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Business Plan

NEWS
October 2, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Small businesses take center stage this month, with three seminars scheduled. Topics on starting them, obtaining financing for them, and related topics. Tomorrow, the U.S. House of Representatives' Small Business Committee will hold a seminar at Beaver College to examine the progress made in increasing opportunities for small businesses owned by women. The program will begin at 9:30 a.m. at the college's Grey Towers Castle, Church Road and Limekiln Pike, Glenside. For more information, call Connie Williams at U.S. Rep. Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky's office, 610-667-3666.
NEWS
May 13, 2007 | By Ed Mahon FOR THE INQUIRER
During an unofficial competition last year, Upper Darby High School's robot took a hit, then another. Then the battery flew out. Garrett Sapsis, 16, working in the pit crew, had about five minutes to come up with a temporary solution, "a heavy big metal piece of junk" to hold the battery in place. "It was a like a cage, but it worked," said Sapsis, a junior at Upper Darby and member of the school's Robotics club. But the cage weighed around three pounds, too much for an official competition in which every ounce counts and the robot can't pass 120 pounds.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | BY JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916 T
THE NEW, redesigned Daily News that makes its debut today is not the only newspaper in town that's looking a little different to Philadelphians. For reasons that aren't quite clear, the U.S. edition of the China Daily , which calls itself the "largest national English language newspaper of China," recently began targeting the Rittenhouse section of Center City to boost subscriptions. Rolled-up copies of the paper, some dry and yellowed from the heat, were found in recent days on front stoops along Pine and Lombard streets and nearby side streets.
FOOD
August 3, 2012 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
What is the most unlikely career choice of a onetime high school and college basketball star whose NBA career was dashed by back injuries? How about cream-puff salesman? And not the used-car kind of cream puff - which might make sense - but the cream-filled pastry ball. Which is the new vocation of Brian Zoubek, the 7-foot-1 center for Haddonfield Memorial High and the 2010 national championship Duke Blue Devils. He's seeking profit in profiteroles. This week in his hometown, Zoubek, 24, opened Dream Puffz - "the Z is for me" - a spare, modern corner storefront next to Bread Board Plus.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1986 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Some of the region's most successful entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and lawyers will gather Nov. 14 and 15 at the Sheraton Society Hill Hotel for a workshop to tell others how to start and finance a new business. The event, called the Greater Philadelphia Entrepreneurs Exchange, will bring together Willard Rouse, president of Rouse & Associates, a real estate development firm; Thomas A. Penn, president of Genesis Seed Fund, a Malvern- based venture capital fund, and Peter Sears, president of SR One Ltd., a venture capital firm that is a subsidiary of SmithKline Beckman.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
The eyes simply couldn't ignore Ameet Shah's toes. They were just so unexpected in the all-business, nothing-out-of-place office of Anthony DiFabio, chief executive officer of Robins' Nest Inc., a Glassboro nonprofit organization that helps troubled children and their families in South Jersey. And they were so obvious. Shah was wearing flip-flops - odd attire for a company executive such as himself, and yet his year-round footwear choice unless a client objects. DiFabio wasn't objecting - he was too busy raving about the services Robins' Nest is getting from Conigent, the Haddonfield-based technology-consulting company Shah formed in 2007.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Individuals who have lost their jobs, and who live in Philadelphia and the four Pennsylvania suburban counties, are eligible for a free business- applications computer-training program sponsored by the Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition. "What we're finding is that people can be motivated, but if they don't have computer skills, they don't have an asset," said Ronald Spangler, director of training at the Berkeley Education and Training Center. Individually tailored skills training will be offered in areas including computer literacy and specific programs.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph A. LaSala of Media has been elected chairman of the Delaware County Economic Development Oversight Board, which was established by the County Council to implement and supervise economic development activities and initiatives. LaSala, vice president for marketing and government affairs at Day & Zimmermann Inc. of Philadelphia, was chosen to head the five-member board at a reorganization meeting on Feb. 22. LaSala is a member of the Delaware County Industrial Development Authority and has been deputy regional administrator for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
SPORTS
June 3, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The already uncertain future of the Winnipeg Jets grew more clouded yesterday when a group went to court in an attempt to block construction of a new arena. Thin Ice filed a motion with Court of Queen's Bench that aims to force public consultation before $110 million of public money goes into a new hockey facility. The motion claims the city broke its own zoning bylaws when it approved the arena site. "This speaks to the fact that the process all the way along has taken place behind closed doors, in secret, without any public consultation," said spokesman Jim Silver, a university professor.
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
The Board of Education gave a reprieve yesterday to the Center for Economics and Law Charter School yesterday, despite lingering questions about the school's own economics. The board, by a 6-2 vote, gave the school permission to finish this year, seven weeks after the school was on the verge of being the first charter school in the state to lose its charter. The board also agreed to extend the school's charter through August 2002, provided it submits a business plan by June 30. The School District had threatened in November to revoke the school's charter after three of the school's certified teachers quit the staff of 11 educators, and the city shut down the school because of unsafe conditions.
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