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NEWS
January 29, 1996 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Madly scribbling an equation on a dry-erase board, Steven A. McNeil, dean of the Rowan College School of Business, looks the part of a professor teaching undergraduates a business lesson. This, though, is his pitch for the school's future, coming straight from a former Campbell Soup Co. corporate officer, a one-time Bumble Bee Tuna & Seafood president, and a past Haagen-Daz North America general manager. His formula: A common body of knowledge plus skills plus experience divided by a liberal-arts education equals student success.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | By Kaitlin Gurney, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The chairman of Rowan University's board of trustees - and his mother - announced a $2.5 million donation yesterday to create a professorial chair in the business school and an endowment for the library. In addition, a portion of the gift will buy a house for the university president. The donation is the second largest in the university's history, overshadowed only by the $100 million awarded to the school by industrialist Henry J. Rowan in 1992. Out of gratitude to Keith Campbell, his wife, Shirley, and his mother, Ann Campbell, the university will rename its library in their honor, president Donald Farish said.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1996 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Insurance risk managers, no less than gamblers or pool players, are in the business of figuring winning odds. So M. Moshe Porat, who has spent a career studying risk management, can be presumed to have known what he was doing when he agreed last month to become dean of Temple University's School of Business and Management. In some ways, the deck looks stacked against Porat, 49, who has taught risk management at Temple since 1979 and chaired its department of risk management since 1988.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1994 | By Jeff Brown, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Administrators, professors and graduates of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School have long liked to think of themselves as the creme de la creme. Now they have it in black and white. Business Week yesterday named Wharton the country's top business school, moving it up from fourth place in the last poll two years ago and putting it ahead of business graduate schools at Northwestern, Chicago and Harvard. Late yesterday, word swept the school and celebrations started to break out, Wharton dean Thomas P. Gerrity said shortly after the poll results were released.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2001 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Internet boom is fast fading, but it has left a permanent mark on higher education. Educators at area business schools say they have incorporated e-commerce into almost every aspect of their curriculums. Drexel University is taking applications for its fourth class of what it calls techno-M.B.A.s, people who get their masters of business administration degrees in a program taught almost completely online. The program, which Drexel began offering last spring, got about 50 applications the first time.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
One in an occasional series. AMIR CURRY lives next door to a scarred and slouching house that has been vacant nearly all of his 14 years. It's a trash-strewn magnet for raccoons that prevents Bella, his family's hyper Yorkie-terrier mix, from using the back yard. Amir's good friend Maliek Robbins, 13, lives a few minutes away on a tidy block off Woodland Avenue, but it, too, sits next to one of Kingsessing's abandoned rowhouses. The boys share something else. "I actually don't know my father," said Amir, a large, affable teen with dreams of becoming an NFL lineman, a barber, or a chef.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Villanova University will rename its School of Law for a 1973 alumnus who went on to a career in investment management, marking the first time that one of the university's schools will carry the name of a donor. Charles "Chuck" Widger, founder and executive chairman of Brinker Capital, a Berwyn investment management firm, gave the school $25 million, the second-largest donation in Villanova's history, the university announced Wednesday. The money is largely to be used for scholarships for students who show leadership skills and an interest in both business and law - worlds that Widger has bridged.
NEWS
November 16, 2010 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
He's been called a corporate raider, a business tycoon, a maverick financier, and a volatile one-man band. He's been labeled "pugnacious" and "colorful" and "renegade. " Tuesday, however, when he visits his alma mater, Drexel University, Bennett S. LeBow is likely to be addressed as "Sir. " LeBow, 72, Drexel's largest benefactor, is donating $45 million to build a new academic center for Drexel's business school, which is already named in his honor. "The current building is completely inadequate," he said Monday in an interview from his home on the exclusive Fisher Island in Miami.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robots playing hockey, even driving. Gaming gear that enables 3-D examination of human cells. The world's largest video game. These are part of the creative legacy of Drexel University. Then there's the experiment headquartered at Suite 402 in Drexel's Leonard Pearlstein Business Learning Center. "I call this a disruptive innovation in higher education," Donna De Carolis said of the goings-on she leads there. It's the new Charles D. Close School of Entrepreneurship, the first such freestanding school in the nation to offer degrees - currently a bachelor's in entrepreneurship and innovation.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis James LaCorte was a man of many sayings, of which the following was his favorite: "This piece of jewelry is one that people will look over, as opposed to overlooking. " It summed up a business acumen that served him well as co-owner of the Owl's Tale, a Haddonfield shop brimful of antiques, estate gems, and figurines. Known for his banter, sartorial taste, and arresting handlebar mustache, he presided over a lively heirloom trade for more than three decades. In the last year, though, illness increasingly came between Mr. LaCorte and the Owl's Tale.
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