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NEWS
November 14, 2013
G ARY A. GIAMARTINO, 61, of Chestnut Hill, is dean and professor of management and leadership at La Salle University's School of Business. Giamartino, who came to La Salle in July from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, collaborated with architects on a 78,000-square-foot, $35 million building that La Salle will erect at Chew Avenue and Wister Street in East Germantown. The project, to be announced today, is expected to create 600 construction jobs. The building is planned to open for classes in January 2016.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
While welcoming some 5,000 alumni for homecoming hoopla, Villanova University on Saturday presented its largest capital campaign ever: a $600 million fund-raising effort to increase financial aid for students, upgrade classrooms and academic buildings, and build a new performing arts center. The effort, dubbed "For the Greater Great: The Villanova Campaign to Ignite Change," is double the size of the previous campaign of $300 million that concluded in 2007. Villanova already has raised $285 million in the campaign's "quiet phase," which began in 2010.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Inside Bartley Hall, the epicenter of Villanova University's business school, senior Charlie Dolan isn't chased by screaming young girls or packs of unrelenting paparazzi. But he is a big deal. Not that you have to take my word for it: "He's our superstar," said Madonna Sutter, associate dean of external relations for the business school. "He's just been a rocket ship," said Patrick G. Maggitti, the school's dean. "We're so proud of him," said communication associate Mariana Martinez.
SPORTS
May 23, 2013 | BY KIMBERLY SLAVEN, Daily News Staff Writer slavenk@phillynews.com
PAT CHRISTENSEN played a couple of sports as a young athlete and, ironically, baseball wasn't his strength. Christensen, who participated in both soccer and baseball, was on the verge of calling it quits on the diamond when he received some advice from his parents, Patrick and Mary Beth. "They told me to try pitching for a year," he said. "So I tried that out and it worked out pretty well. "I wasn't very good at hitting when I was younger and it frustrated me. I moved on to pitching.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Eileen McCafferty DiFranco
My father's one claim to fame in the 1939 Northeast High School yearbook was that he was the shortest boy to graduate that year. At 63 inches, he was pictured in the yearbook shaking hands with the tallest guy on the basketball team. A resident of Port Richmond, my father attended Charles Carroll Elementary School and John Paul Jones Academy before enrolling in Northeast in 1936. In spite of the hardships imposed by the Depression, my father and his seven siblings, children of parents who never made it beyond fourth grade, all graduated from high school or business school.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Administrators took turns Saturday evening ringing the bell that once sounded across the trading floor of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange, marking the opening of a new finance lab at a celebration of the Rutgers School of Business-Camden's 25th anniversary. The shiny new room, with stock prices streaming along the wall and 16 workstations with Bloomberg terminals, was a far cry from the run-down annex of Victor Hall, where classes were held when the school opened in 1988. "It gave us some opportunity for creative teaching," said Carol Kaufman-Scarborough, a marketing professor who has been teaching at Rutgers since 1983.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Though a transplant from the Philadelphia suburbs, Nan Hunter Walnut was as much a creature of the New Jersey Pinelands as the deer drifting past her windows, the quail skittering through the brush, or the raccoons poking around her porch. She moved to 20 wild acres in Southampton Township, Burlington County, in 1970, as development bore down on the forest. She soon became one of the most persistent and persuasive voices among the Pine Barrens' first-generation citizen activists.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ROSETTA BRANDON came from Halifax, Va., where she was raised in a church-going atmosphere with family and friends who imbued in her the ideals of hard work and service to others. "Halifax was known for its church people," said longtime friend Robin Cunningham-Gladden. "They believed in working hard, save your money, do the right thing, be a lady. All those old-fashioned virtues. " Rosetta brought those virtues with her to Philadelphia when she arrived in 1958, took jobs in the computer industry and worked with children as a teacher's aide.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis T. Harms, 96, an economist and long-tenured professor and administrator at Temple University's School of Business, died Tuesday, Jan. 22, at Taylor Hospice Residence in Ridley Park. Mr. Harms had been a faculty member at Temple since the 1940s. He was a professor of economics and later was chair of the university's department of economics. He also served as associate dean of the business school. His specialty was labor economics, and he wrote several books on the subject over the years, said his daughter, Monica.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a $12.5 million gift, Drexel University will start a school of entrepreneurship that will help students start and grow their own businesses - and get paid for it, president John A. Fry said Wednesday. The new school, named after the late Charles D. Close, a 1936 Drexel graduate in engineering, will offer joint degree programs in entrepreneurship and other disciplines across the university. Some programs within the school will begin in the fall, but students won't officially enroll in the joint degree programs until September 2014.
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