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Business Plan

BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Tredyffrin Township mail-processing center that employs 733 will be closed and its operations consolidated in Philadelphia, but a second center in Horsham was spared in this nationwide round of cutbacks announced by the U.S. Postal Service, which faces billions of dollars in losses. One hundred forty postal facilities are slated for closure, according to a list released Thursday night by the Postal Service. An additional 89 are expected to be announced in the future. The 229 closings will eliminate 28,000 jobs and are expected to save the Postal Service $2.1 billion a year.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2009 | Compiled from The Inquirer, Associated Press, Bloomberg News
"I believe that our membership understands. They get it. " - Ray Wood, union president at a Toledo, Ohio, transmission factory, on contract concessions at General Motors Corp. "Major deficit spending, inflationary pressures with the weak dollar, no signs anyone wants to stop spending, on top of the greatest financial crises in modern history. " - Brian Edmonds, head of interest rates in New York at Cantor Fitzgerald L.P., on reasons U.S. bond yields rose "The worst of it is probably coming to an end. " - Stephen King, chief economist at HSBC Holdings P.L.C.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | Daily News wire services
Startup training program to begin on Jan. 29 Interested in starting a business? The Enterprise Center will begin its "StartUp" entrepreneurial training program Jan. 29. This is an intermediate-level course that helps participants develop their business plan, including financial projections. Deadline for early registration is Jan. 7. Call 215-895-4012 or 215-895-4019. Or visit the Web site at www.theenterprisecenter.com. Study: Women missing from companies' boards A study by the Forum of Executive Women shows a "significant lack" of women on the boards of directors of the area's largest companies.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1996 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, Judith Cills was too busy running her business to keep up with the details of running her business. She had no computer. Receipts were stashed in shopping bags. A business plan was nowhere to be found. These things couldn't work their way into the 18-hour days she put into running her Ten Eleven Clinton Bed & Breakfast in Society Hill. She spent her days darting between the two adjacent 19th century buildings that house her bed and breakfast, fluffing the floral pillows in the English Studio apartment, freshening the flowers in the Green apartment and stocking milk, juice and breakfast pastries for each guest.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
R.H. Macy & Co. said yesterday that it planned to slash advertising and take other cost-cutting actions as part of a five-year recovery plan for the retailer, now operating under Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. With the savings and a top-to-bottom revamping of its merchandising effort, executives of the world-famous New York retailer said, Macy's projects that it will have earnings of $811 million before taxes and other expenses by fiscal year 1998. The company, which has already closed eight department stores and more than 60 specialty stores this year, did not say whether it planned to shut any more branches.
NEWS
May 15, 1986 | By JUAN GONZALEZ, Daily News Staff Writer
Although most city officials defend the spending of nearly a quarter- million dollars on now-abandoned plans for a new municipal computer agency, several top city data-processing employees contend that most of the money was wasted. And the man who now heads the city's computer agency, Deputy Finance Director Eugene L. Cliett Jr., says his predecessor left him with "no business plan to speak of" despite a $75,000 contract calling for such a plan. During the past 14 months the city Finance Department, on orders from former Finance Director Richard G. Gilmore, signed four separate private consulting contracts to help transform the city's old Office of Information Management into the Philadelphia Computing Corp.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | by Shantee' Woodards, Daily News Staff Writer
Future entrepreneurs of Philadelphia need your help. After three weeks of learning how to create their own businesses, student groups from the Summer Youth Work Experience will demonstrate their skills by selling products at today's Black Family Reunion at Memorial Hall in Fairmount Park. But they need your money to succeed. "We want to encourage them to learn the skills to start a business and use them positively," said Curtis Jones Jr., president and CEO of the Philadelphia Commercial Development Corp.
REAL_ESTATE
October 7, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Developer Ken Weinstein has a knack for finding opportunities in places where others see none. Upper Darby and Norristown, to name two suburban locations, as well as city neighborhoods. In 2009, Philadelphia-based Weinstein and business partner Stan Smith paid $1.1 million for the 84,000-square-foot former Verizon Corp. building across from the Upper Darby Township building. They rehabbed it for offices as 7200 Chestnut. In Norristown, Weinstein's firm, PhillyOfficeRetail, is completing work at 317 Swede St., across from the Montgomery County Courthouse, and commercial space at 401 DeKalb St., in the county seat's reemerging business district.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | Diane Mastrull
Already in a position that seemed far too much to ask of a woman six months' pregnant, Liz Cahill maneuvered from her upside down "V" pose to another ridiculously tough configuration known as an extended fire hydrant. While still face down and gripping a bar in front of her, Cahill turned her belly to the right and thrust her right leg up and out to resemble a dog doing its business. A very pregnant dog. Perhaps crazier still, Cahill, 30, and her also-pregnant sister, Carrie Rorer, 34, who was similarly contorted alongside her, were each paying for this hour of sweating, panting and manipulation — $400 for a 10-session package.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Glenn Gross and Ed Willis had been searching for an avenue to dive into the barbecue business when a "brownish-orange-colored, barn-looking building" along South Delsea Drive in Vineland, N.J., kept catching their eye. "We just kept driving by this place, looking at it and saying, 'Man, that looks like a barbecue restaurant,' " said Willis, 55, of Gloucester Township. That's where the two longtime friends opened the first Fat Jack's BBQ & Blues. The original site is now closed and their business partnership has changed, but their barbecue acclaim has spurred them to national exposure.
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