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Business Plan

BUSINESS
September 12, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Like any good son, Fred Allegrezza wanted to make life easier for his mother. Unlike most sons with magnanimous ambitions, Allegrezza's actually led to a business - one aimed at helping the AARP generation turn on and tune in. To the Internet, that is. Allegrezza's business plan has a financial and a social bottom line - build profit and make isolation a less pervasive part of growing old. At the center of his entrepreneurial endeavor...
BUSINESS
August 29, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Chuck Matasic gently squeezed the trigger, releasing an arrow that streaked across the warehouse at 330 feet per second before piercing the center of a bottle cap. His target was just eight yards away, the demonstration of his crossbow's accuracy limited by the size of his company's tight headquarters near West Chester. Matasic offered assurances that he would have achieved the same dead-on results from 40 yards out. Hitting his business target might not be as easy. His plan is to take his crossbow-manufacturing company, Kodabow, which made its first sale about a year ago, from relative obscurity to sales of $30 million to $40 million within five years.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Wearing a T-shirt with the laid-back message "Poop Happens" and a wrist tattoo made of paw prints and a heart, Amy Parsons seems the picture of whimsy - until she details her lows as a small-business owner. Those include losing her family's four-bedroom Cape Cod in East Whiteland Township to foreclosure 2 1/2 years ago and the 20 percent drop in business experienced by the dog-day-care portion of her multifaceted Canine Creature Comforts in Malvern. The latter came about a year after the recession hit. Parsons started losing customers as layoffs wiped out their income - and thus the need for someone to watch their pets.
NEWS
August 11, 2011 | By Tracie Mauriello, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
HARRISBURG - The state's ill-fated venture into wine vending machines might never have been uncorked if the Liquor Control Board had listened to its own evaluation panel's warnings in 2008. So say copies of documents distributed Wednesday by state House Majority Leader Mike Turzai, who is pushing to privatize the liquor board. According to the records handed out by Turzai's office, an LCB evaluation committee recommended in July 2008 that the board not enter into a contract with Conshohocken-based Simple Brands, the company proposing to supply the wine kiosks.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Mohamed Ali Niang will skip his Aug. 26 graduation from Temple University. The budding entrepreneur, 23, will be busy trying to lift a West African country out of abject poverty and to save lives. In the process, Niang said, he hopes the rice-processing and rice-distribution business he traveled to Mali this weekend to start will make him "a rock star. " But not in a pile-of-money, limousines-and-swooning-young-women kind of way. Niang said he would consider himself rich if Malians stop dying from malnutrition, a condition said to claim one child every 10 minutes in the beleaguered country of more than 14 million people, where his parents were born.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
The eyes simply couldn't ignore Ameet Shah's toes. They were just so unexpected in the all-business, nothing-out-of-place office of Anthony DiFabio, chief executive officer of Robins' Nest Inc., a Glassboro nonprofit organization that helps troubled children and their families in South Jersey. And they were so obvious. Shah was wearing flip-flops - odd attire for a company executive such as himself, and yet his year-round footwear choice unless a client objects. DiFabio wasn't objecting - he was too busy raving about the services Robins' Nest is getting from Conigent, the Haddonfield-based technology-consulting company Shah formed in 2007.
NEWS
July 25, 2011 | BY JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916 T
THE NEW, redesigned Daily News that makes its debut today is not the only newspaper in town that's looking a little different to Philadelphians. For reasons that aren't quite clear, the U.S. edition of the China Daily , which calls itself the "largest national English language newspaper of China," recently began targeting the Rittenhouse section of Center City to boost subscriptions. Rolled-up copies of the paper, some dry and yellowed from the heat, were found in recent days on front stoops along Pine and Lombard streets and nearby side streets.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Can you miss something you never really had? The Associated Press reported over the weekend that South Korean electric-vehicle maker CT&T Co. Ltd. won't be building final-assembly operations in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. Had the manufacturer of the e-Zone two-seater followed through on its intentions and set up in Philadelphia, it could have meant up to 200 jobs. (I wrote about CT&T's plans in September 2009 after its representatives had met with Mayor Nutter .) But Pennsylvania is far from the only state to see red when promised green jobs did not materialize.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2011
C RYSTAL WYATT had been dating her boyfriend nine months when she got a call at 2:30 a.m. from the police with the news that he'd been arrested. That began a long odyssey through the criminal-justice system that included her making 3 1/2-hour trips to Rockview State Correctional Institution to see him until they broke up after two years. They reunited after his release from prison, but that was short-lived because he wound up being reincarcerated. A lot of women would have become bitter, but this Overbrook resident was inspired to start her own business, a transportation service called Ride and Rebuild that would take loved ones to visit inmates at prison facilities around the state.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
You know what's harder than starting a small business? Starting a green small business. Try finding financing when the premise of what you are all about - being green, or sustainable - isn't entirely understood by banks or investors, and there's no long track record on which to base success projections. Add to that the ordinary technical challenges of any start-up: Developing a business plan. Getting the word out about products and services. Surviving. Good news: Help is on the way. It's not a record-setting cash gift from a deep-pocketed philanthropist like Raymond G. Perelman.
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