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BUSINESS
October 5, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
A little money can go a long way in turning what seems like a good idea by a college student into a product or service that can be used by customers. The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania just got a lot more money with which to provide small grants to its students. The business school announced last week it had created the Wharton Innovation Fund, which will provide about $125,000 in grants annually in amounts ranging from $1,000 to $5,000. Wharton alum Alberto Vitale , the former chairman and chief executive of publisher Random House , is supplying the cash.
SPORTS
May 23, 2013 | BY KIMBERLY SLAVEN, Daily News Staff Writer slavenk@phillynews.com
PAT CHRISTENSEN played a couple of sports as a young athlete and, ironically, baseball wasn't his strength. Christensen, who participated in both soccer and baseball, was on the verge of calling it quits on the diamond when he received some advice from his parents, Patrick and Mary Beth. "They told me to try pitching for a year," he said. "So I tried that out and it worked out pretty well. "I wasn't very good at hitting when I was younger and it frustrated me. I moved on to pitching.
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Special to The Inquirer
A memorial Mass will be said at 7 a.m. Wednesday at St. Thomas of Villanova Church in Rosemont for Rose Rowland Buchan, 69, of Rosemont, who died Aug. 1, 1986, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. She was a homemaker for most of her life. Mrs. Buchan was born May 16, 1917, in New Bedford, Conn. Her family moved to the Main Line area when she was a child. She attended Upper Darby High School, where she was a member of the women's track team. She later attended business school, where she studied to be a secretary.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1990 | By Alicia Brooks, Special to The Inquirer
When Milton Leontiades left big business to become a business school professor in 1974, he thought his real-world experience would stand him in good stead. Instead, he said, he found a world only slightly connected to the business environment he came from - and where his students were headed. This gap between business education and reality is the subject of a new book by the Rutgers professor. "Business education is in danger of becoming so far removed from subject matter that the competitiveness of American business is in danger," said Leontiades, acting dean of Rutgers' School of Business in Camden, in an interview.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2006 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Try to see the world through the eyes of an alien who wants to know how to fit in among this planet's inhabitants. He notices that most people wear pants, and he wonders where people get them. He finds out that, even though they could buy pants by computer or by telephone, most go to a store. Why? People say they like to try them on. How, then, would this alien imagine our stores? futurist Edie Weiner asked nearly 70 business school leaders from around the nation who met Friday at Villanova University.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Inside Bartley Hall, the epicenter of Villanova University's business school, senior Charlie Dolan isn't chased by screaming young girls or packs of unrelenting paparazzi. But he is a big deal. Not that you have to take my word for it: "He's our superstar," said Madonna Sutter, associate dean of external relations for the business school. "He's just been a rocket ship," said Patrick G. Maggitti, the school's dean. "We're so proud of him," said communication associate Mariana Martinez.
NEWS
February 27, 1998 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
We've all heard the question: "Why can't Johnny read?" Perhaps just as important, says a new sampling of New Jersey's business executives, is the question: "Why can't Johnny show up on time?" Both reading ability and punctuality are mediocre among recent New Jersey high school graduates who go straight into the workforce, according to the survey of 605 executives. Some of the blame was laid on the public schools. In the survey released yesterday, 72 percent of respondents gave schools a "C" or below in meeting the needs of businesses.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1989 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Home Unity Savings Bank yesterday said it had hired a new president to help the thrift out of its financial problems. Michael C. Rush, a former investment banker for Shearson Lehman Hutton, has been named president and chief executive officer of the Lafayette Hill bank. He replaces Robert E. Plaza, who resigned in August 1988 amid mounting losses and lawsuits that accused Home Unity of misleading investors in its 1986 offering of stock to public investors. Donald H. McGill, Home Unity's chairman, said Rush was selected by the thrift's board of directors because of his "fine professional and academic credentials.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2002 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In these tough economic times, Widener University's business school is advising its students to get to work. Even while enrolled in college. "We're encouraging our undergraduates to be much more open to cooperative education or internships because they help you get [permanent] jobs," said Eric Brucker, dean of the School of Business Administration. "With the tighter economy, more and more employers are looking for experience. " "It was a hard sell before, when the market was so good in the '90s.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | By Joy Gasta and Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Glenn Wilchacky, a marketing major in West Chester University's School of Business, likes the school, especially his classes with Robert Kokat, a marketing professor who joined the WCU faculty two years ago after a long career in business. Now Wilchacky and some of his classmates are perplexed over the college's decision not to renew the contracts of Kokat and another member of the faculty, management professor Walter Smock. "I enjoyed his class a lot," Wilchacky said. "It was probably the most interesting class I had here, because he talked about his experience in the business world.
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