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Business Plan

NEWS
May 13, 2007 | By Ed Mahon FOR THE INQUIRER
During an unofficial competition last year, Upper Darby High School's robot took a hit, then another. Then the battery flew out. Garrett Sapsis, 16, working in the pit crew, had about five minutes to come up with a temporary solution, "a heavy big metal piece of junk" to hold the battery in place. "It was a like a cage, but it worked," said Sapsis, a junior at Upper Darby and member of the school's Robotics club. But the cage weighed around three pounds, too much for an official competition in which every ounce counts and the robot can't pass 120 pounds.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1986 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Some of the region's most successful entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and lawyers will gather Nov. 14 and 15 at the Sheraton Society Hill Hotel for a workshop to tell others how to start and finance a new business. The event, called the Greater Philadelphia Entrepreneurs Exchange, will bring together Willard Rouse, president of Rouse & Associates, a real estate development firm; Thomas A. Penn, president of Genesis Seed Fund, a Malvern- based venture capital fund, and Peter Sears, president of SR One Ltd., a venture capital firm that is a subsidiary of SmithKline Beckman.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
As young lawyers at Pepper Hamilton L.L.P. in Philadelphia, toiling late into the night and on weekends over mergers and acquisitions and contract negotiations, Nirvana Dove and Zakiya Black realized one important thing about their profession: It is not especially conducive to maintaining a beauty regimen. "To get to a salon before they close is often difficult," Black said. And if they did manage to get weekends off, those hours were mostly spent on errands. How is a time-starved professional and/or housebound new mother supposed to get pampered, they wondered over breaks fueled by Chinese takeout.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Individuals who have lost their jobs, and who live in Philadelphia and the four Pennsylvania suburban counties, are eligible for a free business- applications computer-training program sponsored by the Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition. "What we're finding is that people can be motivated, but if they don't have computer skills, they don't have an asset," said Ronald Spangler, director of training at the Berkeley Education and Training Center. Individually tailored skills training will be offered in areas including computer literacy and specific programs.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixteen companies have expressed interest in all or part of about 200 vacant acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. They include energy companies, marine terminal operators, auto processors, and multipurpose terminal operators with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware River. The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) said Tuesday that it would evaluate the responses and make recommendations to its board, which will have the final say. Southport is three waterfront parcels: 119 acres referred to as Southport Marine Terminal; 75 acres known as Southport West Terminal; and the Pier 124 "north berth," a 1,132-foot-long finger pier.
NEWS
August 13, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
IT WASN'T a particular love of bicycling that prompted Izzat Rahman to start his business, Kayuh Bicycles, even before he graduated from Temple University. "I'd say that biking is an interest, but entrepreneurship is my passion," Rahman, 24, recently said. In 2009, Rahman, then 21, came from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to study at Temple as a transfer student. "Kayuh" means "pedal" in the Malay language. Initially, Rahman started his business in the basement of the house where he was living as an undergraduate.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph A. LaSala of Media has been elected chairman of the Delaware County Economic Development Oversight Board, which was established by the County Council to implement and supervise economic development activities and initiatives. LaSala, vice president for marketing and government affairs at Day & Zimmermann Inc. of Philadelphia, was chosen to head the five-member board at a reorganization meeting on Feb. 22. LaSala is a member of the Delaware County Industrial Development Authority and has been deputy regional administrator for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.
SPORTS
June 3, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The already uncertain future of the Winnipeg Jets grew more clouded yesterday when a group went to court in an attempt to block construction of a new arena. Thin Ice filed a motion with Court of Queen's Bench that aims to force public consultation before $110 million of public money goes into a new hockey facility. The motion claims the city broke its own zoning bylaws when it approved the arena site. "This speaks to the fact that the process all the way along has taken place behind closed doors, in secret, without any public consultation," said spokesman Jim Silver, a university professor.
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
The Board of Education gave a reprieve yesterday to the Center for Economics and Law Charter School yesterday, despite lingering questions about the school's own economics. The board, by a 6-2 vote, gave the school permission to finish this year, seven weeks after the school was on the verge of being the first charter school in the state to lose its charter. The board also agreed to extend the school's charter through August 2002, provided it submits a business plan by June 30. The School District had threatened in November to revoke the school's charter after three of the school's certified teachers quit the staff of 11 educators, and the city shut down the school because of unsafe conditions.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Tredyffrin Township mail-processing center that employs 733 will be closed and its operations consolidated in Philadelphia, but a second center in Horsham was spared in this nationwide round of cutbacks announced by the U.S. Postal Service, which faces billions of dollars in losses. One hundred forty postal facilities are slated for closure, according to a list released Thursday night by the Postal Service. An additional 89 are expected to be announced in the future. The 229 closings will eliminate 28,000 jobs and are expected to save the Postal Service $2.1 billion a year.
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