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NEWS
July 24, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ROGER HASLER
Drivers in East Whiteland Township will need more patience starting tomorrow. Phoenixville Pike will be closed between Route 401 and Yellow Springs Road for sewer work until mid-September; repaving continues on Business Route 30, and the Route 352 bridge is closed. On a happier note, a 5-mile stretch of Route 401 is to reopen.
NEWS
July 11, 1997 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Motorists in central Chester County may be wondering whether PennDot is playing some kind of cosmic joke on them. Unfortunately, this is no joke. The state Department of Transportation announced yesterday that it will close Route 401 from Route 113 in West Pikeland Township, Chester County, to the entrance to U.S. Route 202 in East Whiteland Township for two weeks, starting Monday. The five-mile stretch - a major thoroughfare where backups during morning rush hour are common - will be closed from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Despite a pending lawsuit, township supervisors have unanimously approved a shopping center opposite the Oxford Valley Mall. Township supervisors gave the go ahead for the Oxford Valley Center. A Middletown resident said he recently filed suit because he was upset with some of the land variances granted by the township zoning board for the center. Timothy Pokalsky said he was asking Bucks County Court to reverse the decision of the board for variance changes. The developer, Stephen Ehrhart of St. Louis, could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
November 12, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The shopping center project lauded by township officials for its plans to bring storm water improvements in the area is being challenged in Bucks County Court. A Middletown resident said he is upset with some of the land variances granted by the township zoning board. Timothy Pokalsky said he was asking the Court of Common Pleas to reverse the decision of the board for variance changes. Pokalsky said his request for a reversal included his objection to a variance for the amount of space between the project and the street, which is normally required to be 75 feet.
NEWS
September 30, 2002 | By Ron Tarver INQUIRER STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
The southernmost scenic route in Pennsylvania starts a little rough. Originating in Downingtown, it shoots west through a gauntlet of stoplights along Business Route 30, just a couple of miles south of Coatesville, home of the former Lukens Steel plant. When the route branches off on to Route 372, the Rand McNally folks - whose road atlas designates this a scenic route - begin to make sense. Winding west through Chester and Lancaster Counties, crossing the Susquehanna River to a dead end at Route 74, then heading north into York County - just under 60 miles - you can count the number of stoplights on one hand.
SPORTS
October 25, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Drive north along Business Route 202 into Doylestown, past a hospital campus on the left and a wall of verdant trees on the right, and soon a striking sight will emerge before you. Just as you reach the borough's border, a large gold-and-black placard welcomes all visitors to "Doylestown, Home of Central Bucks West, AAAA football state champs 1991-97-98-99. " Behind the placard, rising from the ground like a sleek gray mountain, is the home-side grandstand of War Memorial Field, C.B. West's stadium.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yardley, 5:20 a.m. Cpl. Tim Reeves is driving in his unmarked Dodge Magnum when his police radio chirps. His team, serving a bench warrant nearby, needs help: A suspect has barricaded himself in the attic. The team needs Reeves - and Kendo. Kendo is Reeves' drug-sniffing dog, a 10-year-old German shepherd with a mean bark. Just the sound of the dog could scare a suspect out of a house, the corporal knows. Racing along empty streets on an unseasonably warm morning, Reeves speeds to the scene.
NEWS
August 27, 1996 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An out-of-date traffic study will put the brakes on any decision about Conrail's plan to build a new industrial park. The township Board of Supervisors said last week it wanted a new traffic study that would include recommendations by the township Planning Commission before it considered the rail company's plan for the 81-acre site between Route 1 and Business Route 1. The Planning Commission recommended that the township approve the plan...
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a town battling an unrelenting demand to develop available land, township officials have taken another step toward their goal of providing a neighborhood park within walking distance of each resident. The Board of Supervisors announced that after seven years of negotiations, it has acquired a 29-acre tract for recreation in one of the township's most densely populated residential sections. Known as the Darlington tract, the site is a former farm west of Route 100 on the south side of Boot Road, less than a mile from the area the township has designated as the Exton Town Center.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One thing has become quite certain: Township officials want to move their municipal offices out of the cramped, dilapidated facility on Yardley Avenue in Fallsington. But deciding where they should move isn't so easy. Nobody's rushing to the huge, mostly empty Lincoln Crossing building, purchased by a former Board of Supervisors for a municipal complex. Tonight the board will take its first step toward making that big decision. The supervisors will hear the report of a committee charged with assessing what kinds of facilities the township needs, and what buildings are available.
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NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Yardley, 5:20 a.m. Cpl. Tim Reeves is driving in his unmarked Dodge Magnum when his police radio chirps. His team, serving a bench warrant nearby, needs help: A suspect has barricaded himself in the attic. The team needs Reeves - and Kendo. Kendo is Reeves' drug-sniffing dog, a 10-year-old German shepherd with a mean bark. Just the sound of the dog could scare a suspect out of a house, the corporal knows. Racing along empty streets on an unseasonably warm morning, Reeves speeds to the scene.
SPORTS
October 25, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Drive north along Business Route 202 into Doylestown, past a hospital campus on the left and a wall of verdant trees on the right, and soon a striking sight will emerge before you. Just as you reach the borough's border, a large gold-and-black placard welcomes all visitors to "Doylestown, Home of Central Bucks West, AAAA football state champs 1991-97-98-99. " Behind the placard, rising from the ground like a sleek gray mountain, is the home-side grandstand of War Memorial Field, C.B. West's stadium.
NEWS
August 19, 2007 | By Paul Nussbaum and Dylan Purcell INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Nearly 60 heavily traveled bridges in the Philadelphia region are in disrepair and rated as bad as, or worse than, the condition of the Minnesota bridge that collapsed Aug. 1, according to state and federal data. Deteriorating because of age, rust and crumbling concrete, the 57 "structurally deficient" bridges are vital links on Interstate 95, the Schuylkill Expressway, the Pennsylvania Turnpike, U.S. 130 and other highways. Each bridge carries at least 25,000 vehicles a day; some carry more than 160,000 a day. Officials in Pennsylvania and New Jersey say the bridges remain safe.
NEWS
June 1, 2006 | By Jacqueline Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A small plane broke apart in midair, showered a Jersey Shore neighborhood with wreckage, and nose-dived into thick woods next to a busy beach highway yesterday, killing its four occupants, authorities said. A wing landed on a roof, and other chunks of debris bombarded homes in the Beach Haven West neighborhood, but no one on the ground was hurt, Stafford Township Police Capt. Charles Schweigart said. "We're lucky it didn't crash across the street in the neighborhood," he said.
NEWS
October 9, 2003 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The signs of change are everywhere. Or, in the case of state route formerly known as 100, the signs are just gone. About 11 or 12 miles of the route that used to run through West Chester and the scenic Brandywine Valley of Chester and Delaware Counties have disappeared. The roads the route followed are still there, but the signs calling them Route 100 have vanished. It's not the work of vandals. Pennsylvania Route 100, at least a good portion of it, has been officially "de-designated" by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
NEWS
September 30, 2002 | By Ron Tarver INQUIRER STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
The southernmost scenic route in Pennsylvania starts a little rough. Originating in Downingtown, it shoots west through a gauntlet of stoplights along Business Route 30, just a couple of miles south of Coatesville, home of the former Lukens Steel plant. When the route branches off on to Route 372, the Rand McNally folks - whose road atlas designates this a scenic route - begin to make sense. Winding west through Chester and Lancaster Counties, crossing the Susquehanna River to a dead end at Route 74, then heading north into York County - just under 60 miles - you can count the number of stoplights on one hand.
NEWS
January 30, 2002 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Cheltenham billboard company is awaiting a judge's decision in a suit challenging the township's denial of plans to erect a 30-foot billboard at one of Chester County's busiest intersections. Chester County Court Judge Juan Sanchez could rule as early as today, an aide said. Keystone Outdoor Advertising Co. Inc. filed the suit in 1999 after it sought to build a billboard on the southeast corner of Routes 100 and 30, known as the Crossroads of Chester County. The intersection cuts right through Exton, the county's commercial heart.
NEWS
January 31, 2001 | By Lee Drutman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Township supervisors are scheduled to decide tonight whether Police Chief Arnold Conoline is guilty of the 12 administrative charges that the township levied against him in December, after Conoline allegedly refused to cooperate with an internal investigation of a drug arrest that went awry. In a thrice-postponed public hearing set for 7:30 p.m. at the township building, lawyers for both the township and Conoline will present their cases. The five supervisors will act as a jury to determine whether Conoline is guilty of disobedience, failure to adhere to chain of command, and refusal to adhere to authority, among other charges.
NEWS
December 20, 2000 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If there ever was a township institution, it is J. Donald Reimenschneider. Reimenschneider, township manager for the last 38 years, has been synonymous with East Whiteland since it was a semi-rural outpost at the end of the Main Line. Now it is home to many of the high-tech companies along Route 202. "My first budget was $185,000," said Reimenschneider, 66. The proposed 2001 budget is $15 million. When he first came to the job he was paid $7,500 a year. He now earns $80,000.
NEWS
October 3, 2000 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As shoppers, business owners and motorists adjusted to the latest construction nightmare on state Route 100, there was an attempt, although strained, to put a positive spin on things. "I guess the roads will be nice when they're done," said Sandee Gabriel, who manages a children's shoe store in the Whiteland Towne Center on Route 100. But the delays, Gabriel said, are another matter. "The customers complain all the time," said Gabriel, who could walk to her job. "I had a grandmother come in who said her grandkids had been more patient than she was after sitting 35 minutes in traffic.
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