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Business Plan

NEWS
January 12, 1999 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
The Board of Education gave a reprieve yesterday to the Center for Economics and Law Charter School yesterday, despite lingering questions about the school's own economics. The board, by a 6-2 vote, gave the school permission to finish this year, seven weeks after the school was on the verge of being the first charter school in the state to lose its charter. The board also agreed to extend the school's charter through August 2002, provided it submits a business plan by June 30. The School District had threatened in November to revoke the school's charter after three of the school's certified teachers quit the staff of 11 educators, and the city shut down the school because of unsafe conditions.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2009 | Compiled from The Inquirer, Associated Press, Bloomberg News
"I believe that our membership understands. They get it. " - Ray Wood, union president at a Toledo, Ohio, transmission factory, on contract concessions at General Motors Corp. "Major deficit spending, inflationary pressures with the weak dollar, no signs anyone wants to stop spending, on top of the greatest financial crises in modern history. " - Brian Edmonds, head of interest rates in New York at Cantor Fitzgerald L.P., on reasons U.S. bond yields rose "The worst of it is probably coming to an end. " - Stephen King, chief economist at HSBC Holdings P.L.C.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | Daily News wire services
Startup training program to begin on Jan. 29 Interested in starting a business? The Enterprise Center will begin its "StartUp" entrepreneurial training program Jan. 29. This is an intermediate-level course that helps participants develop their business plan, including financial projections. Deadline for early registration is Jan. 7. Call 215-895-4012 or 215-895-4019. Or visit the Web site at www.theenterprisecenter.com. Study: Women missing from companies' boards A study by the Forum of Executive Women shows a "significant lack" of women on the boards of directors of the area's largest companies.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1996 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, Judith Cills was too busy running her business to keep up with the details of running her business. She had no computer. Receipts were stashed in shopping bags. A business plan was nowhere to be found. These things couldn't work their way into the 18-hour days she put into running her Ten Eleven Clinton Bed & Breakfast in Society Hill. She spent her days darting between the two adjacent 19th century buildings that house her bed and breakfast, fluffing the floral pillows in the English Studio apartment, freshening the flowers in the Green apartment and stocking milk, juice and breakfast pastries for each guest.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1992 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
R.H. Macy & Co. said yesterday that it planned to slash advertising and take other cost-cutting actions as part of a five-year recovery plan for the retailer, now operating under Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. With the savings and a top-to-bottom revamping of its merchandising effort, executives of the world-famous New York retailer said, Macy's projects that it will have earnings of $811 million before taxes and other expenses by fiscal year 1998. The company, which has already closed eight department stores and more than 60 specialty stores this year, did not say whether it planned to shut any more branches.
NEWS
May 15, 1986 | By JUAN GONZALEZ, Daily News Staff Writer
Although most city officials defend the spending of nearly a quarter- million dollars on now-abandoned plans for a new municipal computer agency, several top city data-processing employees contend that most of the money was wasted. And the man who now heads the city's computer agency, Deputy Finance Director Eugene L. Cliett Jr., says his predecessor left him with "no business plan to speak of" despite a $75,000 contract calling for such a plan. During the past 14 months the city Finance Department, on orders from former Finance Director Richard G. Gilmore, signed four separate private consulting contracts to help transform the city's old Office of Information Management into the Philadelphia Computing Corp.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | by Shantee' Woodards, Daily News Staff Writer
Future entrepreneurs of Philadelphia need your help. After three weeks of learning how to create their own businesses, student groups from the Summer Youth Work Experience will demonstrate their skills by selling products at today's Black Family Reunion at Memorial Hall in Fairmount Park. But they need your money to succeed. "We want to encourage them to learn the skills to start a business and use them positively," said Curtis Jones Jr., president and CEO of the Philadelphia Commercial Development Corp.
REAL_ESTATE
October 7, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Developer Ken Weinstein has a knack for finding opportunities in places where others see none. Upper Darby and Norristown, to name two suburban locations, as well as city neighborhoods. In 2009, Philadelphia-based Weinstein and business partner Stan Smith paid $1.1 million for the 84,000-square-foot former Verizon Corp. building across from the Upper Darby Township building. They rehabbed it for offices as 7200 Chestnut. In Norristown, Weinstein's firm, PhillyOfficeRetail, is completing work at 317 Swede St., across from the Montgomery County Courthouse, and commercial space at 401 DeKalb St., in the county seat's reemerging business district.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, fresh from the successful opening of the Barnes Foundation gallery on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway - where he was a key supporter of the foundation's move from the suburbs to the city - has now focused his financial energy on building a new history museum near Independence Mall. At a news conference Tuesday, the American Revolution Center is expected to unveil New York architect Robert A.M. Stern's design for a new Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets, and in support of the push for the museum, Lenfest will announce a $40 million challenge grant.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Batteries may have drained Roy Abbate's savings, but they recharged his career and his life, too. "There's no age limit to when you can learn something new," says Abbate, who was over 50 and unemployed when he sank his entire 401(k) into a Batteries Plus store in Mount Laurel. "I had about $500,000. It was everything," he recalls. "I was scared. But my kids were grown, and I thought, 'If it doesn't pan out, the only person I would hurt is myself.' " Two-and-a-half years later, the affable Cherry Hill resident is charged up and ready to go, just like everything else on the sales floor of his Route 73 store.
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