful opening of the Barnes Foundation gallery on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway - where he was a key supporter of the foundation's move from the suburbs to the city - has now focused his financial energy on building a new history museum near Independence Mall. At a news conference Tuesday, the American Revolution Center is expected to unveil New York architect Robert A.M. Stern's design for a new Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets, and in support of the push for the museum, Lenfest will announce a $40 million challenge grant.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | Diane Mastrull
Already in a position that seemed far too much to ask of a woman six months' pregnant, Liz Cahill maneuvered from her upside down "V" pose to another ridiculously tough configuration known as an extended fire hydrant. While still face down and gripping a bar in front of her, Cahill turned her belly to the right and thrust her right leg up and out to resemble a dog doing its business. A very pregnant dog. Perhaps crazier still, Cahill, 30, and her also-pregnant sister, Carrie Rorer, 34, who was similarly contorted alongside her, were each paying for this hour of sweating, panting and manipulation — $400 for a 10-session package.
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