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NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis T. Harms, 96, an economist and long-tenured professor and administrator at Temple University's School of Business, died Tuesday, Jan. 22, at Taylor Hospice Residence in Ridley Park. Mr. Harms had been a faculty member at Temple since the 1940s. He was a professor of economics and later was chair of the university's department of economics. He also served as associate dean of the business school. His specialty was labor economics, and he wrote several books on the subject over the years, said his daughter, Monica.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
A little money can go a long way in turning what seems like a good idea by a college student into a product or service that can be used by customers. The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania just got a lot more money with which to provide small grants to its students. The business school announced last week it had created the Wharton Innovation Fund, which will provide about $125,000 in grants annually in amounts ranging from $1,000 to $5,000. Wharton alum Alberto Vitale , the former chairman and chief executive of publisher Random House , is supplying the cash.
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Special to The Inquirer
A memorial Mass will be said at 7 a.m. Wednesday at St. Thomas of Villanova Church in Rosemont for Rose Rowland Buchan, 69, of Rosemont, who died Aug. 1, 1986, at Bryn Mawr Hospital. She was a homemaker for most of her life. Mrs. Buchan was born May 16, 1917, in New Bedford, Conn. Her family moved to the Main Line area when she was a child. She attended Upper Darby High School, where she was a member of the women's track team. She later attended business school, where she studied to be a secretary.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1990 | By Alicia Brooks, Special to The Inquirer
When Milton Leontiades left big business to become a business school professor in 1974, he thought his real-world experience would stand him in good stead. Instead, he said, he found a world only slightly connected to the business environment he came from - and where his students were headed. This gap between business education and reality is the subject of a new book by the Rutgers professor. "Business education is in danger of becoming so far removed from subject matter that the competitiveness of American business is in danger," said Leontiades, acting dean of Rutgers' School of Business in Camden, in an interview.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2006 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Try to see the world through the eyes of an alien who wants to know how to fit in among this planet's inhabitants. He notices that most people wear pants, and he wonders where people get them. He finds out that, even though they could buy pants by computer or by telephone, most go to a store. Why? People say they like to try them on. How, then, would this alien imagine our stores? futurist Edie Weiner asked nearly 70 business school leaders from around the nation who met Friday at Villanova University.
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
An administrator who had been poised to become La Salle University's next president has withdrawn his candidacy after talks with the school's board of trustees broke down. Gregory Dell'Omo, president of Robert Morris University, near Pittsburgh, was to take the top job at La Salle. But that changed Thursday afternoon, according to a Robert Morris statement. "I wish La Salle University the very best as their search continues," Dell'Omo said in a news release. "It was gratifying to know that the progress that's been made here at RMU caught the attention of this institution and led them to invite me into their recruitment process.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Inside Bartley Hall, the epicenter of Villanova University's business school, senior Charlie Dolan isn't chased by screaming young girls or packs of unrelenting paparazzi. But he is a big deal. Not that you have to take my word for it: "He's our superstar," said Madonna Sutter, associate dean of external relations for the business school. "He's just been a rocket ship," said Patrick G. Maggitti, the school's dean. "We're so proud of him," said communication associate Mariana Martinez.
NEWS
February 27, 1998 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
We've all heard the question: "Why can't Johnny read?" Perhaps just as important, says a new sampling of New Jersey's business executives, is the question: "Why can't Johnny show up on time?" Both reading ability and punctuality are mediocre among recent New Jersey high school graduates who go straight into the workforce, according to the survey of 605 executives. Some of the blame was laid on the public schools. In the survey released yesterday, 72 percent of respondents gave schools a "C" or below in meeting the needs of businesses.
NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Milton C. Leontiades, 82, of Voorhees, dean of the Rutgers School of Business-Camden from June 1991 to August 2005, died of cardiac arrest on Sunday, Aug. 30, in the long-term care unit at Alaris Health at Cherry Hill. When Rutgers announced his retirement, an Inquirer reporter wrote that he "has a national reputation for his knowledge about the gaming industry, economic development, strategic planning and mergers and acquisitions. " Mr. Leontiades had been named acting dean of the business school in Camden in February 1989.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1989 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Home Unity Savings Bank yesterday said it had hired a new president to help the thrift out of its financial problems. Michael C. Rush, a former investment banker for Shearson Lehman Hutton, has been named president and chief executive officer of the Lafayette Hill bank. He replaces Robert E. Plaza, who resigned in August 1988 amid mounting losses and lawsuits that accused Home Unity of misleading investors in its 1986 offering of stock to public investors. Donald H. McGill, Home Unity's chairman, said Rush was selected by the thrift's board of directors because of his "fine professional and academic credentials.
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