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BUSINESS
March 7, 1990 | By Alicia Brooks, Special to The Inquirer
When Milton Leontiades left big business to become a business school professor in 1974, he thought his real-world experience would stand him in good stead. Instead, he said, he found a world only slightly connected to the business environment he came from - and where his students were headed. This gap between business education and reality is the subject of a new book by the Rutgers professor. "Business education is in danger of becoming so far removed from subject matter that the competitiveness of American business is in danger," said Leontiades, acting dean of Rutgers' School of Business in Camden, in an interview.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2006 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Try to see the world through the eyes of an alien who wants to know how to fit in among this planet's inhabitants. He notices that most people wear pants, and he wonders where people get them. He finds out that, even though they could buy pants by computer or by telephone, most go to a store. Why? People say they like to try them on. How, then, would this alien imagine our stores? futurist Edie Weiner asked nearly 70 business school leaders from around the nation who met Friday at Villanova University.
NEWS
February 27, 1998 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
We've all heard the question: "Why can't Johnny read?" Perhaps just as important, says a new sampling of New Jersey's business executives, is the question: "Why can't Johnny show up on time?" Both reading ability and punctuality are mediocre among recent New Jersey high school graduates who go straight into the workforce, according to the survey of 605 executives. Some of the blame was laid on the public schools. In the survey released yesterday, 72 percent of respondents gave schools a "C" or below in meeting the needs of businesses.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1989 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Home Unity Savings Bank yesterday said it had hired a new president to help the thrift out of its financial problems. Michael C. Rush, a former investment banker for Shearson Lehman Hutton, has been named president and chief executive officer of the Lafayette Hill bank. He replaces Robert E. Plaza, who resigned in August 1988 amid mounting losses and lawsuits that accused Home Unity of misleading investors in its 1986 offering of stock to public investors. Donald H. McGill, Home Unity's chairman, said Rush was selected by the thrift's board of directors because of his "fine professional and academic credentials.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ROSETTA BRANDON came from Halifax, Va., where she was raised in a church-going atmosphere with family and friends who imbued in her the ideals of hard work and service to others. "Halifax was known for its church people," said longtime friend Robin Cunningham-Gladden. "They believed in working hard, save your money, do the right thing, be a lady. All those old-fashioned virtues. " Rosetta brought those virtues with her to Philadelphia when she arrived in 1958, took jobs in the computer industry and worked with children as a teacher's aide.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2002 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In these tough economic times, Widener University's business school is advising its students to get to work. Even while enrolled in college. "We're encouraging our undergraduates to be much more open to cooperative education or internships because they help you get [permanent] jobs," said Eric Brucker, dean of the School of Business Administration. "With the tighter economy, more and more employers are looking for experience. " "It was a hard sell before, when the market was so good in the '90s.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | By Joy Gasta and Larry Borska, Special to The Inquirer
Glenn Wilchacky, a marketing major in West Chester University's School of Business, likes the school, especially his classes with Robert Kokat, a marketing professor who joined the WCU faculty two years ago after a long career in business. Now Wilchacky and some of his classmates are perplexed over the college's decision not to renew the contracts of Kokat and another member of the faculty, management professor Walter Smock. "I enjoyed his class a lot," Wilchacky said. "It was probably the most interesting class I had here, because he talked about his experience in the business world.
NEWS
September 16, 1994 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Although he is talking about students, a conversation with Steven McNeil is not strictly academic. He hopes to "manufacture" students to order. He says business schools have failed to do "market research" on what the business world wants of their graduates. And he thinks the business world has not issued "purchase specifications" on what qualities the graduates should have. It's little surprise that one of the newest administrators of Rowan College of New Jersey talks this way. McNeil, who assumed the post of dean of the School of Business last month, has spent his entire career on the other side of the fence, in business.
NEWS
February 1, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As an associate director of MBA admissions at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, Judith Hodara hosts a weekly podcast that dispenses tips for getting into business school. It's not the only place she hands out advice. Recently, she was asked to sit on an advisory committee of a Japanese company that helps Japanese students get into top U.S. programs leading to a master's degree in business administration, including her own. Since 2004, she has also run her own college admissions business, IvyStone Educational Consultants, to guide high school students through the tricky process.
NEWS
August 15, 1997 | By Charles P. Pizzi
If we don't learn from the mistakes of the past, we are condemned to repeat them. Fifty years ago, Philadelphia had a booming manufacturing economy, with factories providing jobs in the tens of thousands. Where are the factories now? In an environment that did not foster growth and development, they left, taking the jobs with them. Today, our universities play a major economic role in providing jobs, specifically the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia's largest private-sector employer.
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