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BUSINESS
August 26, 1996 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not many Philadelphia-area companies could get Microsoft's Bill Gates to come chat up their customers. But then again, not many area companies are growing as fast as SAP America Inc. Nor are many as tightly allied with Microsoft in jointly promoting their software worldwide. Gates, cofounder and chairman of Microsoft Corp., will be one of the keynote speakers today at Sapphire '96 at the Convention Center. About 8,000 people are expected to attend the four-day conference. SAP, which established an American beachhead eight years ago, is holding Sapphire, an annual meeting for users of its software, in Philadelphia for the first time.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1995 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine a software system that would take information entered on a single desktop computer and transmit it instantly to everyone in your company who needed it. With the entry of a single order, for example, everything from production schedules to purchasing requirements to financial records would be changed on computers at facilities anywhere in the world. Precious few business software systems work that seamlessly, but Systems & Computer Technology Corp., of Malvern, says it has found one: a package produced by start-up Adage Systems International Inc. of Westport, Conn.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1999 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hershey Foods Corp. blamed declining third-quarter sales and earnings on it, and warned it could cause candy shortages during Halloween. Appliance-maker Whirlpool Corp. said it was responsible for some temporary delivery delays. Both companies were referring to the implementation of a popular type of business software called an enterprise resource planning, or ERP, system. Specifically, systems made by the world leader in ERP, SAP A.G., a German company whose U.S. subsidiary is based in Newtown Square.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2005 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oracle Corp., the world's second-largest maker of business software behind SAP AG, said yesterday that it will buy competitor Siebel Systems Inc. for $5.85 billion, or $10.66 a share, in cash and stock. By Oracle's method of reckoning, the move placed it ahead of Germany-based SAP in selling customer service software, but an SAP official disputed that. SAP's U.S. headquarters is in Newtown Square. Oracle is based in Redwood Shores, Calif.; and Siebel, in San Mateo, Calif. The addition of Siebel's customers will "strengthen our number-one position in applications in North America and move us closer to the number-one position in applications globally," Oracle chief executive officer Larry Ellison said.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1997 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SAP America Inc., the business-software company in Wayne, has joined with computer-chip giant Intel Corp. to market a new system allowing merchants to make sales over the World Wide Web. The system, called Pandesic, lets a consumer purchase goods or services online while simultaneously coordinating the sale between the merchant's suppliers, warehouses and shippers. It is so automated that it even prints shipping labels and e-mails an invoice to the customer at the time an order is placed, according to officials of the two companies who demonstrated the Pandesic system at a news briefing yesterday in San Francisco.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all the talk of information-technology jobs going overseas, one area high-tech firm sees the United States as still a good place to do business - and to employ programmers. The firm, QlikTech (pronounced click-tech), is Swedish. At least it was until a few weeks ago, when it moved its world headquarters from Lund, Sweden, to Radnor. "In order to become a really global company with really global success, you have to succeed in the U.S.," said M?ns Hultman, the Swedish chief executive officer of QlikTech.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As shares of Oracle Corp. paced gains on Wall Street yesterday after a glowing earnings report late Tuesday, rival SAP AG scrambled to douse incendiary remarks made at its expense by Oracle officials. Germany-based SAP has its headquarters for North and South America in Newtown Square, where it employs about 1,500. In releasing better-than-expected fiscal first-quarter earnings results Tuesday, Oracle president Larry Ellison said a shaken SAP was rethinking its strategy. He also said his rival was delaying a major product release until 2010.
NEWS
April 28, 1998 | By Christine S. Bahls and Richard V. Sabatini, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer correspondents Lewis Kamb and Mark Binker also contributed to this article
A Bucks County computer specialist on assignment in Lenexa, Kan., apparently was murdered in her hotel room over the weekend, police said yesterday. Claire-Marie Monti, 32, of Holland, was found in her room at the Howard Johnson's hotel on Sunday by two members of the housekeeping staff. Police suspect she was strangled. Monti was part of a team of computer specialists from Prophet 21 Inc. in Yardley who went to the Midwest on Thursday to help clients. She was the only member of the team sent to Kansas City, police and a company official said.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a profitable second quarter that many analysts nonetheless considered a stumble, SAP AG seems to have regained its footing in the third quarter. It announced yesterday that software license sales increased 17 percent to 691 million euros, or $866 million, compared with 590 million euros, or $743 million, in the third quarter of 2005. The quarter also served as validation - temporarily at least - of SAP's steady-as-she-goes business strategy, which came under attack recently by rival software-maker Oracle Corp.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2011 | By Joshua Freed, Associated Press
Technology stocks fell Wednesday, dragged down by a weak earnings report from the business software maker Oracle Corp. Broad market indexes were flat. The Dow Jones industrial average eked out a gain of 4 points after having been down most of the day. The Dow was down 104 points at midday, led by technology stocks. The rare earnings miss by Oracle raised worries that weak government and business spending might hurt other big technology companies. International Business Machines Corp., the largest computer-services company, was by far the biggest loser in the Dow, falling 3.1 percent to $181.47.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 8, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano
Microsoft has joined with some of its big technology clients to fill showrooms in Malvern and 26 other business centers around the globe with fancy, elegant gadgets and applications designed to make offices obsolete. Think. for example, of iPads as big as your wall or as accessible as your home TV screen, where colleagues, clients, and customers can share notes, data, and links, and design and promote projects, in real time. A Canadian company, Smart Technologies, has developed generations of these interactive whiteboards over the last 20 years.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2011 | By Joshua Freed, Associated Press
Technology stocks fell Wednesday, dragged down by a weak earnings report from the business software maker Oracle Corp. Broad market indexes were flat. The Dow Jones industrial average eked out a gain of 4 points after having been down most of the day. The Dow was down 104 points at midday, led by technology stocks. The rare earnings miss by Oracle raised worries that weak government and business spending might hurt other big technology companies. International Business Machines Corp., the largest computer-services company, was by far the biggest loser in the Dow, falling 3.1 percent to $181.47.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
If starting a business is hard, then imagine leaving a steady job at SAP A.G . to start one when you also are a mother to four boys under 7. That's what Joanne Lang did in July 2010, when she took the entrepreneurial plunge with her AboutOne Inc. , an online organizational tool for families. How did she possibly manage it? Lang, 41, made sure her financial situation enabled her to live without a salary for a year. Giving her nanny options in the start-up was key, she said.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2008 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since 2002, William R. "Bill" McDermott's purview has expanded steadily around the globe as an executive at German software developer SAP AG in Newtown Square. First he was chief of its North American division, then added Latin America, and his division now includes India, China and Japan. Not bad for a 46-year-old executive, who also had been one of the youngest executives at Xerox Corp. before coming to SAP. From SAP's 500-acre campus at West Chester Pike and Route 252, McDermott directs 18,000 employees, including 2,158 in Newtown Square.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a profitable second quarter that many analysts nonetheless considered a stumble, SAP AG seems to have regained its footing in the third quarter. It announced yesterday that software license sales increased 17 percent to 691 million euros, or $866 million, compared with 590 million euros, or $743 million, in the third quarter of 2005. The quarter also served as validation - temporarily at least - of SAP's steady-as-she-goes business strategy, which came under attack recently by rival software-maker Oracle Corp.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As shares of Oracle Corp. paced gains on Wall Street yesterday after a glowing earnings report late Tuesday, rival SAP AG scrambled to douse incendiary remarks made at its expense by Oracle officials. Germany-based SAP has its headquarters for North and South America in Newtown Square, where it employs about 1,500. In releasing better-than-expected fiscal first-quarter earnings results Tuesday, Oracle president Larry Ellison said a shaken SAP was rethinking its strategy. He also said his rival was delaying a major product release until 2010.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission has become the first official customer for Duet, a major release from software heavyweights Microsoft Corp. and SAP AG. The Turnpike Commission said yesterday that it would pay about $30 million for the project, which was scheduled to take 30 months to fully implement. Duet creates a bridge between SAP software, which automates back-office functions such as accounting and supply-chain management, and Microsoft, with which most cubicle workers are familiar through its Office suite of e-mail, word-processing and number-crunching programs.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2006 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all the talk of information-technology jobs going overseas, one area high-tech firm sees the United States as still a good place to do business - and to employ programmers. The firm, QlikTech (pronounced click-tech), is Swedish. At least it was until a few weeks ago, when it moved its world headquarters from Lund, Sweden, to Radnor. "In order to become a really global company with really global success, you have to succeed in the U.S.," said M?ns Hultman, the Swedish chief executive officer of QlikTech.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2005 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SAP AG easily beat analysts' third-quarter profit expectations, largely led by torrid software sales growth in its Newtown Square-based U.S. division. The German software company said revenue for the quarter grew 13 percent to 2.01 billion euros, or $2.4 billion, from 1.78 billion euros. Profit was 334 million euros ($400 million, or $1.29 a share), a 15 percent increase from 291 million euros for the third quarter of 2004. Analysts had been expecting net income of 327 million euros, or $391 million.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2005 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oracle Corp., the world's second-largest maker of business software behind SAP AG, said yesterday that it will buy competitor Siebel Systems Inc. for $5.85 billion, or $10.66 a share, in cash and stock. By Oracle's method of reckoning, the move placed it ahead of Germany-based SAP in selling customer service software, but an SAP official disputed that. SAP's U.S. headquarters is in Newtown Square. Oracle is based in Redwood Shores, Calif.; and Siebel, in San Mateo, Calif. The addition of Siebel's customers will "strengthen our number-one position in applications in North America and move us closer to the number-one position in applications globally," Oracle chief executive officer Larry Ellison said.
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